jose andres paella

Printed inside the front cover of José Andrés's cookbook Made in Spain is the line: “I won't be happy until there is a paella pan on every. Jaleo, the Spanish paella and tapas restaurant from José Andrés at the Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas, now has takeout options including pan de. Jun 14, 2012 - So, one Sunday night I was sitting around at home when I got an email from my friend, the magnificent chef, José Andrés. He was in London and.

Jose andres paella -

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REVIEW: We Stuffed Ourselves With Carbs and Cheese (But NOT Tiny Cokes!) at Jaleo in Disney World!

By Sara McOmber1 Comment

We’re heading back to Jaleo by Chef José Andréstoday! We haven’t been back since the restaurant reopened in Disney Springs last August, so we are ready to get stuffed with paella, cheese croquetas, and sangria again.

Jaleo in Disney Springs

In the past, we’ve really enjoyed the delicious tapas and unique eats at Jaleo in Disney Springs. Let’s take a look at some old favorites and what’s different now at this restaurant!

[Read more…]

Filed Under: disney restaurant review, Disney Springs, Featured, Table-Service, Walt Disney WorldTagged With: Art's Fabulous Fried Chicken, Charcuterie Board, cheese plate, Chef José Andrés, chicken croquetas, chicken croquettes, Chorizo, chorizo casero con pure de patatas al aceite de olivia, cono de queso de cabre con marmelada de tomate, Croquetas de Pollo, disney world seafood, disney world tapas, five quesos, goats cheese cone, goats cheese cone with tomato marmalade, ham at jaleo, Jaleo, Jaleo by Chef Jose Andres, Jaleo by José Andrés, Jaleo Disney Springs, jaleo review, jamon iberico de bellota cortado a mano, paella, paella and rice, paella y arroces, pan con chocolate, Patatas Bravas, sangria de cava, seafood, selection of cheese, Tapas, tomato bread

Jeff Bezos Awards Disney World Restaurant Chef and Owner $100 Million

By Sara McOmber1 Comment

Chef José Andrés is the owner and creator of Jaleo, which has a location inside Disney Springs!

Jaleo in Disney Springs

And Jeff Bezos, the founder of Amazon, has just awarded Andrés for his humanitarian and unifying efforts with $100 million. This new award is called the “Courage and Civility Award.” [Read more…]

Filed Under: Disney News, Disney Springs, Featured, NewsTagged With: 100 million, Chef José Andrés, courage and civility award, disney springs jaleo, Jaleo, jeff bezos, jeff bezos award, jose andres, jose andres award, jose andres jaleo, jose andres nobel prize nomination, jose andres world central kitchen

Jaleo to Reopen on Select Days in Disney Springs Beginning TODAY

By Janelle SheetzLeave a Comment

When we found out several third party stores and restaurants would be welcoming guests back on May 20th, we knew Jaleo by Chef José Andrés would not be among them.

Jaleo

The signature restaurant known for its modern Spanish cuisine has remained shuttered since March and shut down right before celebrating its 1-year anniversary at Disney World with a Paella Block Party!

[Read more…]

Filed Under: Disney News, Disney Springs, Featured, Table-Service, Walt Disney WorldTagged With: Chef José Andrés, Closures, dinner, disney springs, Disney World, Jaleo, reopening, restaurant, Signature Dining, spanish

7 Pieces of ❤️GOOD NEWS❤️ From Disney So Far

By Carly Terzigni4 Comments

If you're looking for information related to the current closures and their effect on the Disney Parks, click here for all the up-to-date details and click here for answers to dozens of reader FAQs.

 

Disney has brought a smile to our face in a lot of ways over the last few weeks. Whether it’s reading us bedtime stories or streaming live on Facebook, Disney performers and celebrities have come into our homes digitally in ways that have brought some joy to these uncertain times. But these aren’t the only ways they’re making us smile.

©Disney

There has been so much GOOD NEWS to celebrate coming from this crisis. Therefore, we want to share seven of our favorite stories with you today!

[Read more…]

Filed Under: Featured, Walt Disney WorldTagged With: Aulani, Chef José Andrés, disney donates, disney springs, Disney World, Disneyland, Easter, easter lilies, Jaleo, jose andres, Orlando, Orlando Police Department, second harvest

Jaleo’s Disney Springs Team Delivers HUNDREDS of Free Meals to Families in Need!

By Carly TerzigniLeave a Comment

If you're looking for information related to the current closures and their effect on the Disney Parks, click here for all the up-to-date details and click here for answers to dozens of reader FAQs.

These past few weeks have been nothing short of challenging for many communities across the country.

Jaleo

During this strange time, we’re seeing individuals stepping up in incredible ways, and one of those fantastic individuals is Chef José Andrés!

[Read more…]

Filed Under: Disney Springs, Featured, Special Stuff, Walt Disney WorldTagged With: Chef José Andrés, disney springs, Jaleo, Jaleo by Chef Jose Andres

Are Disney World Restaurants Really Just Firing Everyone?! It’s Much More Complicated Than You Think.

By Jessica Hogan23 Comments

When Disney World announced it would be temporarily closing, they noted they would continue paying full-time Cast Members who were unable to go to work.

Disney World Will Be Closed For At Least Two Weeks

But what does this closure and the current restaurant restrictions mean for employees of third-party-owned businesses on property? This is certainly a tough time for the world, but for those in service industries, it will be downright devastating.[Read more…]

Filed Under: Counter-Service, Disney News, disney parks, Disney Springs, Featured, News, Table-ServiceTagged With: cast members, chef andres, Chef Art Smith, Chef José Andrés, disney springs, Homecomin, Jaleo, laid off, let go, restaurants, staff, unemployed, unpaid

Some Jaleo Restaurants are Temporarily Closing Due to Health Concerns

By Brianna LeCompteLeave a Comment

With the parks at Disney World preparing to close amid coronavirus concerns, some Disney Springs locations are still considering next steps.

Jaleo

As of press time, Disney Springs will remain open during the park closure, but some individual locations are still choosing to temporarily shut their doors. Some stores have announced that they will be temporarily closedand House of Bluesis cancelling several scheduled events. Another location that might be impacted is the Spanish restaurant, Jaleo.

[Read more…]

Filed Under: Disney Springs, Featured, Walt Disney WorldTagged With: Chef José Andrés, disney springs, Jaleo, Jaleo by Chef Jose Andres

Here’s Your Chance To Win FREE Tickets to Jaleo’s Paella Block Party in Disney Springs!

By Janelle Sheetz105 Comments

UPDATE: Due to Coronavirus concerns, Jaleo has decided to reschedule this event for the fall so we will be delaying the giveaway until a later time. We will update you as soon as we know more information. All guests who already purchased tickets are being notified.

You may remember it was almost one year ago that Chef Jose Andres opened his restaurant Jaleo in Disney Springs (click here to reminisce with us a little!).

Chef Jose Andres at Jaleo in Disney Springs

And to celebrate their 1-year anniversary, these New Kids on the Block are celebrating the best way they know how — by throwing a Paella Block Party!

[Read more…]

Filed Under: Disney Springs, Featured, Table-Service, Walt Disney WorldTagged With: Chef José Andrés, disney springs, Disney World, free tickets, Giveaway, Jaleo, jaleo paella block party, paella, prize

A Paella Block Party Is Coming to Jaleo in Disney Springs!

By AJ and the DFB TeamLeave a Comment

UPDATE: Due to Coronavirus concerns, Jaleo has decided to reschedule this event for the fall. We will update you as soon as we know more information. All guests who already purchased tickets are being notified.

Saturday, March 21st will bring a Paella Block Party to Disney Springs!

Jaleo at Disney Springs

What’s the occasion? Jaleo by Chef José Andrés is “taking over the sidewalk on Disney Spring’s West Side” and opening up the restaurant to celebrate the signature spot’s one-year anniversary and very first Paella Block Party! [Read more…]

Filed Under: Disney Springs, Featured, Table-Service, Walt Disney WorldTagged With: Chef José Andrés, disney springs, Jaleo, Jaleo by Chef Jose Andres, paella, Paella Block Party

A 6-Course Truffle Dinner Is Coming to Disney World Next Month and It’s FANCY FANCY!

By Janelle SheetzLeave a Comment

While it isn’t hard to find ways to spoil yourself at Disney World (we’re talkin’ ice cream for breakfast, riding Pirates of the Caribbean over and over again…) we just discovered a new dining experience that will be coming soon to Disney World!

Jaleo

And if this dinner is as off-the-chain as it sounds, it’s going to be one VERY cool experience, indeed!

[Read more…]

Filed Under: Disney News, Disney Springs, Featured, Special Stuff, Walt Disney WorldTagged With: black truffle, Chef José Andrés, disney springs, Disney World, Jaleo, Jaleo by Chef Jose Andres, jose andres, truffle and wine dinner

Источник: https://www.disneyfoodblog.com/tag/chef-jose-andres/

Chef José Andrés is known for popularizing his home country’s cuisine in America. The Spanish-born chef–who apprenticed at one of the world’s most innovative and award-winning restaurants of all time, Spain’s elBulli–is an innovator in his own right. His 23 restaurants offer complex culinary and cultural tours of Spain, Latin America, Turkey, Greece, and even the U.S. For chef Andrés, it’s not just about the food–it’s also about the story of the traditions and the people who produce it.

We caught up with Andrés at a recent event in his current hometown of Washington, D.C., where he was focused on feeding the masses with a hearty vegetable paella. Andrés, along with chefs from his flagship restaurant Jaleo, cooked up a couple of batches using produce rescued from area farms and wholesale markets that would have been wasted because they weren’t “pretty” enough to sell. Combatting food waste is a cause close to the chef’s heart.

“Chefs can help by setting an example,” he said. “We can explain to our guests that a tomato doesn’t have to look perfect to be tasty. And we can tell our local farmer we don’t care how her carrots look–we love them all the same.”

Here’s how you can cook like chef Andrés–and combat food waste by putting those ugly carrots to good use!

— The Renewal Project editor Margaret Myers


Paella de verduras by chef José Andrés

Ingredients
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
3 cloves purple garlic
1/4 cup diced onions
3 baby artichokes, cut into quarters
1/4 cup diced carrots
1/4 cup diced red bell pepper
1/4 cup diced green bell pepper
1/4 cup cauliflower florets
1/4 cup 1-inch pieces zucchini
1/4 cup halved baby yellow squash
Pinch saffron
5 cups mushroom stock, or vegetable stock
1 cup Spanish Bomba rice
2 tablespoons green peas (if in season)
1/4 cup halved French green beans
1/4 cup 2-inch pieces asparagus
Sea salt, to taste

Directions
Heat the olive oil in a 13-inch paella pan over medium-high heat. Add the garlic and onions and sauté until soft and lightly browned, about three minutes. Add the artichokes, carrots, bell peppers, cauliflower, zucchini, and squash. Lay the vegetables flat so that they form one even layer.

Crumble the saffron into the pan and pour in the stock. Lightly season with salt, as the liquid will become more concentrated (and therefore saltier) during cooking. Increase the heat to high and bring the mixture to a boil. Let the mixture boil for two to three minutes, then add the rice and peas and stir until well-combined. Reduce the heat to medium-high, add the rest of the vegetables, and cook for four minutes. Do not stir the rice again, as this can cause it to cook unevenly.

After four minutes, reduce the heat to low and cook for another seven minutes. During the last few minutes of cooking, you should hear the crackling of the rice at the bottom of the pan. Remove the paella from the heat, cover with a clean kitchen towel, and let rest for two or three minutes.

Garnish paella with fresh thyme or rosemary, and serve.

Note: The ratio of stock to rice is very important for your rice to cook properly. If using Spanish Bomba rice, always use five cups stock for one cup of rice. If using Spanish Valencia rice, use four cups stock for one cup of rice. You can find these products at many grocery stores and also LaTienda.com, which specializes in Spanish foods.

Источник: https://www.therenewalproject.com/use-ugly-vegetables-to-make-this-beautiful-spanish-dish/

Meet DC’s Newest Michelin-Starred Chef, And His Secret Paella Recipe

Danny Lledó shares the flavors of his Spanish heritage every day with diners at Glover Park’s newly Michelin starred Xiquet. Here, the menu regularly features exquisite seafood, Iberian pork, and a “xocolate” bomb sure to woo any chocoholic. His tasting menu is laudable, and both this and his à la carte choices make excellent use of the restaurant’s wood-burning fire: a centerpiece of the glass-walled kitchen in clear view of guests.

But Lledó’s star dish is undoubtedly his paella. He is currently the most-awarded paella chef in the U.S., with seven honors for his iterations of the Valencian rice specialty, including six first place awards in international competitions. He was even a finalist at the prestigious Paella Valenciana de Sueca in 2018.

“My culture and my family really influenced my decision to focus on Valencian cuisine,” he explains. “Spending part of my life in Dénia, Spain, I had the opportunity to witness how food brings people together. So many of my family and friends were involved in different parts of the food industry. My uncle had a commercial fishing boat, a few of my aunts had farms, and close friends of mine had restaurants that bought fish, meats and vegetables from my family. It was a cool and unique thing to be able to see the whole process come together like that, so I knew I wanted to incorporate that special experience into my restaurant. “

Danny Lledó

Following in the footsteps of his father, a chef in the coastal city of Dénia, halfway between Valencia and Alicante, Lledó honed his skills working at José Andrés’s Taberna del Alabardero and Botin. He only opened Xiquet in March 2020, above his Slate Wine Bar. Much of the restaurant’s short life, then, has been defined by the pandemic. But Lledó didn’t let that stop him from building a restaurant whose appeal lies in its specificity.

“People enjoy and appreciate Spanish cuisine here in DC,” he says, “but because there are so many celebrated Spanish restaurants, this allowed me to be more regional and really dive into the gastronomy of a very specific region instead of trying to cover the whole country.”

His seafood paella exemplifies both Valencian cuisine at large and Lledó’s own detail-oriented approach to this specialty so steeped in memory. “Paella is definitely a nostalgic, childhood dish for me,” he says. “When I think of the memories that paella brings me to, I think of beautiful Sunday afternoons in Dénia with my family.”

The secret to success when making this paella at home, according to Lledó, is in the broth.

“At Xiquet DL, we make different broths every day, depending on the paellas we have on the menu,” he says. To opt for store-bought is a major newbie mistake. “Making the broth is where 60 to 80 percent of the flavors come from,” he says, so be sure that you’re making your own. 

For this recipe, you’re relying on a seafood broth, which you can make by simmering shrimp and lobster shells for about 30 minutes with aromatics like onion, celery, carrot and bay. Roast the shells in a 400-degree oven for 10 minutes before beginning for extra flavor.

Lledó recommends seeking out the freshest seafood you can find at your local seafood counter or purveyor, noting that “fresh seafood will make all the difference.” And while you’re shopping, you might keep an eye out for Lledó’s rice of choice, sénia, which, he notes “absorbs the flavors better.” The bomba rice he calls for in the recipe below, he says, “is a great alternative for home cooks, because it is much more forgiving if overcooked.”

One last tip? Pay careful attention to cooking times.

“If done properly, you can create this rich caramelization of the paella — the socarrat,” he says. This flavorful crust at the bottom of the pan is the most sought-after bite of the entire dish.

Danny Lledó’s Seafood Paella


Serves 2

  • 25 ml (1⅔ tablespoon) olive oil
  • 2 large prawns
  • 2 baby cuttlefish
  • Sea salt, to taste (1 to 3 grams)
  • 1 clove garlic, chopped
  • 1 roma tomato, puréed
  • ½ tablespoon sweet paprika
  • 1 fillet dorade (bream)
  • 480 ml (2 cups) seafood broth
  • ¼ gram (⅓ teaspoon) saffron
  • 160 grams (⅘ cup) bomba rice

Instructions: 

Add half the olive oil to a paella pan or 10-inch skillet set over medium heat. Once the oil is hot, add the prawn (shell on), and season with salt. Sear the prawn evenly on both sides, until the juices of the prawn are extracted: you will see this through a browning of the olive oil (approximately 2 minutes on each side). Remove the prawns from the pan and set aside. Sauté the cuttlefish in the same way, and set aside.

Increase the heat to medium-high. To make the sofrito, mix the tomato puree, garlic, and sweet paprika in the pan. Deglaze with seafood broth. Add the saffron and mix to combine. Increase the heat to high. 

Once the broth begins to boil, add the bomba rice, sprinkling it evenly over the pan. Season to taste with salt, and cook on high until the rice is visible in the broth. At this point, reduce the heat to low.

Add the seared prawn, cuttlefish, and dorade on top of the rice; the steam will cook the dorade. Simmer until the broth has completely evaporated, then increase the heat to high for approximately a minute to create the socarrat, the flavorful crust on the bottom of the pan. 

Remove the pan from the heat and serve. 

This article was featured in the InsideHook DC newsletter. Sign up now for more from the Beltway.

Источник: https://www.insidehook.com/article/washington-dc/danny-lledo-xiquet-seafood-paella-recipe

Printed inside the front cover of José Andrés’s cookbook Made in Spain is the line: “I won’t be happy until there is a paella pan on every backyard grill in America.” While it certainly isn’t an easy dish, Andrés believes paella can—and should—be made and enjoyed at home.

At his flagship Spanish restaurant, Jaleo, in Washington, D.C., paellas for a crowd are made to order and served tableside. The Bethesda location also offers public and private classes to teach guests how to prepare the classic dish for themselves.

Though Daniel Lugo, head chef of the Bethesda Jaleo, is Puerto Rican with Spanish heritage, he credits Andrés with teaching him about paella while working at the now-shuttered Mi Casa in Puerto Rico. “That’s when I truly learned the art of cooking paella," he says. "Trust me, I thought I knew how to cook paella.”

Here, he shares some of the expertise he's gained over the years.

What Is Paella?

There’s much debate about what you can and can’t call a paella. Paella Valenciana is the original, made with a traditional set of ingredients including rabbit, chicken and beans. “People from Valencia are very [protective of] their paellas, so everything else that is not that paella they call arrozarrozmade in a paella pan,” Lugo explains.

For everyone except diehard Valencians, you can broaden the definition a bit. “If you cook it in a paella pan, you’re safe to call it a paella.”

Equipment and Ingredients for Paella

“The first thing you’re going to need is, of course, a paella pan. Because without a paella pan, it’s not a paella,” Lugo says. Paella pans are wide, shallow and flat-bottomed, allowing you to spread the rice out for even cooking.

The size of the pan is especially important. A 12-inch pan is very manageable and can cook one cup of rice. Lugo recommends the brand Pata Negra, but says you can also find lower-cost options from Amazon.

The heat source on which you cook the paella also matters. Lugo says a gas flame offers the most consistency, whether it’s a stovetop burner, a gas grill or an outdoor paella ring. More adventurous home cooks could choose to cook over a fire pit or a charcoal grill, but it requires more skill to control the heat.

If your only option is an electric stove, you’ll want to use a smaller six-inch paella pan and finish it in the oven, which will ensure the dish cooks evenly and at the right speed.

Rice is another key factor that can make or break your paella, and Lugo recommends Spanish bomba rice. Bomba is a short grain rice that can absorb three to four times its volume in stock, producing a more concentrated flavor, which lays the foundation of the dish. (Arborio rice is not an adequate substitute because it is too starchy and can’t absorb as much liquid.) You can find it at Spanish grocers or at high-end stores like Whole Foods. “It’s a little bit on the pricey side, but I’m telling you, it’s totally worth it,” he says.

Another flavor boost comes from salmorra, which is a blend of ñora peppers, tomatoes and garlic. “Personally I add this to any paella that I make at home. This will be like the bomb of flavor,” Lugo says. If you can’t find ñora peppers, you could use sofrito instead—a sauce of tomatoes, onion, garlic and peppers—for a similar effect.

With the base of the paella established, you can add pretty much anything you like. Just follow the ratio of one cup of uncooked rice to four cups of add-ins.

How to Cook Paella

Lugo says one of the most important ingredients for a paella is patience. “It takes a lot of time, and there are certain times that you cannot touch it,” he says. “If you move the paella, the rice will release the starch and then the liquid is going to be too thick and it will not cook the rice the right way.” Unlike risotto, stirring is the enemy of a paella.

You also want to make sure to have your mise en place set before you start cooking. “At the beginning, it’s a lot of quick processes. If you don’t have your ingredients ready, you might burn it or you’re going to have to turn down the fire and it’s not going to be the same.”

Depending on what ingredients you add to your paella, the start of the process will vary. For seafood, you should sear it in olive oil and set it aside, and then return it to the pan when the rice is almost done, letting the steam from the rice finish cooking the seafood. For meat (like chicken or rabbit) or vegetables, you’ll sear them and then push them to the outside of the pan to cook along with the rice, stock and other ingredients.

Lugo prefers to add the stock before the rice because it yields a more consistent result. “If you’re searing the rice, you’re basically starting the cooking process, and then you add the stock and it’s going to change the temperature of the paella,” he says.

You can add the rice once the stock is at a simmer. “You don’t want to dump it in on one side,” Lugo cautions. “You want to sprinkle it like salt,” which will ensure even cooking.

Shake the pan gently to evenly distribute the ingredients and let it simmer on high. “You’re going to get nervous, you’re going to be like ‘oh my god, is it going to burn,’ but like I said, patience.”

Watch the pan closely to see where the stock is bubbling more rigorously. Occasionally rotate the pan to distribute the heat and allow all sections of the pan to cook evenly.

After the liquid starts to thicken and you're able to see the rice emerge from the stock, turn the heat down to medium and don’t stir or move the rice. “It’s going to create this little barrier,” Lugo says. “That is basically creating like a little oven, which the rice is cooking underneath. If you move it, you’re disturbing the process.” Continue to decrease the heat as the liquid is absorbed by the rice.

Temperatures are critical throughout the cooking process. “If we leave it on high, the liquid is going to evaporate faster than the rice cooks, but then again, if we add the stock and we always keep it on low, the rice is going to cook faster than the liquid evaporates.”

From the point when you add the rice, it will take about 20 minutes to cook. “We cannot rush this process,” he says. You want the rice to have a little bite to it. “In the U.S., most people like the paella overcooked, but you should be able to feel the grain. You don’t want it to be too mushy.”

Near the end of the cooking, you want to create a socarrat, or a layer of crispy rice stuck to the bottom of the pan. To do this, turn the heat up to high and listen. “One of the things that José always teaches is the paella talks to you,” Lugo says. “You can hear those little bubbles; it’s telling you that the liquid is evaporating, and little by little, it’s creating that socarratthat we want. Once we can hear those bubbles, it means it’s almost done.”

The sound will get louder as the socarratforms, but take care not to burn it at this stage. Test the crispiness of the bottom layer by inserting a spoon and feeling the texture against the pan.

The easiest way to finish a paella—especially if you’re using an electric stove—is in the oven. Set the temperature to 350 degrees and cook for about five minutes. This will add a nice crust and help the last bit of liquid evaporate.

How to Serve Paella

Paella is usually presented in the pan at the table. “There’s also a science of how you’re going to serve it,” Lugo says. “The middle is going to have more moisture than the edges.” Lugo likes to divide a triangular portion, mix the center with the edges to blend it all together, and spoon some onto each plate along with some alioli(aka aioli), a common accompaniment for paella.

Photos by Rey Lopez.

Written by Lani Furbank

Lani Furbank is a freelance food, drinks, and lifestyle writer based in the D.C. area. She was born and raised in Northern Virginia, but stays true to her Welsh-Taiwanese heritage by exploring new places and experimenting with recipes from around the world.

Источник: https://guide.michelin.com/us/en/california/article/dining-in/how-to-make-paella-chef-daniel-lugo

Jaleo

Time Out says

The first of five concepts that acclaimed chef José Andrés plans to launch in Chicago, Jaleo is an extension of the contemporary Spanish restaurants of the same name that operate in Washington D.C., Orlando and Las Vegas. Inspired by the traditional dishes of Andrés's childhood, the menu includes tapas, paellas, sangrias and Spanish wines—all served in a casual dining room decorated with bold red tones and honeycomb patterns.

Diners can choose from one of two tasting menus focused around contemporary and traditional tapas, or order from the expansive à la carte menu. Highlights include head-on shrimp prepared with garlic and olive oil and paella made with a selection of seasonal vegetables—plus two varieties of sangria served by the pitcher. The Chicago outpost of Jaleo also features some city-specific experiences including paellas created tableside and a full tapas bar.

In the coming months, a speakeasy-style bar called Pigtail is scheduled to open alongside Jaleo, offering a menu of cocktails and bites that can be experienced on their own or as a prelude to dinner at the Spanish restaurant.

Posted:

Details

Static map showing venue location
Address: 500 N Clark St
Chicago
60654
Transport: El stop: Red to Grand, Brown and Purple to Merchandise Mart, Blue, Green, Pink and Orange to Clark and Lake.
Contact:

www.jaleo.com

Opening hours: Wed, Thu 4–10pm; Fri, Sat 4–11pm; Sun 4–10pm
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Источник: https://www.timeout.com/chicago/restaurants/jaleo

A celebrity chef reveals how a mundane chore from his dad turned into a powerful career lesson

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  • Chef José Andrés grew up in Spain, cooking massive pots of paella with his father.
  • At the time, his dad wouldn't let him do anything but tend the fire: gather the wood, build it, stoke it, manage it.
  • Once he became an expert at managing the fire, his father told him that was the key to cooking anything.
  • Now, he's a chef with two Michelin stars and 26 restaurants.

Before he won two Michelin stars, before he owned 26 restaurants, and before he became known for introducing Americans to tapas, José Andrés was the boy in charge of tending the fire.

It wasn't something he enjoyed doing — though looking back now, he sees how it helped launch his career as a celebrity chef.

On an episode of Business Insider's podcast, "Success! How I Did It," Andrés shared the story with Business Insider US editor-in-chief Alyson Shontell:

"My father would cook, and he would cook paella, the Spanish dish that is becoming world famous. And he would make big paellas for 50, 100 people at times. He would make it over open fire, and he would always put me in charge of helping him with the fire. But I wanted to cook, I wanted to stir the pot, I wanted to put the spoon in. And he never let me. 'You gather the wood; you make the fire.'

"It was a complicated thing. At times, you needed this low fire, at times a very heavy fire, and at times you had to make room underneath, then take all the charcoal away. And I was very young doing that, and I became very good at it. And then he came and told me, 'My son, I don't know if you realized, but you've been doing the most important thing, something nobody else could do like you, and you want to learn to cook. I get it. But you need to control the fire. Learn to control the fire, and you'll be able to cook anything.'"

Listen to the full episode here, or listen later with the buttons below:

This wasn't what the teenage Andrés wanted to hear. But as an adult, he gets where his father was coming from. In a story titled "Boiling Point," included in the 2006 collection "How I Learned to Cook" and reprinted on NPR, Andrés wrote:

"Now that I'm a grown man, I know that he was [right]. I've been cooking — not just making the fire — for twenty years, and I understand that every inglorious step, from the most rudimentary chopping and prepping to cleaning up at the end of the night, is important. And that in order to reach the point where you get to be the one stirring the paella, you've got to master each step along the way."

In the interview with Shontell, Andrés drew a parallel between learning to cook and becoming an expert at anything:

"This, to me, is a very powerful story because it's beyond cooking. It's a story that goes on exactly who we are, where we want to go, where we come from, and sometimes we want to do the cooking, but we don't know what the heck is our fire. I always ask myself, 'What's my fire today?' Then the cooking is so simple."

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Источник: https://www.businessinsider.com/how-chef-jose-andres-learned-to-cook-2017-10

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REVIEW: We Stuffed Ourselves With Carbs and Cheese (But NOT Tiny Cokes!) at Jaleo in Disney World!

By Sara McOmber1 Comment

We’re heading back to Jaleo by Chef José Andréstoday! We haven’t been back since the restaurant reopened the huntington national bank inc Disney Springs last August, so we are ready to get stuffed with paella, cheese croquetas, and sangria again.

Jaleo in Disney Springs

In the past, we’ve really enjoyed the delicious tapas and unique eats at Jaleo in Disney Springs. Let’s take a look at some old favorites and what’s different now at this restaurant!

[Read more…]

Filed Under: disney restaurant review, Disney Springs, Featured, Table-Service, Walt Disney WorldTagged With: Art's Fabulous Fried Chicken, Charcuterie Board, cheese plate, Chef José Andrés, chicken croquetas, chicken croquettes, Chorizo, chorizo casero con pure de patatas al aceite de olivia, cono de queso de cabre con marmelada de tomate, Croquetas de Pollo, disney world seafood, disney world tapas, five quesos, goats cheese cone, goats cheese cone with tomato marmalade, ham at jaleo, Jaleo, Jaleo by Chef Jose Andres, Jaleo by José Andrés, Jaleo Disney Springs, jaleo review, jamon iberico de bellota cortado a mano, paella, paella and rice, paella y arroces, pan con chocolate, Patatas Bravas, sangria de cava, seafood, selection of cheese, Tapas, tomato bread

Jeff Bezos Awards Disney World Restaurant Chef and Owner $100 Million

By Sara McOmber1 Comment

Chef José Andrés is the owner and creator of Jaleo, which has a location inside Disney Springs!

Jaleo in Disney Springs

And Jeff Bezos, the founder of Amazon, has just awarded Andrés for his humanitarian and unifying efforts with $100 million. This new award is called the “Courage and Civility Award.” [Read more…]

Filed Under: Disney News, Disney Springs, Featured, NewsTagged With: 100 million, Chef José Andrés, courage and civility award, disney springs jaleo, Jaleo, jeff bezos, jeff bezos award, jose andres, jose andres award, jose andres jaleo, jose andres nobel prize nomination, jose andres world central kitchen

Jaleo to Reopen on Select Days in Disney Springs Beginning TODAY

By Janelle SheetzLeave a Comment

When we found out several third party stores and restaurants would be welcoming guests back on May 20th, we knew Jaleo by Chef José Andrés would not be among them.

Jaleo

The signature restaurant known for its modern Spanish cuisine has remained shuttered since March and shut down right before celebrating its 1-year anniversary at Disney World with a Paella Block Party!

[Read more…]

Filed Under: Disney News, Everbank locations jacksonville fl Springs, Featured, Table-Service, Walt Disney WorldTagged With: Chef José Andrés, Closures, dinner, disney springs, Disney World, Jaleo, reopening, restaurant, Signature Dining, spanish

7 Pieces of ❤️GOOD NEWS❤️ From Disney So Far

By Carly Terzigni4 Comments

If you're looking for information related to the current closures and their effect on the Disney Parks, click here for all the up-to-date details and click here for answers to dozens of reader FAQs.

 

Disney has brought a smile to our face in a lot of ways over the last few weeks. Whether it’s reading us bedtime stories or streaming live on Facebook, Disney performers and celebrities have come into our homes digitally in ways that have brought some joy to these uncertain times. But these aren’t the only ways they’re making us smile.

©Disney

There has been so much GOOD NEWS to celebrate coming from this crisis. Therefore, we want to share seven of our favorite stories with you today!

[Read more…]

Filed Under: Featured, Walt Disney WorldTagged With: Aulani, Chef José Andrés, disney donates, disney springs, Disney World, Disneyland, Easter, easter lilies, Jaleo, jose andres, Orlando, Orlando Police Department, second harvest

Jaleo’s Disney Springs Team Delivers HUNDREDS of Free Meals to Families in Need!

By Carly TerzigniLeave a Comment

If you're looking for jose bautista stats related to the current closures and their effect on the Disney Parks, click here for all the up-to-date details and click here for answers to dozens of reader FAQs.

These past few weeks have been nothing short of challenging for many communities across the country.

Jaleo

During this strange time, we’re seeing individuals stepping up in incredible ways, and one of those fantastic individuals is Chef José Andrés!

[Read more…]

Filed Under: Disney Springs, Featured, Special Stuff, Walt Disney WorldTagged With: Chef José Andrés, disney springs, Jaleo, Jaleo by Chef Jose Andres

Are Disney World Restaurants Really Just Firing Everyone?! It’s Much More Complicated Than You Think.

By Jessica Hogan23 Comments

When Disney World announced it would be temporarily closing, they noted they would continue paying full-time Cast Members who were unable to go to work.

Disney World Will Be Closed For At Least Two Weeks

But what does this closure and the current restaurant restrictions mean for employees of third-party-owned businesses on property? This is certainly a tough time for the world, but for those in service industries, it will be downright devastating.[Read more…]

Filed Under: Counter-Service, Disney News, disney parks, Disney Springs, Featured, News, Table-ServiceTagged With: cast members, chef andres, Chef Art Smith, Chef José Andrés, disney springs, Homecomin, Jaleo, laid off, let go, restaurants, staff, unemployed, unpaid

Some Jaleo Restaurants are Temporarily Closing Due to Health Concerns

By Brianna LeCompteLeave a Comment

With the parks at Disney World preparing to close amid coronavirus concerns, some Disney Springs locations are still considering next steps.

Jaleo

As of press time, Disney Springs will remain open during the park closure, but some individual locations are still choosing to temporarily shut their how many cameras can vivint support. Some stores have announced that they will be temporarily closedand House of Bluesis cancelling several scheduled events. Another location that might be impacted is the Spanish restaurant, Jaleo.

[Read more…]

Filed Under: Disney Springs, Featured, Walt Disney WorldTagged With: Chef José Andrés, disney springs, Jaleo, Jaleo by Chef Jose Andres

Here’s Your Chance To Win FREE Tickets to Jaleo’s Paella Block Party in Disney Springs!

By Janelle Sheetz105 Comments

UPDATE: Due to Coronavirus concerns, Jaleo has decided to reschedule this event for the fall so we will be delaying the giveaway until a later time. We will update you as soon as we know more information. All guests who already purchased tickets are being notified.

You may remember it was almost one year ago that Chef Jose Andres opened his restaurant Jaleo in Disney Springs (click here to reminisce with us a little!).

Chef Jose Andres at Jaleo in Disney Springs

And to celebrate their 1-year anniversary, these New Kids on the Block are celebrating the best way they know how — by throwing a Paella Block Party!

[Read more…]

Filed Under: Disney Springs, Featured, Table-Service, Walt Disney WorldTagged With: Chef José Andrés, disney springs, Disney World, free tickets, Giveaway, Jaleo, jaleo paella block party, paella, prize

A Paella Block Party Is Coming to Jaleo in Disney Springs!

By AJ and the DFB TeamLeave a Comment

UPDATE: Due to Coronavirus concerns, Jaleo has decided to reschedule this event for the fall. We will update you as soon as we know more information. All guests who already purchased tickets are being notified.

Saturday, March 21st will bring a Paella Block Party to Disney Springs!

Jaleo at Disney Springs

What’s the occasion? Jaleo by Chef José Andrés is “taking over the sidewalk on Disney Spring’s West Side” and opening up the restaurant to celebrate the signature spot’s one-year anniversary and very first Paella Block Party! [Read more…]

Filed Under: Disney Springs, Featured, Table-Service, Walt Disney WorldTagged With: Chef José Andrés, disney springs, Jaleo, Jaleo by Chef Jose Andres, paella, Paella Block Party

A 6-Course Truffle Dinner Is Coming to Disney World Next Month and It’s FANCY FANCY!

By Janelle SheetzLeave a Comment

While it isn’t hard to find ways to spoil yourself at Disney World (we’re talkin’ ice cream for breakfast, riding Pirates of the Caribbean over and over again…) we just discovered a new dining experience that will be coming soon to Disney World!

Jaleo

And if this dinner is as off-the-chain as it sounds, it’s going to be one VERY cool experience, indeed!

[Read more…]

Filed Under: Disney News, Disney Springs, Featured, Special Stuff, Walt Disney WorldTagged With: black truffle, Chef José Andrés, disney springs, Disney World, Jaleo, Jaleo by Chef Jose Andres, jose andres, truffle and wine dinner

Источник: https://www.disneyfoodblog.com/tag/chef-jose-andres/

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Источник: https://foodstusr.blogspot.com/2021/03/paella-recipe-jose-andres.html

Printed inside the front cover of José Andrés’s cookbook Made in Spain is the line: “I won’t be happy until there is a paella pan on every backyard grill in America.” While it certainly isn’t an easy dish, Chase bank mortgage clause address believes paella can—and should—be made and enjoyed at home.

At his flagship Spanish restaurant, Jaleo, in Washington, D.C., paellas for a crowd are made to order and served tableside. The Bethesda location also offers public and private classes to teach guests how to prepare the classic dish for themselves.

Though Daniel Lugo, head chef of the Bethesda Jaleo, is Puerto Rican with Spanish heritage, he credits Andrés with teaching him about paella while working at the now-shuttered Mi Casa in Puerto Rico. “That’s when I truly learned the art of cooking paella," he says. "Trust me, I thought I knew how to cook paella.”

Here, he shares some of the expertise he's gained over the years.

What Is Paella?

There’s much debate about what you can and can’t call a paella. Paella Valenciana is the original, made with a traditional set of ingredients including rabbit, chicken and beans. “People from Valencia are very [protective of] their paellas, so everything else that is not that paella they call arrozarrozmade in a paella pan,” Lugo explains.

For everyone except diehard Valencians, you can broaden the definition a bit. “If you cook it in a paella pan, you’re safe to call it a paella.”

Equipment and Ingredients for Paella

“The first thing you’re going to need is, of course, a paella pan. Because without a paella pan, it’s jose andres paella a paella,” Lugo says. Paella pans are wide, shallow and flat-bottomed, allowing you to spread the rice out for even cooking.

The size of the pan is especially important. A 12-inch pan is very manageable and can cook one cup of rice. Lugo recommends the brand Pata Negra, but says you can also find lower-cost options from Amazon.

The heat source on which you cook the paella also matters. Lugo says a gas flame offers the most consistency, whether it’s a stovetop burner, a gas grill or an outdoor paella ring. More adventurous home cooks could choose to cook over a fire pit or a charcoal grill, but it requires more skill to control the heat.

If your only option is an electric stove, you’ll want to use a smaller six-inch paella pan and finish it in the oven, which will ensure the dish cooks evenly and at the right speed.

Rice is another key factor that can make or break your paella, and Lugo recommends Spanish bomba rice. Bomba is a short grain rice that can absorb three to four times its volume in stock, producing a more concentrated flavor, which lays the foundation of the dish. (Arborio rice is not an adequate substitute because it is too starchy and can’t absorb as much liquid.) You can find it at Spanish grocers or at high-end stores like Whole Foods. “It’s a little bit on the pricey side, but I’m telling you, it’s totally worth it,” he says.

Another flavor boost comes from salmorra, which is a blend of ñora peppers, tomatoes and garlic. “Personally I add this to any paella that I make at home. This will be like the bomb of flavor,” Lugo says. If you can’t find ñora peppers, you could use sofrito instead—a sauce of tomatoes, onion, garlic and peppers—for a similar effect.

With the base of the paella established, you can add pretty much anything you like. Just follow the ratio of one cup of uncooked rice to four cups of add-ins.

How to Cook Paella

Lugo says one of the most important ingredients for a paella is patience. “It takes a lot of time, and there are certain times that you cannot touch it,” he says. “If you move the paella, the rice will release the starch and then the liquid is going to be too thick and it will not cook the rice the right way.” Unlike risotto, stirring is the enemy of a paella.

You also want to make sure to have your mise en place set before you start cooking. “At the beginning, it’s a lot of quick processes. If you don’t have your ingredients ready, you might burn it or you’re going to have to turn down the fire and it’s not going to be the same.”

Depending on what ingredients you add to your paella, the start of the process will vary. For seafood, you should sear it in olive oil and set it aside, and then return it to the pan when the rice is almost done, letting the steam from the rice finish cooking the seafood. For meat (like chicken or rabbit) or vegetables, you’ll sear them and then push them to the outside of the pan to cook along with the rice, stock and other ingredients.

Lugo prefers to add the stock before the rice because it yields a more consistent result. “If you’re searing the rice, you’re basically starting the cooking process, and then you add the stock and it’s going to change the temperature of the paella,” he says.

You can add the rice once the stock is at a jose andres paella. “You don’t want to dump it in on one side,” Lugo cautions. “You want to sprinkle it like salt,” which will ensure even cooking.

Shake the pan gently to evenly distribute the ingredients and let it simmer on high. “You’re going to get nervous, you’re going to be like ‘oh my god, is it going to burn,’ but like I said, patience.”

Watch the pan closely to see where the stock is bubbling more rigorously. Occasionally rotate the pan to distribute the heat and allow best high yield savings rates sections of the pan to cook evenly.

After the liquid starts to thicken and you're able to see the rice emerge from the stock, turn the heat down to medium and don’t stir or move the rice. “It’s going to create this little barrier,” Lugo says. “That is basically creating like a little oven, which the rice is cooking underneath. If you move it, you’re disturbing the process.” Continue to decrease the heat as the liquid is absorbed by the rice.

Temperatures are critical throughout the cooking process. “If we leave it on high, the liquid is going to evaporate faster than the rice cooks, but then again, if we add the stock and we always keep it on low, the rice is going to cook faster than the liquid evaporates.”

From the point when you add the rice, it will take about 20 minutes to cook. “We cannot rush this process,” he says. You want the rice to have a little bite to it. “In the U.S., most people like the paella overcooked, but you should be able to feel the grain. You don’t want it to be too mushy.”

Near the end of the cooking, you want to create a socarrat, or a layer of crispy rice stuck to the bottom of the pan. To do this, turn the heat up to high and listen. “One of the things that José always teaches is the paella talks to you,” Lugo says. “You can hear those little bubbles; it’s telling you that the liquid is evaporating, and little by little, it’s creating that socarratthat we want. Once we can hear those bubbles, it means it’s almost done.”

The sound will get louder as the socarratforms, but take care not to burn it at this stage. Test the crispiness of jose andres paella bottom layer by inserting a spoon and feeling the texture against the pan.

The easiest way to finish a paella—especially if you’re using an electric stove—is in the oven. Set the temperature to 350 degrees and cook for about five minutes. This will add a nice crust and help the last bit of liquid evaporate.

How to Serve Paella

Paella is usually presented in the pan at the table. “There’s also a science of how you’re going to serve it,” Lugo says. “The middle is going to have more moisture than the edges.” Lugo likes to divide a triangular portion, mix the center with the edges to blend it all together, and spoon some onto each plate along with some alioli(aka aioli), a common accompaniment for paella.

Photos by Rey Lopez.

Written by Lani Furbank

Lani Furbank is a freelance food, drinks, and lifestyle writer based in the D.C. area. She was born and raised in Northern Virginia, but stays true to her Welsh-Taiwanese heritage by exploring new places and experimenting with recipes from around the world.

Источник: https://guide.michelin.com/us/en/california/article/dining-in/how-to-make-paella-chef-daniel-lugo

A celebrity chef reveals how a mundane chore from his dad turned into a powerful career lesson

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This story is available exclusively to Insider subscribers. Become an Insider and start reading now.

  • Chef José Andrés grew up in Spain, cooking massive pots of paella with his father.
  • At the time, his dad wouldn't let him do anything but tend the fire: gather the wood, build it, stoke it, manage it.
  • Once he became an expert at managing the fire, his father told him that was the key to cooking anything.
  • Now, he's a chef with two Michelin stars and 26 restaurants.

Before he won two Michelin stars, before he owned 26 restaurants, and before he became known for introducing Americans to tapas, José Andrés was the boy in charge of tending the fire.

It wasn't something he enjoyed doing — though looking back now, he sees how it helped launch his career as a celebrity chef.

On an episode of Business Insider's podcast, "Success! How I Did It," Andrés shared the story with Business Insider US editor-in-chief Alyson Shontell:

"My father would cook, and he would cook paella, the Spanish dish that is becoming world famous. And he would make big paellas for 50, 100 people at times. He would make it over open fire, and he would always put me in charge of helping him with the fire. But I wanted to cook, I wanted to stir the pot, I wanted to put the spoon in. And he never let me. 'You gather the wood; you make the fire.'

"It was a complicated thing. At times, you needed this low fire, at times a very heavy fire, and at times you nevada state bank hours near me to make room underneath, then take all the charcoal away. And I was very young doing that, and I became very good at it. And then he came and told me, 'My son, I don't know if you realized, but you've been doing the most important thing, something nobody else could do like you, and you want to learn to cook. I get it. But you need to control the fire. Learn to control the fire, and you'll be able to cook anything.'"

Listen to the full episode here, or listen later with the buttons below:

This wasn't what the teenage Andrés wanted to hear. But as an adult, he gets where his father was coming from. In a story titled "Boiling Point," included in the 2006 collection "How I Learned to Cook" and reprinted on NPR, Andrés wrote:

"Now that I'm a grown man, I know that he was [right]. I've been cooking — not just making the fire — for twenty years, and I understand that every inglorious step, from the most rudimentary chopping and prepping to cleaning up at the end of the night, is important. And that in order to reach the point where you get to be the one stirring the paella, you've got to master each step along the way."

In the interview with Shontell, Andrés drew a parallel between learning to cook and becoming an expert at anything:

"This, to me, is a very powerful story because it's beyond cooking. It's a story that goes on exactly who we are, where we want to go, where we come from, and sometimes we want to do the cooking, but we don't know what the heck is our fire. I always ask myself, 'What's my fire today?' Then the cooking is so simple."

A picture of a switch and lightbulb

jose andres paella Sign up for notifications from Insider! Stay up to date with what you want to know.

Subscribe to push notifications

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More:Jose AndresChefSuccess! How I Did ItParenting

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Источник: https://www.businessinsider.com/how-chef-jose-andres-learned-to-cook-2017-10

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Jaleo

Time Out says

The first of five concepts that acclaimed chef José Andrés plans to launch in Chicago, Jaleo is an extension of the contemporary Spanish restaurants of the same name that operate in Washington D.C., Orlando and Las Vegas. Inspired by the traditional dishes of Andrés's childhood, the menu includes tapas, paellas, sangrias and Spanish wines—all served in a casual dining room decorated with bold red tones and honeycomb patterns.

Diners can choose from one of two tasting menus focused around contemporary and traditional tapas, or order from the expansive à la carte menu. Highlights include head-on shrimp prepared with garlic and olive oil and paella made with a selection of seasonal vegetables—plus two varieties of sangria served by the pitcher. The Chicago outpost of Jaleo also features some city-specific experiences including paellas created tableside and a full tapas bar.

In the coming months, a speakeasy-style bar called Pigtail is scheduled to open alongside Jaleo, offering a menu amazon individual hand sanitizer cocktails and bites that can be experienced on their own or as a prelude to dinner at the Spanish restaurant.

Jose andres paella

Details

Static map showing venue location
Address: 500 N Clark St
Chicago
60654
Transport: El stop: Red to Grand, Brown and Purple to Merchandise Mart, Blue, Green, Pink and Orange to Clark and Lake.
Contact:

jose andres paella www.jaleo.com

Opening hours: Wed, Thu 4–10pm; Fri, Sat 4–11pm; Sun 4–10pm
Do you own this business?
Best selling Time Out Offers
Источник: https://www.timeout.com/chicago/restaurants/jaleo
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2 Replies to “Jose andres paella”

  1. That sucks! Why charge fees for savings account?! They are literally made to stack money!

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