brian story

COPS hunting for Brian Laundrie have claimed his parents story has “a lot of oddness” and contained “things that don't make sense”. Brian Story's account of skiing and more in Western Montana. Route Descriptions. Home, Mission range ski routes · Bitterroot range ski routes. Brian's care at the UPMC Sports Medicine Concussion Program helped him understand why he had such a complex recovery. It was due to some of his personal and.

Brian story -

"Richly documented and elegantly written, Land Wars reveals the contradictions and ironies intrinsic to the Chinese Communist Party's theory and practice of land reform. A welcome addition to the literature on the Communist revolution, it offers a counter narrative to the stories told in William Hinton's Fanshen in many ways."

—Huaiyin Li, University of Texas at Austin

"Land Wars successfully challenges still deeply-entrenched Chinese Communist mythologies about the nature and dynamics of the 1945-1952 land reform. DeMare's penetrating discussion of ferocious, ritualized class struggle campaigns skillfully demonstrates how land reform was not about economic change. This book is essential reading for anyone interested in the imposition of Communist political control at the grassroots."

—Paul G. Pickowicz, Distinguished Professor Emeritus of History and Chinese Studies, University of California, San Diego

"DeMare handles the topic of land reform in a refreshing way, using skillful story-telling....[His] compelling land reform research is no doubt methodologically innovative and of great significance in uncovering untold stories of rural China's grassroots revolution."

—Shaofan An, Journal of Chinese History

"The socialist practices in the early People's Republic of China have received ample scholarly attention in recent years. Brian DeMare's Land Wars is a very thorough, thought-provoking study that complicates extant literature and will certainly deepen readers' understanding of the essence of Chinese socialism."

—Guo Wu, Journal of Asian Studies

Источник: https://www.sup.org/books/title/?id=30630

My Prostate Cancer Story: Brian Custer

“As men, we have this ego … we think we’re too macho to go to the doctor and undergo this type of check-up,” says Custer. “But the truth is: If you don’t get checked, you’re cheating your family out of having a husband or father around. And you’re cheating yourself out of life.”

Custer knew something was wrong after his doctor felt a lump on his prostate during a routine screening. “After a few tests, my doctor told me, ‘Brian, you’ve got cancer and it’s very aggressive…you need surgery as soon as possible.’” That was the summer of 2013. Custer was 42 years old.

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At first, Custer questioned whether surgery was the best option. His doctor’s reply was sobering. “Without surgery, you’ll probably die within a year or two.”

Telling his family was hard. Custer and his wife of 14 years, Carmen, have three sons. At the time, the boys were 10, eight and three years old. His middle son asked, “Does this mean you’re going to die?” This crushed Custer.

“I had to give my sons confidence,” he recalls. “I told them, ‘It’s a fight and Daddy’s a fighter. We’re going to be ok.’” Shortly after, Custer underwent surgery to have his prostate removed. Today he is cancer free and continues to get tested every three months.

For Prostate Cancer Awareness Month in September 2015, Custer partnered with PCF to create a public service announcement about his experience. He believes organizations like PCF are important to increase awareness and connect people to inspiring stories. “I hope when people hear my story, they’re motivated to take action by saying, ‘I’m going to get checked’ or ‘I’m going to make sure my dad, husband or son gets checked.’”

Originally published within Prostate & Urological Health campaign by Mediaplanet Publishing House Inc., September 2015

https://www.pcf.org/c/my-prostate-cancer-story-brian-custer/

Источник: https://www.pcf.org/c/my-prostate-cancer-story-brian-custer/

Brian's story

Brian's story

Brian is 64 years old. He is cheerful and courteous. He doesn’t drink alcohol or take drugs, he never has. And he has been homeless for 11 years.

For years Brian cleaned cars at a car auction in Chelmsford. He enjoyed his job. When he was made redundant, Brian contacted his local council to claim housing benefit. He believed that his claim was in place but after several months he received a bill for over £2,000 from his landlord for rent arrears. Brian was out of work and unable to pay the debt and so, at the age of 53, Brian became homeless.

For the following 11 years Brian slept in parks and on benches. For a short period he was able find a room but as time went on, mobility issues meant he could no longer climb stairs and again he was forced onto the streets.

Brian first came to the attention of Stonepillow in September 2015 when he fell over in the street in Littlehampton. He was offered accommodation at Stonepillow Lodge, which acts as Stonepillow's hospital discharge facility and for those who, like Brian, would be unable to stay in a more traditional hostel environment due to their health needs.

Brian has flourished during his time at the Lodge, with our help he is seeking medical assistance for his mobility issues and receives support from a team of carers. He is also attending a day centre in Chichester for people of retirement age which provides him with a valuable social network.

Stonepillow continues to work with Brian to help him find long term supported accommodation where he will be able to continue to gain the help and support that he so desperately needs. With the support of Stonepillow, Brian will never again have to sleep on the streets.

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Источник: https://stonepillow.org.uk/brians-story/

Brian’s Story

Nov 02, 2020By: Tim Bourret

Note: The following appears in the Boston College gameday football program.


If you asked me to pick the most productive individual performances in a game in Clemson history, the names of Tiger greats come to mind. There was C.J. Spiller’s 233 rushing yards and four touchdowns against Georgia Tech in the 2009 ACC Championship Game. There was Deshaun Watson’s performance in his last home game against South Carolina when he had six passing touchdowns and just six incompletions. And there was the night Sammy Watkins had a school-record 345 all-purpose yards at Maryland.

But on a per-play basis, you would be hard pressed to find a performance better than the one Brian Mance had against Missouri in 2000. Mance was playing just the second game of his sophomore year after seeing just 49 snaps of action as a first-year freshman in 1999.

He did not start this Missouri game and played just 16 snaps, but what a 16 snaps. In that limited action, he had two interception returns for 15 yards and a recovered fumble. He added four tackles and a 28-yard punt return. He is still the co-holder of the Clemson single-game takeaway record, and it is by far the fewest snaps for someone who has recorded three takeaways.

Clemson Tigers Official Athletics Site

With all that said, when I asked him about that contest, the first thing he mentioned was the punt return.

“I had been working on returning punts, but we had great return guys in Joe Don Reames and Travis Zachery,” said Mance recently from his home in Spartanburg. “I didn’t think I was going to get much of a chance the entire season.”

But the Tigers went up big against Missouri before winning 62-9.

“Rodney Allison (assistant coach in charge of the punt return team) yelled for me to get in there.”

That return and many other plays on special teams had a big impact on his career, because it gave him confidence.

“I was not highly recruited coming out of high school (in Manning, S.C.). Clemson was the first school to offer me during my junior year when I came to the spring game. I fell in love with the place. Coach (Brad) Scott did a great job winning over my parents.

“I was not the biggest guy in the world, and until that 2000 game against Missouri, I wondered how much I was going to be able to contribute. That game told me I could play at this level.

“Playing special teams was big for me. My freshman year, I was a gunner on the punt team and made a tackle on Peter Warrick (Florida State All-American). That was a very important play for me, because he was a great player.”

That play took place in 1999 in the first “Bowden Bowl,” a game played in front of a Memorial Stadium record crowd of 86,092 fans.

Clemson Tigers Official Athletics Site

Mance continued to contribute on special teams throughout his career. His 16.7-yard average on punt returns is second in Clemson history to “Streak” Lawton’s 17.5-yard average, one of the oldest records in the Clemson recordbook. Lawton played between 1934-36.

Mance is one of the few players to average at least 16 yards per punt return and 24 yards per kickoff return, given a minimum of 25 career punt returns and 40 career kickoff returns. He was in the top 30 in the nation in kickoff returns and punt returns in 2001.

His greatest play also took place on special teams. His 88-yard punt return for a touchdown against Georgia Tech in Death Valley in 2000 is the fifth-longest punt return in school history.

However, Mance was far more than just a return specialist. He was a “ball hawk” in the secondary and is tied for seventh in Clemson history in career interceptions (12). He started all 22 games in the secondary in both 2001 and 2002.

As a senior, he had six interceptions, all of the diving variety, as he had just one return yard. Mance added 62 tackles, including 50 first hits, and had 11 pass breakups for 17 total passes defended. He was named a fourth-team All-American and First-Team All-ACC performer by Sporting News.

“My senior year, I really wanted to put my best foot forward. I learned a lot from Coach (John) Lovett, because he added a lot of things to my tool box. I wanted to make a difference and help the team win.”

After Mance graduated from Clemson, he gave professional football a go and went to camp with the Redskins and Bears. He also played a season in NFL Europe, then played on a championship team with the Philadelphia Soul of the Arena Football League.

“They were all good experiences and part of the journey.”

Clemson Tigers Official Athletics Site

In 2009, Mance had a chance meeting with Head Coach Dabo Swinney.

“I met Coach Swinney at Gaines Adams’ funeral in Easley. He had known my dad and he asked me to work his summer camp. I had been coaching high school football.”

Swinney had been checking on Mance and heard good things. Swinney offered the former Tiger a job on his staff.

“One day during the camp, I was in the bathroom and Coach Swinney told me to come by his office.

“He started telling me about this player development job he had open and he wanted me to fill that position. I was head-over-heals excited. That is how I got started in coaching.”

Mance served in a player development role in 2010 and 2011, then was an on-field graduate assistant in 2012. He had a front-row seat for some special moments.

“I was around for turning points in the program’s history,” said Mance.

“I remember the loss to South Florida in the bowl game in Charlotte. After the game, the seniors went around the room and told the underclassmen to never let that happen again. It was very important to see those seniors take ownership of the program instead of sulking about a losing season.”

In 2013, Mance became a full-time assistant coach at North Greenville, then became a defensive backs coach for Mike Ayers’ program at Wofford.

“It was a great opportunity to work for Coach Ayers. It was like working for Bill Belichick.”

Clemson Tigers Official Athletics Site

Everything was right with the world for Mance, his wife and two-year-old son until the summer of 2016. He began to have some health issues that included headaches. They became so severe that he went to the hospital.

“I went to the emergency room and it took two weeks to diagnose. Doctors from all over the country were involved. After many tests over a long period of time, it was determined that I had a rare autoimmune disease of the nervous system.

“It was very difficult. I was basically paralyzed. It affected my lungs and I was very weak.”

Mance got some strength back in the fall, but he still had to coach virtually. He watched film and spoke with his players and fellow coaches over the phone. He could not go to the office for fear of catching a virus and was wheelchair bound.

“Coach Ayers was terrific in letting me continue to coach the cornerbacks (virtually). It was so important for me mentally to continue to stay involved with the program. It allowed me to take my mind off my physical problems.”

Clemson Tigers Official Athletics Site

Today, Mance is in remission, but he still must remain at home. He has battled through spots on his spine and lung issues, and he has had a lesion on his brain. The brain issue and the spots on his spine have cleared up.

“I had times I could barely blink because I was so weak. But I am getting stronger, doing rehab and believe I will be able to walk again. I feel like I am headed in the right direction.

“I thought Coach (Joey) Batson’s rehab was tough, but this is a different level.

“I have spoken with people who have gone through this. It is a long journey.”

One thing that keeps him going is the success of the Tigers.

“I look forward to the games every Saturday. I have become more of a fan than a former player. It is good to see those coaches I worked with be rewarded for their hard work.”

His son, now five years old, is a big Clemson fan and watches the games with his father.

“He watched the 2018 national championship game with me. He was just three at the time. After we won and were celebrating, he said to me, ‘Daddy, I’m going to play for Clemson when I turn five’.”

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Источник: https://clemsontigers.com/brians-story/

Since I couldn't ski in February or March due to a foot injury, it was a mad  scramble to get to ten 10k ski days this year, but I managed.  The 10 x 10k goal has been a fun multi year challenge, pushing for earlier starts, farther reaches, and an expansive mindset in planning and executing outings.  I think that my watch might have been a little bit off on the Sweeney loop tour, but as a fitness replacement, I did do a mid-February 10k day on the bike, so I'm sticking to my claim of pulling off a 10 x 10k ski season.

Blackmore:  Fun day lapping the most popular Northeast shoulder with Kyle.  Great snow, and the 10k goal made for an engaging day.

Whitefish Mountain resort:  Two early laps and three afternoon laps with family lift skiing in between.

Gash North bowl:   We didn't take a turn with good snow all day, but...  Really nice to get out with Ned, get to know the North bowl of Gash proper a little better, continue to find evidence of good deep stability, and appreciate 2,500 foot long runs in early January.

Ned climbing back out of the North face of Gash proper.

Snowbowl and Point 6:  Mid day Martin Luther King day family obligations necessitated a wicked early start, but motivation was high, so I rallied from L2 around 4:30 am.  To my shock, I ended up crossing Justin Angleman and Seth Swanson's headlamps after the first lap, and we took a couple of short runs at their blistering pace.  Once the ski resort opened, I headed out to Jenny bowl, put a skin track in, and hammered out runs in perfect boot top powder.

Good skiing in Jenny bowl.

Eagle Pass:  On a forecast hot April day, I was sufficiently motivated to rally proper early to beat the forecast warm up.  The goal was to ski the big South facing avalanche path off of point 8,623 near Eagle pass.  The logistics of accessing the path and climbing out out are a bit weird, but I am pretty confident the Eagle pass approach is superior to the bushwack from Post creek.  I lucked out, catching the first run with perfect firm corn, and the second with good, slightly over ripe corn.  Really glad to finally ski this run and catch good conditions.  

OK, this is going to be fun.
Climbing out under the watchful eye of McDonald.

Note:  It appears that public access to the Eagle Pass trailhead has been cut off from the Eagle Pass road.  However, it is still possible for the public to access the trailhead from the Mollman pass road by taking the west canal road all the way South to the normal trailhead.  

Calowachan:  It seemed a little bit crazy to go for 10k with a not-crack-of-anything 1030 am start, so I headed out from the Eagle pass trailhead with a plan to just see what happened.  

Panorama of the view down the Southeast face of Calowachan out to the
South Calowachan summit, Summit Lake, McDonald, etc.

To my surprise, temps were cold all day, and the skiing was delightful.  I summited the South peak four hours from leaving the car, and jumped right into an excellent run down the steep upper Southeast face and down through a long couloir directly to Summit lake.  From which it was quick to bop over to the rolling South face of the primary North summit.  I skied the South face from below the craggy summit block.  Another great run!  On the climb out to Eagle pass, there may have been a short throw away lap to get to 10k, but then it was on to the fast ski and slow Mission-lite bushwacking walk out to the car by late evening.  With cold temps and great skiing, this was a really really good day.

Great conditions in a hidden Missions gem of a ski line.

Sweeney: After deciding that the suspect forecast for the Missions might not allow for good skiing (plan A), Jeffrey and I set out early from Missoula with plans to ski in Bass creek (plan B), but to our surprise, the trailhead was closed for prescribed burning.  So we resorted to plan C and back tracked to Sweeney.  I have wanted to do a circumnavigation tour for a while, and it seemed like the day to do it, regardless of the plan letter.

Jeffrey starting a fine long corn run on the South side of Sweeney.

We were on the summit less than three hours from leaving the car.  A bit of routefinding and icy down climbing put us on top of the Northwest gullies, which we skied on firm but edgeable ice.  Then, we climbed out of One horse creek to the top of the big Southeast bowl just past the main Sweeney summit.  The ensuing corn run was perfect - long, fun, with great snow top to bottom.  Definitely the run of the day and honestly one of the corn runs of the year.  We climbed back to the summit, then took a normal run on the Northeast face before exiting.  Nice day and fun to finally get out with Jeffrey again.

Complete Mystery tour: I had some other ski ideas, but Ned and made a compelling case to ski all of the Mystery chutes at Gash, and I'm glad he did.  The day was forecast to be warm and wet, but we headed out extra early anyway with Jeffrey with hopes that the weather would work out by luck. Sure enough, we found ourselves skiing directly off of Gash proper at 8 am with good enough weather and a reasonable re freeze. 

Gash proper from the top.

We made great time climbing to the top of the Mystery chutes, and skied the central chute first.  I put a steep but efficient (if I do say so myself) track back up the chute, and we climbed all the way back to the top and picked our way into the West chute.  Ned had to ski cut heavy snow, and we had to scrap around an ice step, but it was still a fun run.  We took one last jaunt up our skin track, climbing only to the top of  the East chute.  None of us had skied the East chute, and we were delighted to find a relaxing tree lined run.  

Jeffrey in the West Mystery chute.
Ned in the mellow but excellent East Mystery chute.
We took a pretty good break in light rain before rallying up the scrappy rock lined shorter chute on the East edge of the face. Most of the climb was scrappy, but we got it done efficiently, and the skiing was also scrappy but  fun.  The climb out to Gash got a bit long.  We were way over 10k feet, it was snowing and gloppy, and I think that everyone kind of hit a low energy patch at some point.  But we persevered, and were soon making our way out to the car.  This ended up being the biggest elevation day of the year for me - something north of 12k vert I think.  
Ned climbing the last couloir of the day.

Kakashe: Keeping with the spring theme of exploring some of the lesser (i.e. not McDonald, Grey Wolf, or East Saint Mary) Mission objectives, I had a really fun day exploring the Northwest chutes on Kakashe in early May, and when another perfect weather window appeared, I was back, this time with an early enough start for a 10k day.  The goal was basically to ski around the compass on Flattop before it got too warm.  There is enough downfall that getting to and from snow line took a long time and sucked some soul, but the time spent in the alpine was delightful.  I took the short entry run, then climbed to the top of Flattop.  

Up to the summit of Flattop.

I was able to scout a safe way through the pervasive ridge line cornice and skied a good run on the East face with OK warmed powder.  Hot sun motivated a quick transition, and climb back to the summit.  Next, I skied the long Northwest couloir from the summit.  The traverse into the couloir was really steep and very much heads up, no-fall with variable snow and some tricky ridges to ski over. I took it one slow sidestep at a time, and was soon on top of the main couloir.  To my surprise, there was about foot of settled spring powder in the main couloir, and the skiing was outrageously good - probably the run of the season.  I skied all the way out to the base, then kept descending until I reached a point where it was possible to weave up through scrappy Mission terrain back to the summit.  Then a great run down the big open West face visible from the valley.  Then a short North couloir to get to 10k.  The a short up, short scrappy ski, long bushwack exit had me back at the car.  Another really really good ski day in new to me terrain.

Ready to ski the East face.  What a back drop!

The traverse into the Northwest couloir.  Can you tell that I was intimidated?

Great skiing in the Northwest couloir.

Warren + biking. 

Mini down climb in the middle of the North face ski run on Warren peak.

Justin and Jeffrey were game to rally extra early for the many-th annual (I'm thinking 12th or 13th) Warren Wallow.  We had time to do a little bit of extra skiing, so we started the day off by climbing to the top of the East couloir, which was super fun, then headed back up for the customary North face run from the summit.  The exit was kind of a blur, but we were back to town by early dinner time.  We bumped into another party of long time friends and enjoyed seeing them off and on during the day.  For some reason, I was really dragging on this outing, so thanks to Justin and Jeffrey for driving, setting the bootpacks, and generally taking up my slack.  In order to get to 10k, I biked a few road/gravel Marshall canyon laps.  I had a pounding headache and was generally feeling terrible, but I got it done, and I'm glad I did because a dry spring followed by a very warm July resulted in an unusually early end to ski season 2021.

Источник: http://mt-adventures.blogspot.com/

Brian Laundrie's parents' story has a lot of 'oddness' and things that 'didn't make sense,' police say as search for him continues

  • Brian Laundrie, the person of interest in Gabby Petito's death, has been missing since mid-September.
  • A police spokesman told NewsNation there was "a lot of oddness" in Laundrie's parents' story.
  • He said authorities were trying to figure out how Laundrie escaped while under surveillance.

Authorities searching for Brian Laundrie in Florida said there were inconsistencies and "oddness" in his parents' story.

Laundrie, 23, the sole person of interest in the death of his fiancée, Gabby Petito, has been missing since mid-September. His parents have said he went to a nature reserve in Sarasota County.

"What the family has told us is that he drove out to the park and walked out into the woods," Josh Taylor, a spokesman for the North Port Police Department, told NewsNation last week.

"I don't necessarily know what to believe anymore," Taylor added. "I think it's certainly possible that they're expressing what they know, but we'll see. I mean, this is an ongoing investigation that will continue to evolve."

The interviewer mentioned reports that Laundrie drove his Mustang to the reserve and that his parents drove it back.

"We've said from the beginning there's a lot of oddness here, a lot of things that just didn't make sense," Taylor said.

"I mean, your son walks out there — now they're saying on a Monday, you know, to report that on a Friday, and then be confused on what day that was," he added. "I mean, there are a lot of things that are odd there."

Laundrie's parents last week changed their story about which day Laundrie left, saying he'd vanished a day earlier than they'd previously told the police.

Taylor said Laundrie's father had been helping the FBI search for his son, adding that this could be a sign that his parents were trying to help investigators.

Taylor told NewsNation that authorities so far hadn't found anything related to Laundrie.

He added that "no investigation is perfect" and that the police were "working to figure out" how Laundrie managed to leave undetected during the investigation.

Taylor previously told Insider that Laundrie was under surveillance when he vanished.

Petito, 22, went missing on a "van life" cross-country road trip with Laundrie. The couple set out on July 2, and Laundrie returned home to Florida on September 1 without Petito.

Petito's family reported her missing on September 11. She was found dead on September 19 at a remote campsite in Wyoming.

Источник: https://www.insider.com/gabby-petito-brian-laundies-parents-story-has-lot-of-oddness-2021-10

Q: The Invention of Hugo Cabret combines words and pictures in a truly original way. The storytelling happens visually, unfolding like a series of film stills, and also in segments that read like a novel. When you started working on the book, which came first, writing or drawing? How did you decide which scenes to draw, and which to describe with words?

A: I started writing the book as a traditional novel, thinking it would have perhaps one drawing per chapter. But I love picture books and the idea of visual narratives, and I've wondered what would happen if you illustrated a novel like a picture book. I've experimented with this idea a little bit in some novels by other authors I've illustrated, like The Meanest Doll in the World by Ann M. Martin and Laura Godwin, as well as Our House by Pam Conrad. I created visual openings for these books, so the reader's first connection to the story is through the pictures.

I've always loved the wild rumpus in Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak, because the words disappear, the pictures take up the whole page, and we move forward in the story by turning the pages. The more I thought about this idea, the more I thought how interesting it would be to have part of The Invention of Hugo Cabret told with pictures, because the story involves the early history of cinema. The pictures would be like a series of silent movies running throughout the book, helping to tell the story. When I got this idea, I had to go back and take OUT all the text that I was going to replace with pictures. I wrote long lists of what I wanted each picture to be in each visual sequence and then made small dummy books of those visual sequences to make sure that the story was getting across in the pictures.

Q: You have written other books, but you are mostly known for your work as an illustrator. Working as both author and illustrator here, was there anything that surprised you about the writing process?

A: Well, everything surprises me about the writing process because illustrating comes much more naturally to me than writing does. I love illustrating for other writers because I am given stories I never would have thought of, and my work as an illustrator is always in support of the story. When I am making up the story myself, I often have no idea what will happen next or what a story is about, and it takes me a very long time to figure it out. I ask myself lots of questions and I work with really good editors who help me along and give me guidance when I need it, which is most of the time. Sometimes it takes me a long time to figure out something that is central to the story, but once I finally figure it out it becomes hard to imagine the story without it. For instance, I didn't know that Hugo's father had died until I had been working on the story for over a year. But once I realized that, many things fell into place.

Q: The story is partly inspired by Georges Méliès, an early French filmmaker whom some people credit with making the first ever science fiction films. When did you first see one of his films? What aspects of Georges Méliès's work and life story seemed to you like good starting points for a work of fiction for children?

A: I don't remember when I first saw A Trip to the Moon, Georges Méliès's most famous movie, but I do remember loving it. It's a silent movie made in 1902 and it's funny and beautiful and strange. I thought it would be great to one day write a story about the man who made this movie, but that idea sat in the back of my head for over ten years. I eventually learned about a book called Edison's Eve: A Magical History of the Quest for Mechanical Life by Gaby Wood, about the history of automata, which are wind-up mechanical figures that often seem to be alive. Gaby wrote a chapter about Méliès, who owned a collection of automata that he donated to a museum when he could no longer afford to keep them. The museum didn't take care of them and they were destroyed and thrown away. I imagined a boy finding one of those automata, and that's how the story began.

Méliès began his career as a magician, and he always filmed his movies as if they were stage productions an audience would sit and watch. He was a great artist who lost everything and was rediscovered at the end of his life and celebrated once again. His use of magic, his belief in the power of imagination, and the joy he experienced as he created his art seemed to me the kinds of things that kids would understand.

Q: What kind of research did you do while you were creating The Invention of Hugo Cabret?

A: I read a lot of books and I traveled to Paris three times to research the book. I walked around the streets where Méliès lived at the end of his life, and I photographed everything. Also, when I'm researching a book I like to talk to people who are experts on the subjects I am writing about or illustrating. I talked to lots of experts for this book. I talked to a young man who owns a clock shop in New York that his father founded many years ago, and I talked to scholars of film history. I also talked to a man named Andy Baron who is a mechanical genius. Like Hugo, he's able to fix just about any kind of machine, and he gave me lots of advice about how machines work, what they are made of, and what tools Hugo would have needed to fix them. 

Q: Do you see yourself in any of your characters? Which one(s) and why?

A: I guess I see a part of myself in everyone I write about. I tend to write about kids who are obsessed with something, and even though I have never been good with machines the way Hugo is, I did love miniature things when I was a kid. I made entire cities out of twigs in the woods behind my house, and I liked building models.

Q: What were some of your favorite books when you were young? Does The Invention of Hugo Cabret remind you of them, or relate to them in any way?

A: One of my favorite books was The Borrowers by Mary Norton, about a family of little people that lived beneath the floorboards of a kid's room. I thought it was a true story. I made miniature furniture for the Borrowers who lived in MY room, and left it out for them to use. I also loved several picture books by Remy Charlip, including Fortunately, Thirteen, and Handtalk, which is how I learned the sign language alphabet. A few years ago I became friends with Remy Charlip and I noticed that he looks like the photos I've seen of Georges Méliès. I asked Remy if he would pose as Georges Méliès in my book, and he said yes! So remember, every time you see a drawing of Georges Méliès in The Invention of Hugo Cabret, it's really a picture of Remy Charlip. I also really liked stories about Harry Houdini when I was a kid, and I loved seeing movies about him (my first book, The Houdini Box, was about him), so The Invention of Hugo Cabret isn't really like any of the books I read as a kid, but it touches on subjects that have interested me my whole life.

Q: You reference a lot of films in the book — not just films by Georges Méliès, but ones by by other directors, too. Can you tell us more about the movies you watched as you were working on this book? Did any of them help inspire your storytelling, or the look of your drawings?

A: One of the most wonderful parts of working on this book was that it gave me an opportunity to watch many early French films that I had never seen before. I started by watching as many movies by Georges Méliès as I could find. Then I watched movies that were made in or about 1931, when my story takes place. This was around the same time that synchronized sound was introduced to the movies (before that all movies were silent). Some directors, like René Clair, did very experimental things with sound which I found really interesting. Clair made a wonderful movie called Under the Roofs of Paris, and I reference that movie in the very first line of The Invention of Hugo Cabret: "The story I am about to tell you takes place in 1931, under the roofs of Paris."

I also fell in love with the work of Jean Vigo, who made a movie about a rebellion in a boy's boarding school called Zero for Conduct. And I watched many, many films by François Truffaut, who came a little later but who made some movies that really influenced my writing and drawing, especially The 400 Blows, which is about a twelve-year-old boy who runs away and tries to live on his own.

The drawings in The Invention of Hugo Cabret are filled with visual references to all these movies, and many of the characters' names come from the films as well. For example, check out the name of the café that Hugo walks past as he heads to the French Film Academy.

Q: What do you want readers to come away with when they read this book?

A: Well, what I'm trying to do is to make a fun and unusual story about situations and characters and historical events that really interest me. I hope readers will like following Hugo's adventures, and I hope they will enjoy learning about the history of movies, and automata, and the city of Paris. I also hope that readers will enjoy how the story is told, with the combination of words and pictures all blending together into a single cinematic narrative.

Q: For readers who want more after they finish the book, do you have any suggestions of other things to read or explore?

A: It would be great if readers picked up some of the books that I read and movies that I saw when I was working on The Invention of Hugo Cabret. If you haven't read any books by Remy Charlip, you should immediately go to a bookstore and ask for some. Older kids and adults should read Edison's Eve by Gaby Wood if they are interested in automata, and they should see some of the movies I've mentioned.

Q: Any ideas about what's next for you?

A: I know I'll be illustrating some books by other authors, and I'm beginning to think about a new book I'll be writing and illustrating myself, but it's in the very early stages right now. I'm reading and thinking about the subject, and hopefully I'll begin to start writing soon. I don't know how it will be illustrated, but that's always one of the fun challenges of making a book...figuring out the best way to tell the story.

Источник: https://www.scholastic.com/teachers/articles/teaching-content/brian-selznick-gives-us-inside-story-invention-hugo-cabret/
brian story

Brian’s Story

Nov 02, 2020By: Tim Bourret

Note: The following appears in the Boston College gameday football program.


If you asked me to pick the most productive individual performances in a game in Clemson history, the names of Tiger greats come to mind. There was C.J. Spiller’s 233 rushing yards and four touchdowns against Georgia Tech in the 2009 ACC Championship Game. There was Deshaun Watson’s brian story in his last home game against South Carolina when he had six passing touchdowns and just six incompletions. And there was the night Sammy Watkins had a school-record 345 all-purpose yards at Maryland.

But on a per-play basis, you would be hard pressed to find a performance better than the one Brian Mance had against Missouri in 2000. Mance was playing just the second game of his sophomore year after seeing just 49 snaps of action as a first-year freshman in 1999.

He did not start this Missouri game and played just 16 snaps, but what a 16 snaps. In that limited action, he had two interception returns for 15 yards and a recovered fumble. He added four tackles and a 28-yard punt return. He is still the co-holder of the Clemson single-game takeaway record, and it is by far the fewest snaps for someone who has recorded three takeaways.

us calendar holidays 2020 alt="Clemson Tigers Official Athletics Site">

With all that said, when I asked him about that contest, the first thing he mentioned was the punt return.

“I had been working on returning punts, but we had great return guys in Joe Don Reames and Travis Zachery,” said Mance recently from his home in Spartanburg. “I didn’t think I was going to get much of a chance the entire season.”

But the Tigers went up big against Missouri before winning 62-9.

“Rodney Allison (assistant coach in charge of the punt return team) yelled for me to get in there.”

That return and many other plays on special teams had a big impact on his career, because it gave him confidence.

“I was not highly recruited coming out of high school (in Manning, S.C.). Clemson was the first school to offer me during my junior year when I came to the spring game. I fell in love with the place. Coach (Brad) Scott did a great job winning over my parents.

“I was not the biggest guy in the world, and until that 2000 game against Missouri, I wondered how much I was going to be able to contribute. That game told me I could play at this level.

“Playing special teams was big for me. My freshman year, I was a gunner on the punt team and made a tackle on Peter Warrick (Florida State All-American). That was a very important play for me, because he was a great player.”

That play took place in 1999 in the first “Bowden Bowl,” a game played in front of a Memorial Stadium record crowd of 86,092 fans.

Clemson Tigers Official Athletics Site

Mance continued to contribute on special teams throughout his career. His 16.7-yard average on punt returns is second in Clemson history to “Streak” Lawton’s 17.5-yard average, one of the oldest records in the Clemson recordbook. Lawton played between 1934-36.

Mance is one of the few players to average at least 16 yards per punt return and 24 yards per kickoff return, given a minimum of 25 career punt returns and 40 career kickoff returns. He was in the top 30 in the nation in kickoff returns and punt returns in 2001.

His greatest play also took place on special teams. His 88-yard punt return for a touchdown against Georgia Tech in Death Valley in 2000 is the fifth-longest punt return in school history.

However, Mance was far more than just a return specialist. He was a “ball hawk” in the secondary and is tied for seventh in Clemson history in career interceptions (12). He started all 22 games in the secondary in both 2001 and 2002.

As a senior, he had six interceptions, all of the diving variety, as he had just one return yard. Mance added 62 can i access my old hotmail account, including 50 first hits, and had 11 pass breakups for 17 total passes defended. He was named a fourth-team All-American and First-Team All-ACC performer by Sporting News.

“My senior year, I really wanted to put my best foot forward. I learned a lot from Coach (John) Lovett, because he added a lot of things to my tool box. I wanted to make a difference and help the team win.”

After Mance graduated from Clemson, he gave professional football a go and went to camp with the Redskins and Bears. He also played a season in NFL Europe, then played on a championship team with the Philadelphia Soul of the Arena Football League.

“They were all good experiences and part of the journey.”

Clemson Tigers Official Athletics Site

In 2009, Mance had a chance meeting with Head Coach Dabo Swinney.

“I met Coach Swinney at Gaines The huntington national bank inc funeral in Easley. He had known my dad and he asked me to work his summer camp. I had been coaching high school football.”

Swinney had been checking on Mance and heard good things. Swinney offered the former Tiger a job on his staff.

“One day during the camp, I was in the bathroom and Coach Swinney told me to come by his office.

“He started telling me about this player development job he had open and he wanted me to fill that position. I was head-over-heals excited. That is how I got started in coaching.”

Mance served in a player development role in 2010 and 2011, then was an on-field graduate assistant in 2012. He had a front-row seat for some special moments.

“I was around for turning points in the program’s history,” said Mance.

“I remember the loss to South Florida in the bowl game in Charlotte. After the game, the seniors went around the room and told the underclassmen to never let that happen again. It was very important to see those seniors take ownership of the program instead of sulking about a losing season.”

In 2013, Mance became a full-time assistant coach at North Greenville, then became a defensive backs coach for Mike Ayers’ program at Wofford.

“It was a great opportunity to work for Coach Ayers. It was like working for Bill Belichick.”

Clemson Tigers Official Athletics Site

Everything was right with the world for Mance, his wife and two-year-old son until the summer of 2016. He began to have some health issues that included headaches. They became so severe that he went to the hospital.

“I went to the emergency room and it took two weeks to diagnose. Doctors from all over the country were involved. After many tests over a long period of time, it was determined that I had a rare autoimmune disease of the nervous system.

“It was very difficult. I was basically paralyzed. It affected my lungs and I was very weak.”

Mance got some strength back in the fall, but he still had to coach virtually. He watched film and spoke with his players and fellow coaches over the phone. He could not go to the office for fear of catching a virus and was wheelchair bound.

“Coach Ayers was terrific in letting me continue to coach the cornerbacks (virtually). It was so important for me mentally to continue to stay involved with the program. It allowed me to take my mind off my physical problems.”

Clemson Tigers Official Athletics Site

Today, Mance is in remission, but he still must remain at home. He has battled through spots on his spine and lung issues, and he has had a lesion on his brain. The brain issue and the spots on his spine have cleared up.

“I had times I could barely blink because I was so weak. But I am getting stronger, doing rehab and believe I will be able to walk again. I feel like I am headed in the right direction.

“I thought Coach (Joey) Batson’s rehab was tough, but this is a different level.

“I have spoken with people who have gone through this. It is a long journey.”

One thing that keeps him going is the success of the Tigers.

“I look forward to the games every Saturday. I have become more of a fan than a former player. It is good to see those coaches I worked with be rewarded for their hard work.”

His son, now five years old, is a big Clemson fan and watches the games with his father.

“He watched the 2018 national championship game with me. He was just three at the time. After we won and were celebrating, he said to me, ‘Daddy, I’m going to play for Clemson when I turn five’.”

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Источник: https://clemsontigers.com/brians-story/

Since I couldn't ski in February or March due to a foot injury, it was a mad  scramble to get to ten 10k ski days this year, but I managed.  The 10 x 10k goal has been a brian story multi year challenge, pushing for earlier starts, farther reaches, and an expansive mindset in planning and executing outings.  I think that my watch might have been a little bit off on the Sweeney loop tour, but as a fitness replacement, I did do a mid-February 10k day on the bike, so I'm sticking to my claim of pulling off a 10 x 10k ski season.

Blackmore:  Fun day lapping the most popular Northeast shoulder with Kyle.  Great snow, and the 10k goal made for an engaging day.

Whitefish Mountain resort:  Two early laps and three afternoon laps with family lift skiing in between.

Gash North bowl:   We didn't take a turn with good snow all day, but.  Really nice to get out with Ned, get to know the North bowl of Gash proper a little better, continue to find evidence of good deep stability, and appreciate 2,500 foot long runs in early January.

Ned climbing back out of the North face of Gash proper.

Snowbowl and Point 6:  Mid day Martin Luther King day family obligations necessitated a wicked early start, but motivation was high, so I rallied from L2 around 4:30 am.  To my shock, I ended up crossing Justin Angleman and Seth Swanson's headlamps after the first lap, and we took a couple of short runs at their blistering pace.  Once the ski resort opened, I headed out to Jenny bowl, put a skin track in, and hammered out runs in perfect boot top powder.

Good skiing in Jenny bowl.

Eagle Pass:  On a forecast hot April day, I was sufficiently motivated to rally proper early to beat the forecast warm up.  The goal was to ski the big South facing avalanche path off of point 8,623 near Eagle pass.  The logistics of accessing the path and climbing out out are a bit weird, but I am pretty confident the Eagle pass approach is superior to the bushwack from Post creek.  I lucked out, catching the first run with perfect firm corn, and the second with good, slightly over ripe corn.  Really glad to finally ski this run and catch good conditions.  

OK, this is going to be fun.
Climbing out under the watchful eye of McDonald.

Note:  It appears that public access to the Eagle Pass trailhead has been cut off from the Eagle Pass road.  However, it is still possible for the public to access the trailhead from the Mollman pass road by taking the west canal road all the way South to the normal trailhead.  

Calowachan:  It seemed a little bit crazy to go for 10k with a not-crack-of-anything 1030 am start, so Brian story headed out from the Eagle pass trailhead with a plan to just see what happened.  

Panorama of the view down the Southeast face of Calowachan out to the
South Calowachan summit, Summit Lake, McDonald, etc.

To my surprise, temps were cold all day, and the skiing was delightful.  I summited the South peak four hours from leaving the car, and jumped right into an excellent run down the steep upper Southeast face and down through a long couloir directly to Summit lake.  From which it was quick to bop over to the rolling South face brian story the primary North summit.  I skied the South face from below the craggy summit block.  Another great run!  On the climb out to Eagle pass, there may have been a short throw away lap to get to 10k, but then it was on to the fast ski and slow Brian story bushwacking walk out to the car by late evening.  With cold temps and great skiing, this was a really black real estate brokers near me good day.

brian story conditions in a hidden Missions gem of a ski line.

Sweeney: After deciding that the suspect forecast for the Missions might not allow for good skiing (plan A), Jeffrey and I set out early from Missoula with plans to ski in Bass creek (plan B), but to our surprise, the trailhead was closed for prescribed burning.  So we resorted to plan C and back tracked to Sweeney.  I have wanted to do a circumnavigation tour for a while, and it seemed like the day to do it, regardless of the plan letter.

Jeffrey starting a fine long corn run on the South side of Sweeney.

We were on the summit less than three hours from leaving the car.  A bit of routefinding and icy down climbing put us on top of the Northwest gullies, which we skied on firm but edgeable ice.  Then, we climbed out of One horse creek to the top of the big Southeast bowl just past the main Sweeney summit.  The ensuing corn run was perfect - long, fun, with great snow top to bottom.  Definitely the run of the day and honestly one of the corn runs of the year.  We climbed back to the summit, then took a normal run on the Northeast face before exiting.  Nice day and fun to finally get out with Jeffrey again.

Complete Mystery tour: I had some other ski ideas, but Ned and made a compelling case to ski all of the Mystery chutes at Gash, and I'm glad he did.  The day was forecast to be warm and wet, but we headed out extra early anyway with Jeffrey with hopes that the weather would work out by luck. Sure enough, we found ourselves skiing directly off of Gash proper at 8 am with good enough weather and a reasonable re freeze. 

Gash proper from the top.

We made great time climbing to the top of the Mystery chutes, and skied the central chute first.  I put a steep but efficient (if Brian story do say so myself) track back up the chute, and we climbed all the way back to the top and picked our way into the West chute.  Ned had to ski cut heavy snow, and we had to scrap around an ice step, but it was still a fun run.  We took one last jaunt up our skin track, climbing only to the top of  the East chute.  None of us had skied the East chute, and we were delighted to find a relaxing tree lined run.  

Jeffrey in the West Mystery chute.
Ned in the mellow but excellent East Mystery chute.
We took a pretty good break in light rain before rallying up the scrappy rock lined shorter chute on the East edge of the face. Most of the climb was scrappy, but we got it done efficiently, and the skiing was also scrappy but  fun.  The climb out to Gash got a bit long.  We were way over 10k feet, it was snowing and gloppy, and I think that everyone kind of hit a low energy patch at some point.  But we persevered, and were soon making our way out to the car.  This ended up being the biggest elevation day of the year for me - something north of 12k vert I think.  
Ned climbing the last couloir of the day.

Kakashe: Keeping with the spring theme of exploring some of the lesser (i.e. not McDonald, Grey Wolf, or East Saint Mary) Mission objectives, I had a really fun day exploring the Northwest chutes on Kakashe in early May, and when another perfect weather window appeared, I was back, this time with an early enough start for a 10k day.  The goal was basically to ski around the compass on Flattop before it got too warm.  There is enough downfall that getting to and from snow line took a long time and sucked some soul, but the time spent in the alpine was delightful.  I took the short entry run, then climbed to the top of Flattop.  

Up to the summit of Flattop.

I was able to scout a safe way through the pervasive ridge line cornice and skied a good run on the East face with OK warmed powder.  Hot sun motivated a quick transition, and climb back to the summit.  Next, I skied the long Northwest couloir from the summit.  The traverse into the couloir brian story really steep and very much heads up, no-fall with variable snow and some tricky ridges to ski over. I took it one slow sidestep at a time, and was soon on top of the main couloir.  To my surprise, there was about foot of settled spring powder in the main couloir, and the skiing was outrageously good - probably the run of the season.  I skied all the way out to the base, then kept descending until I reached a point where it was possible to weave up through scrappy Mission terrain back to the summit.  Then a great run down the big open West face visible from the valley.  Then a short North couloir to get to 10k.  The a short up, short scrappy ski, long bushwack exit had me back at the car.  Another really really good ski day in new to me terrain.

Ready to ski the East face.  What a back drop!

The traverse into the Northwest couloir.  Can you tell that I was intimidated?

Great skiing in the Northwest couloir.

Warren + biking. 

Mini down climb in the middle of the North face ski run on Warren peak.

Justin and Jeffrey were game to rally extra early for the many-th annual (I'm thinking 12th or 13th) Warren Wallow.  We had time to do a little bit of extra skiing, so we started the day off by climbing to the top of the East couloir, which was super fun, then headed back up for the customary North face run from the summit.  The exit was kind of a blur, but we were back to town by early dinner time.  We bumped into another party of long time friends and enjoyed seeing them off and on during the day.  For some reason, I was really dragging on this outing, so thanks to Justin and Jeffrey for driving, setting the bootpacks, and generally taking up my slack.  In order to get to 10k, I biked a few road/gravel Marshall canyon brian story I had a pounding headache and was generally feeling terrible, but I got it done, and I'm glad I did because a dry spring followed by a very warm July resulted in an unusually early end to ski season 2021.

Источник: http://mt-adventures.blogspot.com/

Brian's story

Brian's story

Brian is 64 years old. He is cheerful and courteous. He doesn’t drink alcohol or take drugs, he never has. And he has been homeless for 11 years.

For years Brian cleaned cars at a car auction in Chelmsford. He enjoyed his job. When he was made redundant, Brian contacted his local council to claim housing benefit. He believed that his claim was in place but after several months he received a bill for over £2,000 from his landlord for rent arrears. Brian was out of work and unable to pay the debt and so, at the age of 53, Brian became homeless.

For the following 11 years Brian slept in parks and on benches. For a short period he was able find a room but as time went on, mobility issues meant he could no longer climb stairs and again he was forced onto the streets.

Brian first came to the attention of Stonepillow in September 2015 when he fell over in the street in Littlehampton. He was offered accommodation at Stonepillow Lodge, which acts as Stonepillow's hospital discharge facility and for those who, like Brian, would be unable to stay in a more traditional hostel environment due to their health needs.

Brian has flourished during his time at the Lodge, with our help he is seeking medical assistance for his mobility issues and receives support from a team of carers. He is also attending a day centre in Chichester for people of retirement age which provides him with a valuable social network.

Stonepillow continues to work with Brian to help him find long term supported accommodation where he will be able to continue to gain the help and support that he so desperately needs. With the support of Stonepillow, Brian will never again have to sleep on the streets.

Help us to help more people like Brian.Fundraise.Volunteer.Donate.

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Источник: https://stonepillow.org.uk/brians-story/

Brian Laundrie's parents' story has brian story lot of 'oddness' and things that 'didn't make sense,' police say as search for him continues

  • Brian Laundrie, the person of interest in Gabby Petito's death, has been missing since mid-September.
  • A police spokesman told NewsNation there was "a lot of oddness" in Laundrie's parents' story.
  • He said authorities were trying to figure out how Laundrie escaped while under surveillance.

Authorities searching for Brian Laundrie in Florida said there were inconsistencies and "oddness" in his parents' story.

Laundrie, 23, the sole person of interest in the death of his fiancée, Gabby Petito, has been missing since mid-September. His parents have said he went to a nature reserve in Sarasota County.

"What the family has told us is that he drove out to the park and walked out into the woods," Josh Taylor, a spokesman for the North Port Police Department, told NewsNation last week.

"I don't necessarily know what to believe anymore," Taylor added. "I think it's certainly possible that they're expressing what they know, but we'll see. I mean, this is an ongoing investigation that will continue to evolve."

The amazon honest hand sanitizer mentioned reports that Laundrie drove his Mustang to the reserve and that his parents drove it back.

"We've said from the beginning there's a lot of oddness here, a lot of things that just didn't make sense," Taylor said.

"I mean, your son walks out there — now they're saying on a Monday, you know, to report that on a Friday, and then be confused on what day that was," he added. "I mean, there are a lot of things that are odd there."

Laundrie's parents last week changed their story about which day Laundrie left, saying he'd vanished a day earlier than they'd previously told the police.

Taylor said Laundrie's father had been helping the FBI search for his son, adding that this could be a sign that his parents were trying to help investigators.

Taylor told NewsNation that authorities so far hadn't found anything related to Laundrie.

He added best high yield savings rates "no investigation is perfect" and that the police were "working to figure out" how Laundrie managed to leave undetected during the investigation.

Taylor previously told Insider that Laundrie was under surveillance when he vanished.

Petito, 22, went missing on a "van life" cross-country road trip with Laundrie. The couple set out on July 2, and Laundrie returned home to Florida on Brian story 1 without Petito.

Petito's family reported her missing on September 11. She was found dead on September 19 at a remote campsite in Wyoming.

Источник: https://www.insider.com/gabby-petito-brian-laundies-parents-story-has-lot-of-oddness-2021-10

Andy Cohen: Brian Flores An Inspiring Story www prudential com online retirement com

Fifteen years later, his resume includes just about every aspect of a pro football operation. He started in the Patriots' scouting department where he first met future Dolphins' General Manager Chris Grier. He moved on to coach offense, special teams and most recently defense, all with the Patriots. Now at just 37 years old he brings with him a wealth of big-time experience.

Ready? Sure looks like he is.

Every NFL coach comes with a story. Some are more riveting than others. But you'll have to search hard to find another coach whose story mirrors Flores, who had so little for so long and who never stopped believing that there was more to his future then food stamps and public housing projects.

The son of hard-working Honduran immigrants, and the second oldest of five children, there was no easy street for Flores and that, in part, is what made Monday's announcement so special. There are kids in Brownsville today who are hearing about Brian Flores, who can embrace his story with the reality that it too can happen to them.

That's the motto that Flores lived by growing in Brownsville. Stay strong. Stay focused. Don't give into temptation. Don't run away from any challenge. Attack each day with purpose and conviction. This is the man the Dolphins are getting, a leader out of both necessity and desire.

Источник: https://www.miamidolphins.com/news/andy-cohen-brian-flores-an-inspiring-story
brian story

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