what is my credit card number

A credit card number is often the 15- or 16-digit number found on the front or back of your credit card. It identifies several things, like the. Third-Party Services (Other than PWD): You must notify the company that manages your payment withdrawal when you have a credit card or banking account. Here we provide test card numbers for the following credit and debit cards: American Express; Bancontact; Cartes Bancaires; China UnionPay; Dankort; Diners.

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What is my credit card number -

Some banks or credit unions use blocking — putting a hold on a portion of your available credit on your credit card. That means you have less to use until the block clears. If they block your debit card, your account balance may get low, you may bounce a check, or a recurring payment you authorized may be declined.

Why was my credit or debit card declined?

Your card may be declined for a number of reasons: the card has expired; you are over your credit limit; the card issuer sees suspicious activity that could be a sign of fraud; or a hotel, rental car company,or other business placed a block (or hold) on your card for the estimated total of your bill.

What should I do if my card is declined?

First, check that you entered your information accurately. If there’s still a problem, contact the customer service number for the bank or credit union that gave you the card. They may be able to tell you what the issue is and how to fix it. Try to have another form of payment available in case it takes time to resolve any issues with your card.

Can I reduce the chances that my card will be declined?

Keeping track of your account can help. For instance, your bank or credit union will send you a replacement card before the card expires. Always activate it soon after you get it. If the card is getting close to the expiration date, and you haven’t gotten your replacement, call your bank or credit union to track it down.

Monitor your accounts regularly to keep track of spending, your account balance, or how close you are to your card’s credit limit — the maximum amount of credit you’re approved for. If the balance on your debit card is too low, or you get close to or go over your credit card’s credit limit, your card may be declined.

Some banks or credit unions offer alerts to flag fraud on your account. Sign up for these alerts so you know if there’s a problem before your card is declined. Large purchases, charges from sellers in foreign countries, or activity that seems unusual may trigger the bank or credit union to lock down your account to avoid fraud. Before traveling, contact your bank or credit union to let them know you’ll be out of town. Do the same if you’re going to use your card for a large or unusual purchase. Even if you do these things, it’s possible your card could be declined because of a block or hold on it. You may want to carry an extra card as a back-up in case the first card is declined.

What can I do to avoid blocking?

Merchants use blocks to make sure you have enough money to pay your bill. This reduces the amount of credit or cash available in your account. If you’re near your credit limit or you have a low balance in your bank account when a block is placed, your card could be declined if you want to use it for something else before the block is lifted. You can take some steps to reduce the inconvenience.

1. Ask about blocking. When you check into a hotel or rent a car, or if a restaurant or other business asks for your card ahead of time, ask:

  • Are you putting a block on my card?
  • What’s the amount of the block?
  • How did you choose that amount?
  • How long does the block last?

2. Reduce the time your card is blocked. If you pay a “blocked” bill with the same card you used to make the reservation or book the service, it can help. (Think hotels and rental cars, for example.) Paying your bill with that same card means your final charge will most likely replace the block in a day or two. But if you pay that bill with a different card — or with cash or a check — the block may last up to 15 days. That’s because the card issuer doesn’t know you paid another way.

To know where you stand, take these steps:

  • When you pay your final bill or check out, ask when the prior block will be removed.
  • If you pay with a different card, cash, or check, remind the person at the front desk that you're using a different form of payment. Ask to have the prior block removed promptly.

3. Talk to your bank or credit union. Whether you already have a credit or debit card, or you’re considering getting one, it’s worth asking the bank or credit union:

  • Do you let businesses place blocks?
  • How long do blocks last?
  • What types of businesses do you let place blocks? If you’re thinking about getting a credit or debit card, shop around. Shorter blocks may be a factor when you compare offers.

For debit cards, you may consider getting an overdraft line of credit from your bank or credit union. This is a kind of loan attached to your checking account. If your account balance gets low, the overdraft line of credit will help you avoid bouncing checks or having your debit card declined.

Ask:

  • Do you offer a plan that automatically covers the overdraft?
  • How does the plan work?
  • How much does the plan cost? If you choose a plan that automatically covers the overdraft, you might end up paying a fee if you don't pay off the amount quickly, and interest on the loan until you repay it. To learn more about overdraft fees and protection, read the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s Consumer Advisory about overdrafts, or visit HelpWithMyBank.gov, a site maintained by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency.
Источник: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/when-company-declines-your-credit-or-debit-card

How to Identify a Credit Card by the Account Number

When accepting credit card numbers over the phone from customers, you can easily identify the type of card without asking the customer. While each credit card has a unique string of numbers, in varying lengths, the first one or two digits will reveal the issuer of the card. You can also note other characteristics of the number to help you confirm the evidence.

Identifying by the First Digit

Simply noting the first digit of the credit card account number can help you narrow down or identify the issuer. Credit cards, such as MasterCard, Visa, and Discover, all have unique, identifying numbers as their first digits, with the exception of American Express, Diner's Club and Carte Blanche, which share the same first digit: the number 3. MasterCard's unique first digit is 5, while Visa's is always 4. A Discover card's first digit is consistently the number 6.

Identifying by Two or More Digits

You can further identify credit cards that start with the same first number by analyzing two or more digits. For example, even though American Express, Diner's Club and Carte Blanche all start with the number 3, you can confirm American Express numbers if the first digit, 3, is followed by a 4 or a 7. However, if a zero, 6 or 8 follow the 3, the credit card number belongs to a Diner's Club or Carte Blanche account.

Valid Lengths of Account Numbers

Some of the more common issuers of cards have between 13 and 16 digits. Each type of account number has specific lengths, which can serve as a secondary method to identify the type of credit card. For example, Visa account numbers can be up to 19 digits. If you see a credit card number that starts with a 4 and contains 19 digits, you can assume it's a Visa. Mastercard and Discover account numbers contain 16 digits. American Express contains 15 digits, and Diner's Club and Carte Blanche contain 14 digits.

Categories of Issuing Entities

The first digit of every credit card serves as a major industry identifier, or MII. For example, if the first digit of a card number is a 7, the card is issued by an entity related to the petroleum industry, such as a gasoline brand. Digits 4 and 5 – Visa and MasterCard – relate to the banking and financial industry. The number 6 – Discover – represents merchandizing and banking.

Account numbers beginning with 3 – American Express, Diner's Club and Carte Blanche – tie their issuing entity to the travel and entertainment category. The numbers 1 and 2 relate to airlines or other industry assignments, while the number 8 identifies telecommunications or other industry assignments. A number 9 represents a national assignment entity.

References

Resources

Writer Bio

Based in Texas, Cynthia Measom has been writing various parenting, business and finance and education articles since 2011. Her articles have appeared on websites such as The Bump and Motley Fool. Measom received a Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of Texas at Austin.

Источник: https://smallbusiness.chron.com/identify-credit-card-account-number-61050.html

Credit Card Numbers: What Do They Mean?

Have you ever wondered what all those numbers you can never quite memorize stamped across your credit card actually mean? We use our cards daily but most of us have little understanding of the history and objectives they represent.

How to Read Your Credit Card Number

That lengthy number on the front of your card is packed with crucial information. The order of the digits isn’t random but strategically organized, following an international standard.

From that sequence, you can find out the issuing bank, your account number and more. Most importantly, the technology behind the number helps prevent fraud, minimizes payment issues and reduces errors.

How? It all goes back to when the credit card industry was struggling to get customers.

The Four Major Credit Card Networks: A Brief History

A credit card is more than a rectangular slip of plastic and metal. Everything adheres to a strict standard. Yes, even the shape and the substance of the card itself. A credit card is a powerful tool issued by a financial institution such as a bank or credit union allowing you to borrow funds.

Financial institutions use a third-party company called a credit card network to facilitate communication between the terminal of payment and the issuing bank. Electronic transfers are thus quicker. Four major credit card networks dominate global markets. You know them: Visa, Mastercard, American Express and Discover.

The first and largest network was originally called the “BankAmericard.” Established in 1958 by Bank of America in an effort to offer a credit product geared toward consumers rather than toward businesses, initially the card flopped. But by the mid-60s it had turned around, amassing major profits. By 1974 BankAmericard had expanded into international markets and in 1976 it became known as “Visa Inc.” Small banks responded to Bank of America’s trial balloon, embracing the concept.

Mastercard, known at the time as “Interbank,” appeared in 1966. By 1968 the company had gone global. In 1979, the card changed its name and became known as Mastercard. Today this is the second-largest card network in the world.

American Express’s origin story began in 1850 as a small freight forwarding company. By the 1950s, it had grown drastically and expanded into the financial sector. In 1958, American Express issued its first consumer charge card. Fun fact: These primitive cards were made from paper. American Express is currently the third-largest card network on the globe.

The smallest of the four major card networks is Discover Card. Sears first released the Discover Card in 1985 as a way to expand into the financial market. The card grew rapidly in a short period of time. It is now used by millions of merchants worldwide.

Each of these networks had one goal: to fulfil the consumer’s need to access funds immediately without having to rely on cash. Modern credit cards represent intricate and highly refined history, much of it aimed at protecting consumers against fraud.

Front of a Credit Card

On the front of your credit card, you’ll typically see:

  • the bank’s branding
  • a unique card number
  • the cardholder’s name
  • an expiration date
  • a smart chip
  • the payment network logo

The Structure of the Card Number

Although it may seem random, credit card digits are each strategically placed and represent a vital piece of information. Accurate transactions would not be possible without the specific sequence of numbers, the precise shape and exact size, all of which adhere to strict standards dictated by the ISO (International Organization of Standardization) and enforced by the ANSI (American Network of Standards Institute).

These standards allow cards to be used worldwide. The only difference among them is Visa, Mastercard and Discover are always 16 digits while American Express employs a 15-digit format.

The First 6-digits

The first 6-digits of the credit card represent the Issuer Identification Number (IIN), also known as the Bank Identification Number (BIN). These digits clearly identify the financial institution issuing the card. The first digit is the Major Industry Identifier (MII) and it is allocated by the American Banking Association. Each major credit card network has its own MII:

  • American Express cards always begin with the number 3- more specifically 34 or 37.
  • Visa cards begin with the number 4.
  • Mastercards start with the number 5.
  • Discover Cards begin with the number 6.

The next 5-digits of the IIN represent the specific issuing bank. These digits facilitate the exchange of information for the clearing of a transaction. The IIN for each of the four major networks:

  • Visa uses numbers 2 through 6 as the BIN.
  • Mastercard uses digits 2 and 3, or 2 through 4, 5, or 6.
  • American Express uses numbers 3 and 4 to identify the brand of card (e.g. American Express Platinum card, Delta Card, etc.).

The Account Number

Following the first 6 IIN figures is the account number. This sequence can reach up to 12-digits but is normally 6. Issuing banks assign this number to their individual customers. Each issuing bank has about a trillion potential account numbers.

The Check Digit

Credit card issuers and networks use mathematical tools to combat data breaches and other fraudulent activity. The Luhn Algorithm or Modulus 10 is one such device. Developed in the 1960s, it uses identification digits such as social security and credit card numbers to determine validity.

Credit cards are meant to be used instantly for payments. That’s why the validation process used by banks must encrypt and decrypt sensitive data immediately. Here’s where The Luhn algorithm comes in. With it, card numbers can be easily verified and their validity confirmed.

The Luhn algorithm is simple to use. When adding the check number to the rest of the numbers on the card, the sum should equal 0. If you enter the wrong number during an online purchase, it will be detected right away, as the sum won’t be 0.

Visa uses digit 13 as the checksum in most cases, while all other major networks use the last digit.

Back of a Credit Card

Now that we understand what’s on the front of a credit card, it’s time to look on the back. Here you’ll typically find:

  • A security code (CVV)
  • A magnetic stripe
  • A hologram
  • The bank contact detail and customer service phone line
  • A signature box
  • The card network logo

Some credit cards also carry the expiration date on the back.

Other Card Numbers: The CVV and the Expiration Date

The Card Verification Value (CVV) is a series of three or four digits usually found on the back of the credit card. It represents another validation process and thus adds a level of protection. Some credit card issuers call it the Card Verification Code (CVC). Its purpose is the same regardless of its name.

By asking for this small but significant additional piece of information, a Point-Of-Sale system (POS) provides more assurance the account owner has possession of the card —and that the number hasn’t been stolen.

An expiration date is assigned to the card by the issuing bank and can also help with security by requiring yet another verification step. A card number may have been stolen, but without the expiration date, that number becomes nearly worthless.

Chip Card Technology and Magnetic Stripes

All these numbers—the PAN, CVV/CVC and expiration date—are stored in the magnetic stripe and in the Europay, Mastercard and Visa chip (EMV).

Also known as the magstripe, the magnetic stripe is located on the back of the card and transmits the card’s data to the POS. The data transmitted is static. In other words, the information is loaded into the stripe and remains unchanged.

Although cards still contain a magstripe most of them now also use EMV or chip card technology. This microprocessor is placed on the front of the card where it also transmits data to the POS. Unlike the static magnetic stripe, the EMV uses a dynamic means of transmission.

How does it all work? Each time you use the card, the transaction generates a different one-time code. This process makes the EMV technology much safer from card fraud such as skimming and counterfeiting.

And you guessed it, everything about the magstripe and EMV chips is standardized by the ISO.

Credit Card Numbers Versus Account Numbers

Many people believe the number on the credit card is the same as their account number. This is false. But the two are linked and your account number will usually be on your credit card statement.

If you need to replace your credit card, whether it was stolen, lost or damaged, you’ll receive a new card number, but your account number will remain the same.

Customer Service Phone Line

Customer service phone numbers are not needed in making purchases and have no role in keeping your card safe from fraud per se. But it remains the best way to get in touch with someone from your bank when you need it.

For instance, many fraud attempts are carried out via phone or email. The quickest way to check whether a call or a message is legit is to call the number on the back of your card. You’ll be talking to someone from your bank who’ll be able to tell if there were any messages sent to you.

Write down this number and keep it separate from your card so that if you lose your card you can quickly call to immediately block the card so that nobody else can use it.

Signature Box

You need to sign your card before you can use it. Usually, the issuer will verify you sign it when you receive it. But even if they don’t, remember to do so or merchants will have the right to deny the card.

Hologram Security Feature

Holograms are difficult to fake, which is why they can be a great security feature. This small mirror-like patch shows a three-dimensional image. If you look closely, you’ll notice the image moves when you change the viewing angle.
How to Protect Your Credit Card Number
The sad truth is that credit card numbers get stolen all the time. The best thing you can do to avoid this is to use caution each time you’re making a purchase.

When shopping online, pay close attention to the platform. If possible, use services like PayPal that keep your credit card number safe. Otherwise, check the company, make sure the website is secure and uses an SSL certificate.

Also, keep an eye out for phishing emails. If anything looks suspicious, don’t click any links and don’t download any attachments. Verify the sender or call your bank.
Finally, don’t forget to make sure your computer is protected against malware and spyware.

Bottom Line

The introduction of the credit card network and years of perfecting transaction methods have led to the credit card features we use today. Your credit card is packed with important information and although the process behind it may be complicated, it helps simplify your life and the way in which you make payments.

Find The Best Credit Cards For 2021

No single credit card is the best option for every family, every purchase or every budget. We've picked the best credit cards in a way designed to be the most helpful to the widest variety of readers.

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FAQs

What is a credit card number?

A credit card number is a long set of digits usually displayed on the front of the credit card. Its goal is to identify both the credit card issuer and the account holder. It also helps prevent fraud.

How long are credit card numbers?

Credit card numbers are usually made of 16 digits arranged in sets of four. American Express numbers contain 15 digits. Though rare, some credit card companies employ 19 digits.

How do people steal credit card numbers?

Phishing emails and calls are still one of the most common methods of theft. Spyware and malware are also increasingly common. But don’t forget about the good old-fashioned ways: mail and trash. If you throw your paper statements in the trash, make sure your card number can’t be read.

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Источник: https://www.forbes.com/advisor/credit-cards/what-does-your-credit-card-number-mean/

Bank Identification Number Search

“Bank Identification Number,” or BIN code, refers to the initial sequence of four to six numbers that appears on a credit card. The number is used to identify the card’s issuing bank or other financial institution.

The BIN number ties an issuer to all the cards it issues, and to all the transactions on those cards. At the top of this page, you can use our BIN number lookup tool and use the credit card identifier system to determine the issuing bank of (almost) any payment card.

In the rest of this post, we’ll take a closer look at these bank id numbers, what they mean, and how they may change in the future.

What Is a Bank Identification Number?

First, lets answer: what is a BIN? Like most industries, the payments sector is littered with its own slate of undecipherable acronyms and confusing argot. The BIN is a perfect example. What is it? How does it differ from an IIN? And what do all those numbers mean, anyway?

The BIN (or bank identification code) is a numbering convention developed to identify which particular institution issued a given credit card or other bank card, and what type of institution it is. It’s essentially the bank’s calling card; each card-issuing bank has a unique BIN.

To start, let’s look at the full set of numbers on the front of a typical bank card. This numbering system applies to credit/charge cards, debit cards, prepaid cards, and certain electronic benefit cards. For the purposes of this article, we lump them all together under the blanket term “payment card.”

Bank Identification Numbers

In this illustration, the first six digits are traditionally called the Bank Identification Number. It’s becoming more common, however, to use the term Issuer Identification Number, or IIN. This reflects an increasing number of non-bank institutions who opt into the BIN network. However, the terms IIN and BIN can be used more or less interchangeably.

Don't forget to try the bin checker tool at the top of the page to test for yourself. 

In either case, the number can vary between four and six digits, depending on the specific institution that issued the card. While using the first six numbers is the most common, it isn’t mandatory, and even that may change soon, as we’ll discuss later.

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The Major Industry Identifier

The first digit of the card number is the Major Industry Identifier, or MII, and it possesses a certain significance on its own. The MII identifies the category or type of institution which issued the card. Visa- and MasterCard-branded cards, for example, are primarily issued by banks, and so they are classified as financial payment cards. Diner’s Club and American Express are considered travel and entertainment cards, as this was their primary function at the time they debuted.

This chart spells out the MII codes by category:

MII Digit ValueIssuer Category
0ISO/TC 68 Assignment
1Airline cards
2Airlines cards (and other future industry assignments)
3Travel and Entertainment Cards
4Banking and Financial Cards
5Banking and Financial Cards
6Merchandising and Financial Cards
7Gas Cards, Other Future Industry Assignments
8Healthcare Cards, Telecommunications, Other Future Industry Assignments
9For Use by National Standards Bodies

To recap, when looking at the full bank card number, the first digit identifies the card issuer’s industry, while the first six digits collectively identify the specific institution which issued the card. The remainder of the 16 (or 15, in some cases) digits make up the cardholder’s account number, including one or more check digits, also called a “checksum.” A checksum represents the sum of a formula that helps determine if the credit card number is actually valid.

With the numbering combinations available, it is possible for each issuer to have about a trillion different account numbers for their cardholders.

How Bank Identification Numbers Help

The BIN/IIN provides merchants with a lot of other information besides just the issuing entity. For example, when cardholders enter card details for an online transaction, just those first few digits tell the retailer:

  • The name, address, and phone number of the bank funds will be transferred from
  • The card brand (Visa, Mastercard, American Express, etc.)
  • What type of card it is (debit, credit, prepaid, etc.)
  • What level the card is (black, platinum, business)
  • Whether the issuer is in the same country as the device used in the transaction
  • Whether the address provided by the cardholder matches the one on file

Finally, the BIN/IIN allows merchants to accept multiple forms of payment and speed up the overall processing.

Here are a few examples of the BIN format for the most widely-used card brands in the US:

Visa: 4*****

American Express (AMEX): 34**** or 37****

Diner’s Club: 36****

MasterCard: 51**** or 55****

Discover Card: 6011, 622126-622925, 644-649, 65

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Bank Identification NumbersBank Identification Numbers

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Your Future Bank Identification Number

As the world shifts more and more toward a digital-reality, the role of the bank identification number will likely expand. By default, this means more unique BINs will be needed. The term “BIN” itself will most likely give way to IIN eventually, as new industries enter what has traditionally been banks’ operating environment.

While there’s no shortage of account numbers right now, industry insiders think long-term. In 2016, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) announced changes to the BIN/IIN, including expanding it from six digits to the first 8. Additionally, Mastercard introduced “account ranges” to use a single BIN across multiple products, and expanded into the little-used 2-series BIN cards. As of now, issuers and their processors are not required to move to 8-digit BIN, but they may adopt an 8-digit BIN standard if they choose.

How to Make BINs Work for You

There are additional ways that BIN, IIN and MII numbers can be used to help merchants analyze and assess their payment card transactions. More–and more accurate–information can lead to more efficient operations, but the analysis process can be quite involved. That’s why it helps to have professionals in your corner.

If you’d like more information on how to use the bank identification number to your advantage, contact Chargebacks911® today. Our payment experts have the experience and expertise to help you explore different reporting and revenue optimization techniques.


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Recover Revenue.

Источник: https://chargebacks911.com/bank-identification-numbers/

When I went to use my credit card the store told me the charge was not "authorized". What does that mean? What can I do?

If a charge is not authorized, it usually means that there is a problem with the account or that you are at, near, or over your credit limit.

Usually, when you use your credit card at a store the merchant obtains authorization from the card issuer. This authorization tells the merchant that your account is valid and that sufficient credit is available to cover the purchase.

However, sometimes the merchant is unable to connect with your card issuer because of a technological glitch. You should call the card issuer to find out the reason the charge was not authorized.

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Источник: https://www.consumerfinance.gov/ask-cfpb/when-i-went-to-use-my-credit-card-the-store-told-me-the-charge-was-not-147authorized148-what-does-that-mean-what-can-i-do-en-32/

How do people steal credit card numbers?

Scanning your credit card statement and spotting charges you know you never made is stressful and can be disorienting, especially if the card in question is still "safely" in your wallet.

The reality is that thieves don't need your physical card to use your account. 

Key takeaways

  • You can amazon fresh careers your credit card info from thieves with some simple steps
  • Data breaches, keyloggers and skimmers can compromise your credit card while it's still in your wallet
  • Learn the steps to take should your credit card info be compromised

How do people steal credit card numbers?

Unfortunately, there seems to be no limit to how thieves get their grubby hands on somebody else's credit card numbers, but here are a few key ways to understand what sometimes occurs:

Data breaches. According to the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse, more than 10 billion records have been stolen from approximately 9,000 and counting data breaches since 2005 (that includes not just credit card numbers but passwords and passports). If you see a news headline about a data breach, it just means a hacker has accessed a corporation's database and stolen information, credit card numbers or something else, from it.

PhishingThat's when a crook emails you and tricks you into giving up your credit card or other personal information. For instance, the thief may try to convince you to click a button or link that takes you to a fake store with the hopes that you'll enter your credit card information to make a purchase.

Malware. This is a virus designed to exploit your device or programs. Depending on the virus, you could be typing in your credit card information to a store website or something similar, and that hacker somewhere in the world now has your credit card number, the expiration date, and, ah, yes, the three-digit security code.

Keylogging. Criminals will sometimes install software on your computer - either by sneaking into your office, or sending it via spyware (a type of malware that spies on your computer). Keylogging software allows a crook to see everything you type. That includes passwords and credit card numbers– as well as all of the webpages you visit, whether a silly pop culture blog or some X-rated site you'd never want people knowing you go to, or your bank website. Phishing emails are an incredibly common way for keylogging software to end up on is grated parmesan cheese bad for you device.

Credit card skimmers. Credit card skimmers are a device that thieves put on a credit card and debit card payment terminal, often a gas station pumps or ATM. You run your card through to pay for your gas, and the skimmer stores your credit card information for the thief.

Simply seizing an opportunity. Restaurant workers have stolen credit card numbers when they have a card in their possession (it probably doesn't happen often, but you'll see stories about it in the news sometimes). You're at risk if you leave your credit cards in your hotel room, and if somebody who works there comes in (again, it probably doesn't happen often, but it can happen). In both cases, your card is technically still in your possession, but the damage is done.

And, of course, there are just old-fashioned opportunistic pickpockets who can swipe your wallet or steal a credit card that's in an envelope in your mailbox or steal a credit card financial statement from your garbage and the list goes on (thieves are, unfortunately, creative). Given that it isn't hard to find out a person's address these days, the numbers from your credit card are likely enough to make it possible for a thief to use your card account.

So keep those credit cards as close to you as possible.

How do thieves use stolen card numbers?

Most often, with stolen credit cards people buy merchandise for themselves and to sell, often electronics and luxury items. If someone has stolen your physical card, they often sprint to a brick-and-mortar store and buy a bunch of stuff quickly - and then toss the card before they're caught or as soon as they max out the limit.

Usually, crooks aren't stupid enough to do online shopping and send products to their house with a stolen credit card, but that doesn't mean they can't shop online and send the items elsewhere. Remember, too, that entering billing information isn't hard to do these days when most people's addresses and contact info are so readily available online.

Some criminals will handle the theft of your credit card number like a business - and sell it (and the hundreds or thousands of other credit card numbers that they have found) to other crooks.

Also keep in mind that your debit card isn't safe either if somebody makes off with your wallet. You may think to yourself, "Well, nobody knows my PIN," but at many retail establishments, you can often still run your debit card as "credit," which can make your PIN useless.

What to do if your card details are stolen?

It's going to be a hassle to deal with a stolen credit card, but you can quick steps to ease the burden: 

  1. Call the police (in some cases). If it's a situation where you were robbed or your wallet was taken, the police should be your first call. If it's that you were hacked and this was a completely non-violent theft, it's better go to step two first. Customer service can advise you on whether you should call the police.
  2. Call your credit card issuers immediately. Chances are, they already know or have called you (credit card companies are pretty good at knowing, for instance, that you live where you live and that when somebody starts using your card 4,000 miles away, it probably isn't you). Tell the customer rep what has happened, and they'll put a stop to any more spending on your card or cards - and they'll send you replacements with new numbers.
  3. Consider putting a freeze on your credit. It's a drag to have to do this, but you could freeze your credit report, which should keep random strangers from getting access to your file. That's important because now a crook can't use your good name to get a loan - because the lender won't be able to check your credit report to approve the loan. If you, down the road, want to apply for a credit card or a car loan or whatever, you'll need to lift the credit freeze - and reestablish it, if you think you're better off with your credit report frozen. To freeze your credit report alert each of the three main credit reporting firms: Equifax, Experian and TransUnion. 

How can you prevent this from happening to you?

There are several strategies you may want to try to prevent your credit cards from being stolen. In no particular order, here we go:

Keep your wallet in a smart spot. If you typically keep your wallet in your back pocket, in a big city, put it in your front pocket, making it difficult for pickpockets to remove your wallet. If you carry a purse, have it so that the strap is diagonally across your chest (it's much harder for a thief to grab it and run), or you could use a short-strapped purse, if you tuck it under your arm. And don't leave your purse anywhere, where somebody could rifle through it when you aren't looking, like in a grocery cart.

Keep your computer and devices protected. Hopefully we've all gotten the memo by now, this deep into the 21st century, but make sure your computer has formidable anti-virus protection.

Live your best digital life. To prevent your credit cards from being stolen by the rare rotten apple working at a restaurant or hotel, or from a pickpocket thief, you may want to leave your credit cards securely at home - and put the credit cards on your phone and pay that way. Just make sure your phone isn't stolen (or that it's properly locked).

Keep an eye on your card during in-person transactions. This can be tough. You hand your card over to a fast food employee or a waiter, and for maybe a minute or so, your card is out of your sight. (Don't give the employee any grief; they're probably underpaid and overworked as it is.) But in general, you want to try to keep an eye on your card when you hand it to somebody.

Check your credit card statements regularly. Check your credit card and bank websites regularly (every day is a good idea). The last thing you need is to not know that your credit card, or debit card, has been stolen, and for days or weeks to pass, with you blissfully unaware as to what's happened.

Staying informed is important, particularly when it comes to debit cards. Laws do a decent job of protecting credit cardholders from being on the hook for fraudulent purchases, but debit cardholders don't have the same protections. If your debit card is stolen, you could be out all that money depending on how quickly your report the theft.

Only use secure websites. Look for websites in which the URL starts with https:, instead of http:. If a website goes with "http:," that doesn't mean it's a crooked website at all - the person running the website may be as honest as the day is ally bank auto loan insurance address – but it does mean that there are no safeguards to protect your information… and so you are more at risk for getting hacked.

Don't give your account number over the phone. It's a good practice to get into. Obviously, there may be times when you feel like you have to give out your credit card number. You're past due on a bill with your doctor's office, and they ask for your credit card account number, and you know you're talking to your physician's office - you were the one who called them - and you don't feel like putting off making the payment any longer. So you give out the number.

In other words, use your common sense and best judgment, but at the same time, there's no harm in being paranoid about giving out your credit card number. If you can avoid giving out your credit card account number over the phone, you're increasing your odds that you won't have your financial information compromised.

Remove credit card information from e-commerce sites. Yeah, your favorite stores ask if they can store your credit card information to save you time later from typing city national bank of florida cd rates the information, what is my credit card number it does mean you're increasing your odds of being hacked. Generally, yes, having your credit card info stored a trusted reputable brand's website isn't going to lead to anything nefarious at all.

That said, no website is 100% hack-proof. And if you do have your information stolen, your dealing with the financial and paperwork headaches to come will be a much bigger time waste than retyping a credit card number, date and security code into a store's website.

What are card companies doing to combat fraud?

A lot. If somebody spends money using your credit card, you aren't out much and probably nothing - the credit card company, however, is. So they have a lot of incentive to make sure that your credit cards aren't stolen. You need to try and do your part, of course, like having anti-virus protection on your computer and not leaving your wallet in your unlocked car where debit visa gift card pin thief might pass by.

All of the major credit card issuers, however, have been partnering with technological companies and employing artificial intelligence to come up with algorithms designed to detect credit card fraud.

Credit card companies are always working on new ways to prevent theft. The security code on the back of your card is one safeguard, and a popular method among some credit cards is to allow cardholders to use a lock feature that essentially turns off their credit card, so it can't be used, unless the cardholder wants to turn it on and use it.

Many credit cards issuers also monitor the "dark web," the part of the internet that isn't indexed by search engines, like Google and Bing. That's where crooks often sell stolen credit card numbers.

So you might understandably be concerned about credit card theft, but it's the credit card executives and their tech teams who are likely losing sleep over this as laws are pretty explicit that the bank, not the cardholder, is on the hook for the lost funds in most cases.

Can someone steal my credit card number wirelessly?

Yes, but it's unlikely. That isn't to say that it won't happen, just that it doesn't very often. Thieves who have scanners may be able to pick up the faint radio signals that are in RFID chips that some credit cards have, if they manage to get about an arm's length away from you. It reportedly happened, for instance, to a shopper in Holly Springs, North Carolina, last year, where thieves apparently had a credit card reader or scanner and managed to get a hold of a woman's credit card information while she was in a Walmart. She received an alert from her credit issuer that somebody had made purchases with her card - while she was still in the store.

Not that it'll make you feel any better, but your odds are probably far higher of having your credit card stolen in some way, like a database being hacked, or you accidentally getting malware on your computer and having thieves steal your credit card and other personal financial information that way.

How to check if your credit card information has been stolen

There's actually no sure-fire way to know if your credit card information has been stolen, unless somebody actually tries to use it, and you have proof that it was taken. Or perhaps if a business shares with you that their database was hacked, and that your personal information was taken. However, there are strategies to try that can uncover whether somebody has taken your credit card number.

First, as a quick reminder, don't go to any website that asks you to give out your credit card information and its expiration date, so you can determine if it was stolen. There are such types of websites out there that you might easily stumble upon if you go looking online for articles about stolen credit cards. Please don't use them. That's a good way to get your credit card number stolen.

Secondly, you can and should contact the three major U.S. credit bureaus (Equifax, TransUnion and Experian) and look at your credit reports every so often. During typical times, you can get one free credit report a year by going to AnnualCreditReport.com and requesting a report, so generally, what is my credit card number advised that every four months, you ask for a report, and then three times a year, you're getting a new report. Learn more about why this is important.

Since the pandemic began, people have been allowed to get free weekly access to those credit reports - and they'll be able to until April 20, 2022, unless, of course, the deadline is extended.

Meanwhile, many banks and credit cards offer free credit scores, and checking those out, too, sometimes may lead a consumer to realize that their personal identification may have been dpss los angeles near me - if, say, their credit score has mysteriously plunged from 740 to 590.

Am I responsible for fraudulent credit card purchases?

A little, but odds are, you won't pay a dime, even if a thief spends thousands of dollars with your credit card. The Fair Credit Billing Act limits your liability for unauthorized use of your credit card to $50 - but the four major credit card networks (Visa, Mastercard, Discover and American Express) offer $0 liability if you have your credit cards stolen.

That's one argument for using credit cards over debit cards. If you miss the fact that your debit card was stolen and don't report it stolen for two or more business days, you could be liable up to $500. If somehow two months goes by, and then you realize you had money stolen from you via your debit card, you may be liable for all of your losses.

So the odds are pretty good that you will not be paying anything if your credit cards are stolen. That said, you do want to act fast if they are. You don't want shady people doing who knows what with your credit card - and if they have other personal information of yours, like your Social Security number, your problems are just starting, and stolen credit cards are, in a way, the least of your problems.

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Источник: https://www.cardratings.com/my-credit-card-was-stolen-but-its-still-in-my-wallet.html

Credit Card Numbers: What Do They Mean?

Have you ever wondered what all those numbers you can never quite memorize stamped across your credit card actually mean? We use our cards daily but most of us have little understanding of the history and objectives they represent.

How to Read Your Credit Card Number

That lengthy number on the front of your card is packed with crucial information. The order of the digits isn’t random but strategically organized, following an international standard.

From that sequence, you can find out the issuing bank, your account number and more. Most importantly, the technology behind the number helps prevent fraud, minimizes payment issues and reduces errors.

How? It all goes back to when the credit card industry was struggling to get customers.

The Four Major Credit Card Networks: A Brief History

A credit card is more than a rectangular slip of plastic and metal. Everything adheres to a strict standard. Yes, even the shape and the substance of the card itself. A credit card is a powerful tool issued by a financial institution such as a bank or credit union allowing you to borrow funds.

Financial institutions use a third-party company called a credit card network to facilitate communication between the terminal of payment and the issuing bank. Electronic transfers are thus quicker. Four major credit card networks dominate global markets. You know them: Visa, Mastercard, American Express and Discover.

The first and largest network was originally called the “BankAmericard.” Established in 1958 by Bank of America in an effort to offer a credit product geared toward consumers rather than toward businesses, initially the card flopped. But by the mid-60s it had turned around, amassing major profits. By 1974 BankAmericard had expanded into international markets and in 1976 it became known as “Visa Inc.” Small banks responded to Bank of America’s trial balloon, embracing the concept.

Mastercard, known at the time as “Interbank,” appeared in 1966. By 1968 the company had gone global. In 1979, the card changed its name and became known as Mastercard. Today this is the second-largest card network in the world.

American Express’s origin story began in 1850 as a small freight forwarding company. By the 1950s, it had grown drastically and expanded into the financial sector. In 1958, American Express issued its first consumer charge card. Fun fact: These primitive cards were made from paper. American Express is currently the third-largest card network on the globe.

The smallest of the four major card networks is Discover Card. Sears first released the Discover Card in 1985 as a way to expand into the financial market. The card grew rapidly in a short period of time. It is now used by millions of merchants worldwide.

Each of these networks had one goal: to fulfil the consumer’s need to access funds immediately without having to rely on cash. Modern credit cards represent intricate and highly refined history, much of it aimed at protecting consumers against fraud.

Front of a Credit Card

On the front of your credit card, you’ll typically see:

  • the bank’s branding
  • a unique card number
  • the cardholder’s name
  • an expiration date
  • a smart chip
  • the payment network logo

The Structure of the Card Number

Although it may seem random, credit card digits are each strategically placed and represent a vital piece of information. Accurate transactions would not be possible without the specific sequence of numbers, the precise shape and exact size, all of which adhere to strict standards dictated by the ISO (International Organization of Standardization) and enforced by the ANSI (American Network of Standards Institute).

These standards allow cards to be used worldwide. The only difference among them is Visa, Mastercard and Discover are always 16 digits while American Express employs chase bank student loan rates 15-digit format.

The First 6-digits

The first 6-digits of the credit card represent the Issuer Identification Number (IIN), also known as the Bank Identification Number (BIN). These digits clearly identify the financial institution issuing the card. The first digit is the Major Industry Identifier (MII) and it is allocated by the American Banking Association. Each major credit card network has its own MII:

  • American Express cards always begin with the number 3- more specifically 34 or 37.
  • Visa cards begin with what is my credit card number number 4.
  • Mastercards start with the number 5.
  • Discover Cards begin with the number 6.

The next 5-digits of the IIN represent the specific issuing bank. These digits facilitate the exchange of information for the clearing of a transaction. The IIN for each of the four major networks:

  • Visa uses numbers 2 through 6 as the BIN.
  • Mastercard uses digits 2 and 3, or 2 through 4, 5, or 6.
  • American Express uses numbers 3 and 4 to identify the brand of card (e.g. American Express Platinum card, Delta Card, etc.).

The Account Number

Following the first 6 IIN figures is the account online only bank account uk. This sequence can reach up to 12-digits but is normally 6. Issuing banks assign this number to their individual customers. Each issuing bank has about a trillion potential account numbers.

The Check Digit

Credit card issuers and networks use mathematical tools to combat data breaches and other fraudulent activity. The Luhn Algorithm or Modulus 10 is one such device. Developed in the 1960s, it uses identification digits such as social security and credit card numbers to determine validity.

Credit cards are meant to be used instantly for payments. That’s why the validation process used by banks must encrypt and decrypt sensitive data immediately. Here’s where Black keys the greek Luhn algorithm comes in. With it, card numbers can be easily verified and their validity confirmed.

The Luhn algorithm is simple to use. When adding the check number to the rest of the numbers on the card, the sum should equal 0. If you enter the wrong number during an online purchase, it will be detected right away, as the sum won’t be 0.

Visa uses digit 13 as the checksum in american express credit card sign in cases, while all other major networks use the last digit.

Back of a Credit Card

Now that we understand what’s on the front of a credit card, it’s time to look on the back. Here you’ll typically find:

  • A security code (CVV)
  • A magnetic stripe
  • A hologram
  • The bank contact detail and customer service phone line
  • A signature box
  • The card network logo

Some credit cards also carry the expiration date on the back.

Other Card Numbers: The CVV and the Expiration Date

The Card Verification Value (CVV) is a series of three or four digits usually found on the back of the credit card. It represents another validation process and thus adds a level of protection. Some credit card issuers call it the Card Verification Code (CVC). Its purpose is the same regardless of its name.

By asking for this small but significant additional piece of information, a Point-Of-Sale system (POS) provides more assurance the account owner has possession of the card —and that the number hasn’t been stolen.

An expiration date is assigned to the card by the issuing bank and can also help with security by requiring yet another verification step. A card number may have been stolen, but without the expiration date, that number becomes nearly worthless.

Chip Card Technology and Magnetic Stripes

All these numbers—the PAN, CVV/CVC and expiration date—are stored in the magnetic stripe and in the Europay, Mastercard and Visa chip (EMV).

Also known as the magstripe, the magnetic stripe is located on the back of the card and citibank government travel card online statement the card’s data to the POS. The data transmitted is static. In other words, the information is loaded into the stripe and remains unchanged.

Although cards still contain a magstripe most of them now also use EMV or chip card technology. This microprocessor is placed on the front of the card where it also transmits data to the POS. Unlike the static magnetic stripe, the EMV uses a dynamic means of transmission.

How does it all work? Each time you use the card, the transaction generates a different one-time code. This process makes the EMV technology much safer from card fraud such as skimming and counterfeiting.

And you guessed it, everything about the magstripe and EMV chips is standardized by the ISO.

Credit Card Numbers Versus Account Numbers

Many people believe the number on the credit card is the same as their account number. This is false. But the two are linked and your account number will usually be on your credit card statement.

If you need to replace your credit card, whether it was stolen, lost or damaged, you’ll receive a new card number, but your account number will remain the same.

Customer Service Phone Line

Customer service phone numbers are not needed in making purchases and have no role in keeping your card safe from fraud per se. But it remains the best way to get in touch with someone from your bank when you need it.

For instance, many fraud attempts are carried out via phone or email. The quickest way to check whether a call or a message is legit is to call the number on the back of your card. You’ll be talking to someone from your bank who’ll be able to tell if there were any messages sent to you.

Write down this number and keep it separate from your card so that if you lose your card you can quickly call to immediately block the card so that nobody else can use it.

Signature Box

You need to sign your card before you can use it. Usually, the issuer will verify you sign it when you receive it. But even if they don’t, remember to do so or merchants will have the right to deny the card.

Hologram Security Feature

Holograms are difficult to fake, which is why they can be a great security feature. This small mirror-like patch shows a three-dimensional image. If you look closely, you’ll notice the image moves when you change the viewing angle.
How to Protect Your Credit Card Number
The sad truth is that credit card numbers get stolen all the time. The best thing you can do to avoid this is to use caution each time you’re making a purchase.

When shopping online, pay close attention to the platform. If possible, use services like PayPal that keep your credit what is my credit card number number safe. Otherwise, check the company, make sure the website is secure and uses an SSL certificate.

Also, keep an eye out for phishing emails. If anything looks suspicious, don’t click any links and don’t download any attachments. Verify the sender or call your bank.
Finally, don’t forget to make sure your computer is protected against malware and spyware.

Bottom Line

The introduction of the credit card network and years of perfecting transaction methods have led to the credit card features we use today. Your credit card is packed with important information and although the process behind it may be complicated, it helps simplify your life and the way in which you make payments.

Find The Best Credit Cards For 2021

No single credit card is the best option for every family, every purchase or every budget. We've picked the best credit cards in a way designed to be the most helpful to the widest variety of readers.

Learn More

FAQs

What is a credit card number?

A credit card number is a long set of digits usually displayed on the front of the credit card. Its goal is to identify both the credit card issuer and the account holder. It also helps prevent fraud.

How long are credit card numbers?

Credit card numbers are usually made of 16 digits arranged in sets of four. American Express numbers contain 15 digits. Though rare, some credit card companies employ 19 digits.

How do people steal credit card numbers?

Phishing emails and calls are still one of the most common methods of theft. Spyware and malware are also increasingly common. But don’t forget about the good old-fashioned ways: mail and trash. If you throw your paper statements in the trash, make sure your card number can’t be read.

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Источник: https://www.forbes.com/advisor/credit-cards/what-does-your-credit-card-number-mean/

Advice on how to ask for credit card details on web forms and checkouts

Asking for card payment information online is a vital part of any online transactions journey. It is therefore commonplace, but surprisingly difficult to get right and make it as simple as possible for users to optimize your checkouts and forms.

This article provides some best practice and things to avoid when designing inputs to ask for credit card information. We will not cover trust symbols or signalling in this blog, or social proof, as they deserve articles that go into more depth. This will focus instead on the necessary inputs required to take card payment and how to make them as good as possible.

Discover whether your credit card fields are causing users to abandon by getting started with a Zuko free trial or demo.

Some data

Take for following data for a credit card field, taken from Zuko's form analytics data:

We can see that over 40% of users who interact with either version of this card field have to return to it at least once. We can also see that for abandoned sessions in this form, users return to the Credit Card field at least twice - that trying to enter credit card information three what is my credit card number (2 field returns means a user interacted once, then came back twice, making 3 in total). 

Across a sample of Zuko clients, we saw that between 40 and 50% of users return to credit card fields at least once. This is a fairly significant number of people who do not enter their information correctly on the first attempt. For a smooth checkout experience, it should be a priority to reduce this.

For more advice on how to improve form conversion, check out Zuko's Big Guide to Form Optimization and Analytics.

Which payment cards are accepted?

Ideally your website accept all common card types, but those with more unusual cards may seek reassurance that their card is accepted - for example, those with Amex or Discover cards may have experienced real life situation where their card have not been accepted, so will look for a logo or image to reassure them it is accepted online.

Often these symbols appear before entering the information itself, at the point where a customer initially selects what type of payment they are choosing (for example if you offer the option to pay via Paypal, credit, or Klarna):

What information do I need to ask?

In order to process a payment via credit card, you need the following information:

  • Card number
  • Cardholder Name
  • Expiry Date
  • Security Code
  • Billing Address

Cutting out unnecessary fields

In recent years we’ve seen an improvement in this regard, but there are still forms out there that ask for additional and unnecessary information.

Two examples:

Card type

You (the merchant) can determine the payment type from the first digits entered, and you therefore do not need to ask for this extra information from users.

For example:

3 - travel/entertainment cards (such as American Express and Diners Club)

4 - Visa

5 - MasterCard

6 - Discover Card

Start Date

This may have been a requirement in the past, but is no longer needed in order to take payment, so cut it.

Each additional field in a form adds to the cognitive load of a user, even if they don’t fill it out - in other words, the form requires more effort the more information you’re asking for, even if it is not requirement. Trim where possible.

We will not cover address fields in this article, as they deserve a blog in their own right. That leaves us with Card Holder Name, Card Number, Expiry Date and Security Code.

How should I label my fields?

This sounds like it should be extremely straightforward, but there are a couple of traps here.

Card Holder

Remember, you’re looking for the name, as it appears on the card not the person’s full name or name on the bank account. So labelling your field like this:

May in fact be confusing. Is this asking for my full name? Stick with either ‘Name on Card’ or ‘Name (as it appears on card)’

You can also use help text:

The above is a long winded way of asking for the same information.

Security Code

Those extra numbers you need in order to be able to take card payments. Different companies have different naming conventions: 

  • card verification value (CVV2, Visa)
  • card verification code (CVC, Mastercard)
  • card identification number (CID, Amex, 4 digits)

Rather than picking one of these and potentially confusing users who refer to it by a different name, its best to go broad (“Security Code”) and then help users.

An image like this is very useful:

Remember that these codes site in different places for different card types and for AMEX users, this code is 4 digits long (we’ve seen security code fields that limit you to three characters and therefore break for AMEX users).

General field labelling best practices also apply - labels should be visible at all times, even after a user enters information into fields, and at no point should you rely only on icons, like the below:

What what is my credit card number a padlock symbol mean? My pin number? A password? Icons can be ambiguous and unhelpful - side with clarity, and have labels be always visible, and as descriptive and clear as possible.

What format should data be provided in? Accepting user inputs and reducing errors

Card numbers can be typed by users:

  • As one single long number
  • As four sets of four numbers separated by dashes
  • As four sets of four numbers separated by spaces

You have two choices in how to deal with this

  1. Inform users of what format to type their card number in and restrict their inputs
  2. Allow users to type information how they want, and you accept it and transform it into a format that fits with your data

For option 2 above, you can either transform the data ‘in real time’ as the user is typing, or change the data at the point of submission. Our advice would be the latter, since the former is effectively just a way to restrict user inputs, the difference being that you are explicitly showing the user how you are doing this.

However, if you are only going to accept one format, help users avoid mistakes. One way to do this is to restrict inputs within a card field to numeric characters only (since you know alpha and special keys will always be invalid) - this will also ignore food challenges in houston bar presses too.

This form, adds spaces in as you type them, so the number reflects the layout on the front of a card:

Avoid drop downs wherever possible

For payment details, you may be tempted to ask for the expiry date in the form of a drop down:

Try and avoid this, as drop downs can be problematic for users, as we’ve discussed elsewhere. Instead, a single input box is directv pay bill over the phone to complete:

Be sure to set the field type as ‘tel’ in the HTML so that mobile users will see a numeric keyboard by default too:

If you'd like to find out more about why drop downs are bad for online users, head over to our blog about it.

Error messages - clear, unambiguous, helpful

Despite your best efforts, users will still occasionally make mistakes. When they do, it is vital that you help them notice and correct their errors quickly and easily.

Our criteria for error messages is that they be clear, unambiguous and helpful. Many error messages fail to meet this criteria. For example:

I have entered a card number that is too short, but the error does not highlight exactly where I’ve made my mistake. The message is also confusing and deeply unhelpful. 

On the same site, if I enter a two digit Security Code:

This is ambiguous, since the actual error is that I’ve only entered two digits instead of three. The site knows this and could take steps to be more helpful.

Compare the above to this:

Next to the field in question, highlighted in red, with a very helpful guide as to why exactly I cannot enter this card number.

Card number errors are often unhelpful:

In the above case, I have entered dashes (and too many of them at that). A more helpful error message might be ‘Please only enter numbers and avoid special characters or dashes’.

Here are some more unhelpful messages:

Being ‘not valid’ is something computers say, and doesn’t help users correct their mistake. Is the number too short, or too long? Have I missed it entirely? Have I entered spaces when I shouldn’t have? Is the date in the past? Your error messages should not only highlight mistakes but help fix them too. Checkout our dedicated article on implementing error messages correctly for more information.

Pulling it all together

When asking for card information therefore, remember these key points:

  • Ask for the minimum amount of information you require
  • Label fields clearly, and provide additional information where needed (for Security code for example)
  • Accept multiple user inputs and formats if possible. If not, help users avoid mistakes by restricting inputs that are not valid
  • Make error messages clear, unambiguous and helpful

If this has been of use and you would like to know more about how to improve your form and checkout conversion, contact us on [email protected] or sign up for a demo or trial

Источник: https://www.zuko.io/blog/asking-for-credit-card-information-in-online-forms

Primary Account Number (PAN)

What Is a Primary Account Number?

The term primary account number refers to a 14- 15- 16- or even up to 19-digit number generated as a unique identifier designated for a primary account. Primary account numbers are also called payment card numbers as they are found on payment cards like credit and debit cards. This account number is either embossed or laser-printed and is found on the front of the card.

Primary account numbers are either embossed or laser-printed and can be found on the front of a card.

Understanding Primary Account Numbers

Primary account numbers are unique identifiers for different payment cards like credit and debit cards, providing information about the cardholder such as the name, balance, credit limit. PANs may also be used to identify other types of cards that store value such as a gift or prepaid card.

Because they may be the only number associated with a particular account—as in the case of a credit card—primary account numbers are www prudential com online retirement com called account numbers. In other cases, they may not identify the exact account information about the associated account. For instance, a debit card number does not reflect or identify the account numbers of any linked checking, savings, or other accounts.

The primary account number is typically generated when an account is opened. Therefore, it is usually the first account in a series that may be opened by a customer at a financial institution. The primary account number is also usually the number identified with a tradeline on an individual’s credit report. PANs are able to support account record keeping and resolution if issues should arise with the account.

Key Takeaways

  • A primary account number is a 14, 15, or 16 digit number generated as a unique identifier for a primary account.
  • Primary account numbers are issued to payment cards such as credit and debit cards as well as other cards that store value like a gift card.
  • Although they may be used as an identifier, PANs don't always provide exact account information as is the case with debit cards.
  • PANs can be used to support account record keeping and resolution.

Special Considerations

The very first digit of a primary account number is called the major industry identifier, which identifies the type of credit card by issuing company

  • American Express cards start with a 3
  • Visa cards start with a 4
  • MasterCard cards start with a 5
  • Discover cards start with a 6
  • Certain airline credit cards start with a 1 or 2
  • Petroleum company cards start with a 7
  • Certain telecommunications and health care cards discovery benefits hsa customer service with an 8

The first six digits identify the credit card network associated with the card, such as 601100 for Discover cards. The last digit is called the checksum number which helps prevent criminals from creating fraudulent credit card numbers. The numbers in between the first six digits and the last digit uniquely identify the customer’s account.

Primary Account Number Security

Credit card companies such as Visa ask merchants to take precautions to protect customers’ primary account numbers. One such guideline is called PAN truncation. Visa says merchants are not required to store full account numbers. Doing so presents a security risk if there is a data breach. In the United States, a federal law called the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act of 2003 (FACTA) prohibits merchants from printing more than the last 5 digits of a cardholder’s account number on a receipt. Merchants are also prohibited from printing the card’s expiration date.

Primary Account Numbers vs. Secondary Account Numbers

Financial institutions and lenders may issue debit and credit cards may to a secondary user authorized by the primary account holder. If an account has a secondary account holder, cards may both use the primary account number. Some institutions, though, have a card-issuing policy that allows the secondary user to have a secondary account number.

Business credit card accounts operate a little differently. The primary account number for corporate credit cards doesn't appear on any employee’s credit card. In this case, the credit card company issues each employee a card with separate, secondary account numbers. This makes it easier for companies to identify and track charges based on each employee's card usage.

Источник: https://www.investopedia.com/terms/p/primary-account-number-pan.asp

Credit card number

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Источник: https://www.creditcards.com/credit-card-news/glossary/term-credit-card-number/

You might regard your credit card as a friend, someone who’s always there to buy you lunch or a major appliance. But what to do if you lose your credit nyc food stamp income guidelines 2018 wants to lose a friend.

If you lose your credit card, don’t leave it hanging. It’s time to swing into action, before someone, like a fraudster, milks your plastic buddy for all it’s worth.

Quickness counts. Here are five steps to take if your credit card is lost or stolen.

Step 1. Call your credit card issuer

Call your credit card issuer immediately to report the loss or theft of your missing card. Typically, you would check the back of the card for the telephone number to call. That’s not an option when your card has been lost or stolen.

Don’t panic. You can find your credit card issuer’s phone number on your credit card statement or online. You may be able to report your loss on the card issuer’s website or at a bank branch.

Keep in mind that federal law limits your liability for unauthorized charges. The most you'll pay is $50. But act fast. You’ll want to resolve the matter before anyone starts racking up bogus transactions and fraudulent charges on your card.

Tip: If you report your lost or stolen card before anyone uses it, you won’t be liable for any unauthorized charges.

Step 2. Get prepped with information

Your credit card issuer will need to verify your identity. You’ll likely need to supply information such as your name, address and Social Security number.

Your issuer may want to know when your card was lost or stolen and when you made your last charge. They may review recent transactions with you to see if any of them appear to be fraudulent.

Your issuer will cancel your account and mail you a new credit card with a new account number.

Make sure to update your mobile wallet if it also includes the lost card as a means of payment.

Getting your lost card replaced should have no effect on your credit report or credit score. Just remember that if you were using the lost card to make automatic payments for you, make sure you provide those vendors your new card number. In the short term, you may have to make manual payments. It’s important to continue making your what time does the bank open on friday on time.

Step 3. Follow up and keep records

It’s a good idea to follow up after reporting your loss. Send your credit card issuer a letter or an email. Here’s what to conclude:

  • Your account number.
  • The date and time you noticed your card was missing.
  • When and how you reported the loss to the issuer.

Make a note of when you sent your letter. Keep a copy for yourself.

Step 4. Check your credit card statement

Remember to closely review your credit card statement after you’ve reported your card lost.

If you see any charges that appear fraudulent or unfamiliar, call your credit card company as soon as possible.

Step 5. Check your insurance coverage

Some homeowner’s and renter’s insurance policies cover your liability for credit card theft. While the maximum you would have to pay out of pocket is $50, it may be worth checking to see if your insurance policy would cover that amount.

You might also want to consider adding coverage for lost cards to your policy, if it’s available.

Keep in mind that some credit card issuers offer zero liability as a card feature. In such cases, adding coverage through a what is my credit card number policy might not be necessary.

Things you can do to prevent future lost or stolen credit cards

There are a lot of ways to lose a credit card. You might lose your wallet—and your card. You might leave your card at a checkout counter. You might slip it into your purse only to have it slip out.

It’s a good idea to take steps to help prevent the loss or theft of a credit card in the future.

Here are some suggestions, along with a few tips to consider just in case you do lose a card:

  • Carry only the cards you need.
  • Keep your credit card securely in your wallet or purse. Don’t break with routine and, say, slip your card in a breast pocket or top of your sock.
  • Cut up old credit cards before you throw them away. Make sure you cut through the account number.
  • Keep track of your cards and store ones you don’t use in a secure place.
  • Keep a record of your credit card information in a safe location. Consider including account numbers, expiration dates, and telephone numbers for each issuer. That way, you’ll be ready to report a lost or stolen credit card when you need to.
  • Check your credit card statements as soon as they arrive. Look for charges you don’t think you made.
  • Guard your account number. Identity thieves don't always need your credit card to commit identity fraud. The account number might be enough. Be careful not to write your account number down on paper or anywhere what is my credit card number might find it.
  • Avoid sharing your credit card number over the phone unless you made the call. And don’t forget to make sure no one is eavesdropping.

Bottom line: It’s a good idea to know what to do when you lose a credit card. After all, you want to help protect yourself from credit card fraud.

It’s also smart to remember to treat your card with care and respect.

That’s what friends do.

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Источник: https://www.lifelock.com/learn/credit-finance/what-to-do-if-you-lose-a-credit-card

How to Identify a Credit Card by the Account Number

When accepting credit card numbers over the phone from customers, you can easily identify the type of card without asking the customer. While each credit card has a unique string of numbers, in varying lengths, the first one or two digits will reveal the issuer of the card. You can also note other characteristics of the number to help you confirm the evidence.

Identifying by the First Digit

Simply noting the first digit of the credit card account number can help you narrow down or identify the issuer. Credit cards, such as MasterCard, Visa, and Discover, bank of montreal number have unique, identifying numbers as their first digits, with the exception of American Express, Diner's Club and Carte Blanche, which share the younique bb cream first digit: the number 3. MasterCard's unique first digit is 5, while Visa's is always 4. A Discover card's first digit is consistently the number 6.

Identifying by Two or More Digits

You can further identify credit cards that start with the same first number by analyzing two or more digits. For example, even though American Express, Diner's Club and Carte Blanche all start with the number 3, you can confirm American Express numbers if the first digit, 3, is followed by a 4 or a 7. However, if a zero, 6 or 8 follow the 3, the credit card number belongs to a Diner's Club or Carte Blanche account.

Valid Lengths of Account Numbers

Some of the more common issuers of cards have between 13 and 16 digits. Each type of account number has specific lengths, which can serve as a secondary method to identify the type of credit card. For example, Visa account numbers can be up to 19 digits. If you see a credit card number that starts with a 4 and contains 19 digits, you can assume it's a Visa. Mastercard and Discover account numbers contain 16 digits. American Express contains 15 digits, and Diner's Club and Carte Blanche contain 14 digits.

Categories of Issuing Entities

The first digit of every credit card serves as a major industry identifier, or MII. For example, if the first digit of a card number is a 7, the card is issued by an entity related to the petroleum industry, such as a gasoline brand. Digits 4 and 5 – Visa and MasterCard – relate to the banking and financial industry. The number 6 – Discover – represents merchandizing and banking.

Account numbers beginning with 3 – American Express, Diner's Club and Carte Blanche – tie their issuing entity to the travel and entertainment category. The numbers 1 and 2 relate to airlines or other industry assignments, while the number 8 identifies telecommunications or other industry assignments. A number 9 represents a national assignment entity.

References

Resources

Writer Bio

Based in Texas, Cynthia Measom has been writing various parenting, business and finance and education articles since 2011. Her articles have appeared on websites such as The Bump and Motley Fool. Measom received a Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of Texas at Austin.

Источник: https://smallbusiness.chron.com/identify-credit-card-account-number-61050.html

3 Replies to “What is my credit card number”

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