what is the total population of usa

their COVID-19 cases or population, not necessarily the most deaths overall. Georgia United Kingdom United States Czechia Philippines Germany Greece. 98% of the US population lives in the Contiguous United States. About 12% of the US 39.4% of California's entire population are Hispanics or Latinos. List of countries ranked by Population. 3, United States, 332,639,104 The total population presents one overall measure of the potential impact of.

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United States Population of the 50 States (1630 - 2021)

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Data and Statistics About the U.S.

Find data about the U.S., such as demographic and economic data, population, and maps. Get information about the 2020 U.S. Census.

U.S. Census Data and Statistics

The United States Census Bureau provides data about the nation’s people and economy. Every 10 years, it conducts the Population and Housing Census, in which every resident in the United States is counted. The agency also gathers data through more than 100 other surveys of households and businesses every one to five years. You can explore the results of the surveys or find popular quick facts.

The 2020 Census ended in October, 2020. Take a look back at the process.

How is data from the census used?

Your responses can help determine how much funding your local community will receive for public services. Census population data is used to divide the seats in the U.S. House of Representatives among the 50 states. It can also be used to draw boundaries for state legislative and school districts.

Besides using census data for the benefit of public services, you can also use it for genealogical research. To protect the privacy of people who respond to the U.S. Census, all records are kept confidential for 72 years. Find out what genealogical information is available and where you can access it.

What statistics can I get from the census?

Get population and demographic information about the country, individual states, and more:

View the latest QuickFacts statistics and estimates for the most popular topics.

How can I see the results of the census?

Explore a variety of data:

Do I have to respond to the census?

By law, everyone is required to be counted in the census. If you don’t respond, the U.S. Census Bureau will follow up with you in person by visiting your home. 

Find Data and Statistics from the Government

Many government agencies have statistical information on a wide range of topics. You may need to do further research to find out which agency has the information you are looking for or can help you find it.

Remember, keywords are important when doing a search. Make sure your keywords can help narrow down the search results. For example, instead of trying a search for "education statistics," try something more specific like "campus security statistics" or "graduation rates."

Federal Government Data and Statistics

These federal agency programs collect, analyze, and disseminate statistical data and information:

  • Bureau of Economic Analysis collects information on economic indicators, national and international trade, accounts, and industry.
  • Bureau of Justice Statistics reports on justice systems, crime, criminal offenders, and victims of crime.
  • Bureau of Labor Statistics measures labor market activity, working conditions, and price changes in the U.S. economy.
  • Bureau of Transportation Statistics provides data on airline on-time performance, pirates at sea, transportation safety and availability, motorcycle trends, and more.
  • Census Bureau is the main source of data about our nation's people and economy.
  • DAP Public Dashboard provides a window into how people are interacting with the government online.
  • Data.gov is the home of the U.S. Government's open data. Find federal, state, and local data, tools, and resources to conduct research, build apps, design data visualizations, and more. 
  • Economic Research Service informs public and private decision making on economic and policy issues related to agriculture, food, the environment, and rural development.  
  • Energy Information Administration provides data on U.S. use of coal, natural gas, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and more.
  • Internal Revenue Service Tax Statistics examine tax returns to report on such things as sources of income, exemptions, use of medical savings accounts, migration, and geographic data, tax information on foreign corporations controlled by U.S. parent corporations, exports, international boycotts, and investments and activities in the U.S. by foreign persons.
  • National Agricultural Statistical Service researches data on food production and supply, organic sales, chemical use, demographics of U.S. producers, and more. Every five years it conducts the Census of Agriculture that provides agricultural data for every county in the United States.
  • National Center for Education Statistics researches education in the United States. It publishes the Digest of Education Statistics, which includes international comparisons of students, and the annual report to Congress, The Condition of Education, which reports the progress of American education.
  • National Center for Health Statistics is the principal health statistics agency for improving the health of the American people.
  • National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics publishes data on the American science and engineering workforce and the progress of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education in the United States.
  • Office of Personnel Management provides statistics on the Federal civilian workforce through data sources such as FedScope.
  • Social Security Administration Office of Research Evaluation and Statistics offers data on social security program benefits, payments, covered workers, and more.
  • USAspending.gov is the official source for spending data for the U.S. government. Learn about the size of the federal budget, and how the government spends that money on a national level and around the country.

You can also search a federal agency's website to see what types of statistical information it provides. Find the U.S. government department or agency you want to search.

State and Local Government Data and Statistics

State and local government agencies also compile and maintain statistical information. Contact a state or local government for more information:

Maps

The National Map offers mapping products from federal, state, and local partners on a variety of topics, such as recreation, environmental resources, scientific analysis, and emergency response.

Other maps cover:

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Last Updated: December 7, 2020

Источник: https://www.usa.gov/statistics

Total Jewish Population in the United States

Year

Jewish Population

Year

Jewish Population

1654

25

1937

4,641,000-4,831,180

1700

200-300

1940

4,770,000-4,975,000

1776

1,000-2,500

1950

4,500,000-5,000,000

1790

1,243-3,000

1960

5,367,000-5,531,500

1800

2,000-2,500

1970

5,370,000-6,000,000

1820

2,650-5,000

1980

5,500,000-5,920,890

1826

6,000

1992

5,828,000

1830

4,000-6,000

2009

6,544,000

1840

15,000

2011

6,588,065

1848

50,000

2012

6,721,680

1850

50,000-100,000

2013

6,721,965

1860

150,000-200,000

2014

6,769,000

1870

200,000

2015

7,160,000

1880

230,000-280,000

2016

6,856,304

1890

400,000-475,000

2017

6,850,865

1900

937,800-1,058,135

2018

6,925,475

1910

1,508,000-2,349,754

20196,968,600

1920

3,300,000-3,604,580

20207,153,065

1927

4,228,029

20217,300,000

* Jewish population here is defined as the Enlarged Jewish Population which includes:

(A) Core Population - Jews born to Jewish parents or converted to Judaism;
(B) Other Persons of Jewish Parentage;
(C) Respective non-Jewish households members

Totals may not be exact due to rounding.

° For methodological reasons, the exact numbers are probably inflated slightly as some individuals may be double-counted.
^ Figure is less than 0.1 and rounds to 0.


Sources: Ira M. Sheskin and Arnold Dashefsky, Eds.,  “Jewish Population in the United States, 2012,” American Jewish Year Book (2012) (Dordrecht: Springer) p. 143-211;
American Jewish Historical Society, American Jewish Desk Reference, (The Philip Leff Group, Inc., 1999), p. 35;
American Jewish Year Book 2006 (NY: American Jewish Committee, 2006);
North American Jewish Databank (2010);
North American Jewish Databank (2011);
The American Jewish Population Project;
Ira M. Sheskin & Arnold Dashefsky, “United States Jewish Population, 2018,” in Arnold Dashefsky & Ira M. Sheskin, Eds., American Jewish Year Book, 2018, (Dordrecht: Springer, 2019), pp. 251-347.
Ira M. Sheskin & Arnold Dashefsky, “United States Jewish Population, 2020,” in Arnold Dashefsky & Ira M. Sheskin, Eds., American Jewish Year Book, 2020, (Cham, SUI: Springer, 2021).
Ira M. Sheskin and Arnold Dashefsky, “United States Jewish Population, 2021,” in Arnold Dashefsky and Ira M. Sheskin (eds.), The American Jewish Year Book, 2021, (Cham: Springer Nature, 2021).

Источник: https://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jewish-population-in-the-united-states-nationally

Rural Health Information Hub

The U.S. population is aging. Today, there are more than 46 million older adults age 65 and older living in the U.S.; by 2050, that number is expected to grow to almost 90 million. Between 2020 and 2030 alone, the time the last of the baby boom cohorts reach age 65, the number of older adults is projected to increase by almost 18 million. This means by 2030, 1 in 5 Americans is projected to be 65 years old and over.

The issue of aging is especially important in rural areas because residents tend to be older, on average, than those in urban areas. Older adults also disproportionately live in rural areas. In 2010, one-quarter of all adults 65 years and older lived in rural areas.

This map, based on 2010 Census Data, shows the percent of the population over age 65 by county:

Population Over Age 65 by County

With an aging population comes an increasing need for healthcare, long-term care, and social services to support older adults as they age. Adults over age 65 have different healthcare needs than children and younger adults because they may have multiple chronic health problems such as diabetes, heart disease, arthritis, depression, and hypertension. It is estimated that 90% of adults over age 65 experience one or more chronic condition, and need specific treatments and medical care, setting them apart from the rest of the population.

Older adults not only rely on their primary care physician, but also on long-term care services and supports. Teams of physicians, long-term care assistants, nurses, social workers, and family caregivers often work together to provide tailored and coordinated care to older adults. Access to health care is critical for older adults to age in place.

Because many retirees are choosing to move to rural destinations and keep their independent lifestyle, many rural counties are naturally becoming retirement communities. However, these communities have fewer options for geriatric care teams and accommodations specifically designed for older adults, such as retirement communities and assisted living facilities.

Resources to Learn More

Aging Statistics
Website
Provides general statistics on the aging of the U.S. population, including what percentage of the population is over 65.
Organization(s): Federal Interagency Forum on Aging Related Statistics

Projections of the Size and Composition of the U.S. Population: 2014 to 2060
Document
Gives an overview of the size and characteristics of the older adult population today, as well as projections about the population through 2060.
Author(s): Colby, S., & Ortman, J.
Organization(s): U.S. Census Bureau
Date: 3/2015

Источник: https://www.ruralhealthinfo.org/toolkits/aging/1/demographics

Half of the US population lives in these 9 states

More than 330 million people live in the United States, but that doesn't mean the population is distributed evenly. Far from it.

Using the latest US Census data, we determined that just nine states — California, Texas, Illinois, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York, Georgia and Florida — account for half of the entire US population.

US Map Population
Florence Fu/Tech Insider
For 41 US states to have the same number of residents as the remaining nine, you have to consider their relative population densities.

States like California and New York have high average densities of 251 and 420 people per square mile because of the millions of people crammed into major cities. That's even taking into account both states' many suburbs, where people are more spread out. 

States without heavily-populated cities have very different numbers. Alaska, the largest state by area, ranks 50th in population density, with only 1.3 people per square mile.

The more granular you get in how you slice up the US population, the more pronounced the differences in density become. Just look at the breakdown by county:

haf of US population county map
Business Insider/Andy Kiersz, data from US Census Bureau

After a while, you begin to wonder whether there's anyone living here at all.

Источник: https://www.businessinsider.com/half-of-the-us-population-lives-in-just-9-states-2016-6

States ranked by percentage of population fully vaccinated: Dec. 3

Vermont has the highest percentage of its population fully vaccinated against COVID-19, according to the CDC's COVID-19 vaccine distribution and administration data tracker.

The CDC's data tracker compiles data from healthcare facilities and public health authorities. It updates daily to report the total number of people in each state who have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19. The numbers reported by the CDC may vary from the numbers published on individual states' public health websites, as there may be reporting lags between the states and the CDC. 

As of 6 a.m. EDT Dec. 2, a total of 197,838,728 Americans had been fully vaccinated, or 59.6 percent of the country's population, according to the CDC's data.

Below are the states and Washington, D.C., ranked by the percentage of their population that has been fully vaccinated against COVID-19, according to the CDC. 

1. Vermont
Number of people fully vaccinated: 456,006
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 73.08

2. Rhode Island
Number of people fully vaccinated: 771,645
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 72.84

3. Maine
Number of people fully vaccinated: 974,851
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 72.52

4. Connecticut
Number of people fully vaccinated: 2,573,654
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 72.19

5. Massachusetts
Number of people fully vaccinated: 4,924,144
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 71.44

6. New York 
Number of people fully vaccinated: 13,361,820
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 68.69

7. New Jersey
Number of people fully vaccinated: 6,043,088
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 68.04

8. Maryland
Number of people fully vaccinated: 4,103,709
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 67.88

9. Washington
Number of people fully vaccinated: 4,972,495
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 65.3

10. Virginia
Number of people fully vaccinated: 5,564,468
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 65.19

11. New Hampshire
Number of people fully vaccinated: 882,647
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 64.91

12. District of Columbia
Number of people fully vaccinated: 456,802
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 64.73

13. Oregon
Number of people fully vaccinated: 2,705,818
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 64.15

14. New Mexico
Number of people fully vaccinated: 1,336,646
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 63.75

15. Colorado
Number of people fully vaccinated: 3,655,321
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 63.47

16. California
Number of people fully vaccinated: 25,059,980
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 63.42

17. Minnesota
Number of people fully vaccinated: 3,539,329
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 62.76

18. Delaware
Number of people fully vaccinated: 601,627
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 61.78

19. Illinois
Number of people fully vaccinated: 7,805,286
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 61.6

20. Florida
Number of people fully vaccinated: 13,227,652
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 61.59

21. Hawaii
Number of people fully vaccinated: 867,081
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 61.24

22. Wisconsin
Number of people fully vaccinated: 3,477,030
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 59.72

23. Pennsylvania
Number of people fully vaccinated: 7,513,481
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 58.69

24. Nebraska
Number of people fully vaccinated: 1,115,660
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 57.67

25. Iowa
Number of people fully vaccinated: 1,795,954
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 56.92

26. Utah
Number of people fully vaccinated: 1,787,152
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 55.74

27. Arizona
Number of people fully vaccinated: 3,995,852
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 54.9

28. South Dakota
Number of people fully vaccinated: 485,472
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 54.88

29. Kansas
Number of people fully vaccinated: 1,598,588
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 54.87

30. Texas
Number of people fully vaccinated: 15,909,783
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 54.87

31. Michigan
Number of people fully vaccinated: 5,470,903
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 54.78

32. Nevada
Number of people fully vaccinated: 1,684,342
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 54.68

33. Alaska
Number of people fully vaccinated: 398,122
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 54.42

34. North Carolina
Number of people fully vaccinated: 5,705,077
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 54.4

35. Ohio
Number of people fully vaccinated: 6,224,765
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 53.25

36. Kentucky
Number of people fully vaccinated: 2,337,202
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 52.31

37. Montana
Number of people fully vaccinated: 555,986
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 52.02

38. Oklahoma
Number of people fully vaccinated: 2,046,492
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 51.72

39. South Carolina
Number of people fully vaccinated: 2,655,290
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 51.57

40. Missouri
Number of people fully vaccinated: 3,138,356
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 51.13

41. Indiana
Number of people fully vaccinated: 3,414,969
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 50.73

42. Georgia
Number of people fully vaccinated: 5,281,455
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 49.74

43. Tennessee
Number of people fully vaccinated: 3,392,571
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 49.68

44. Arkansas
Number of people fully vaccinated: 1,493,672
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 49.5

45. Louisiana
Number of people fully vaccinated: 2,278,316
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 49.01

46. North Dakota
Number of people fully vaccinated: 373,061
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 48.95

47. West Virginia
Number of people fully vaccinated: 876,911
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 48.93

48. Mississippi
Number of people fully vaccinated: 1,401,882
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 47.1

49. Alabama
Number of people fully vaccinated: 2,268,570
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 46.27

50. Wyoming
Number of people fully vaccinated: 264,744
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 45.74

51. Idaho
Number of people fully vaccinated: 810,070
Percentage of population fully vaccinated: 45.33

 

 

 

 

 

 

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tal of 134,445,595 Americans had received at least one shot, or 40.5 percent of the country's population

Источник: https://www.beckershospitalreview.com/public-health/states-ranked-by-percentage-of-population-vaccinated-march-15.html

Stately Knowledge: Facts about the United States

Return to Stately Knowledge Home

See the Area Measurement section of the U.S. Census’s Census 2000 Geographic Definitions page for definitions of Size, Land Area, and Water Area.

Source for Population: 2020 Population and Housing State Data

Source for Population Density: Population density in the U.S. by federal states including the District of Columbia in 2020

Source for Size, Land Area, and Water Area: United States Summary: 2010 Population and Housing Unit Counts

States in the US are all very different from each other. So, it comes as no surprise that they have very different population estimates. Also, since the resident population of the United States continues to grow, state populations are in a constant state of flux. As of February 2021, the population of the United States is slightly over 330 million.

The United States Census Bureau’s population statistics encompass the 50 states, the District of Columbia and the five US territories, including Puerto Rico. The official Census takes into account the total number of people residing in the US, including citizens, permanent residents, and long-term visitors. Federal employees serving abroad, both civilian and military, as well as their dependents, are counted in their home state.

This population of the United States is unevenly distributed across all states and territories. Generally speaking, states located around the border – East Coast, West Coast and the South – are more populous than those that are more interior – the Midwest and the Great Plains. There are a few exceptions to this rule; the state of Illinois, for example, is located in the Midwest but is highly populated, mainly in the Chicago area.

The table below lists all US states ranked by population.

RankStatePopulation
All United States331,449,281
1California39,538,223
2Texas29,145,505
3Florida21,538,187
4New York20,201,249
5Pennsylvania12,812,508
6Illinois12,702,379
7Ohio11,799,448
8Georgia10,711,908
9North Carolina10,439,388
10Michigan10,077,331
11New Jersey9,288,994
12Virginia8,631,393
13Washington7,705,281
14Arizona7,151,502
15Massachusetts7,029,917
16Tennessee6,910,840
17Indiana6,785,528
18Maryland6,177,224
19Missouri6,154,913
20Wisconsin5,893,718
21Colorado5,773,714
22Minnesota5,706,494
23South Carolina5,118,425
24Alabama5,024,279
25Louisiana4,657,757
26Kentucky4,505,836
27Oregon4,237,256
28Oklahoma3,959,353
29Connecticut3,605,944
30Utah3,271,616
31Iowa3,190,369
32Nevada3,104,614
33Arkansas3,011,524
34Mississippi2,961,279
35Kansas2,937,880
36New Mexico2,117,522
37Nebraska1,961,504
38Idaho1,839,106
39West Virginia1,793,716
40Hawaii1,455,271
41New Hampshire1,377,529
42Maine1,362,359
43Rhode Island1,097,379
44Montana1,084,225
45Delaware989,948
46South Dakota886,667
47North Dakota779,094
48Alaska733,391
49Washington, D.C.689,545
50Vermont643,077
51Wyoming576,851

The United States is the third largest country in the world by area and ranks just behind Russia and Canada. All 50 states in the US vary drastically in area. The largest state, Alaska is more than 400 times larger than Rhode Island, the smallest state. In the US, a large area does not mean a large population. Texas, for example, is bigger than California, but the latter is more populous.

When it comes to size comparison, Alaska is staggeringly big; bigger than the next three largest states (Texas, California and Montana) combined, and twice the size of the second largest state, Texas. The smallest state, Rhode Island could fit into Alaska nearly 486 times. And if Washington DC were a state, it would certainly be the smallest.
The 10 largest states by area – Alaska, Texas, California, Montana, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, Colorado, Oregon and Wyoming – are located west of the Mississippi River. The 7 smallest states – Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Connecticut, Delaware, and Rhode Island – are among the 13 original colonies and are located in the northeast part of the country.

The table below lists all US states ranked by size.

RankStateSize
(land & water)
(square miles)
All United States3,796,742.23
1Alaska665,384.04
2Texas268,596.46
3California163,694.74
4Montana147,039.71
5New Mexico121,590.30
6Arizona113,990.30
7Nevada110,571.82
8Colorado104,093.67
9Oregon98,378.54
10Wyoming97,813.01
11Michigan96,713.51
12Minnesota86,935.83
13Utah84,896.88
14Idaho83,568.95
15Kansas82,278.36
16Nebraska77,347.81
17South Dakota77,115.68
18Washington71,297.95
19North Dakota70,698.32
20Oklahoma69,898.87
21Missouri69,706.99
22Florida65,757.70
23Wisconsin65,496.38
24Georgia59,425.15
25Illinois57,913.55
26Iowa56,272.81
27New York54,554.98
28North Carolina53,819.16
29Arkansas53,178.55
30Alabama52,420.07
31Louisiana52,378.13
32Mississippi48,431.78
33Pennsylvania46,054.34
34Ohio44,825.58
35Virginia42,774.93
36Tennessee42,144.25
37Kentucky40,407.80
38Indiana36,419.55
39Maine35,379.74
40South Carolina32,020.49
41West Virginia24,230.04
42Maryland12,405.93
43Hawaii10,931.72
44Massachusetts10,554.39
45Vermont9,616.36
46New Hampshire9,349.16
47New Jersey8,722.58
48Connecticut5,543.41
49Delaware2,488.72
50Rhode Island1,544.89
51Washington, D. C.68.34
RankStateLand Area
(square miles)
All United States3,531,905.43
1Alaska570,640.95
2Texas261,231.71
3California155,779.22
4Montana145,545.80
5New Mexico121,298.15
6Arizona113,594.08
7Nevada109,781.18
8Colorado103,641.89
9Wyoming97,093.14
10Oregon95,988.01
11Idaho82,643.12
12Utah82,169.62
13Kansas81,758.72
14Minnesota79,626.74
15Nebraska76,824.17
16South Dakota75,811.00
17North Dakota69,000.80
18Missouri68,741.52
19Oklahoma68,594.92
20Washington66,455.52
21Georgia57,513.49
22Michigan56,538.90
23Iowa55,869.36
24Illinois55,518.93
25Wisconsin54,157.80
26Florida53,924.76
27Arkansas52,035.48
28Alabama50,645.33
29North Carolina48,617.91
30New York47,126.40
31Mississippi46,923.27
32Pennsylvania44,742.70
33Louisiana43,203.90
34Tennessee41,234.90
35Ohio40,860.69
36Virginia39,490.09
37Kentucky39,486.34
38Indiana35,826.11
39Maine30,842.92
40South Carolina30,060.70
41West Virginia24,038.21
42Maryland9,707.24
43Vermont9,216.66
44New Hampshire8,952.65
45Massachusetts7,800.06
46New Jersey7,354.22
47Hawaii6,422.63
48Connecticut4,842.36
49Delaware1,948.54
50Rhode Island1,033.81
51Washington, D. C.61.05
RankStateWater Area
(square miles)
All United States264,836.79
1Alaska94,743.10
2Michigan40,174.61
3Florida12,132.94
4Wisconsin11,338.57
5Louisiana9,174.23
6California7,915.52
7New York7,428.58
8Texas7,364.75
9Minnesota7,309.09
10North Carolina5,201.25
11Washington4,842.43
12Maine4,536.82
13Hawaii4,509.09
14Ohio3,964.89
15Virginia3,284.84
16Massachusetts2,754.33
17Utah2,727.26
18Maryland2,698.69
19Illinois2,394.62
20Oregon2,390.53
21South Carolina1,959.79
22Georgia1,911.66
23Alabama1,774.74
24North Dakota1,697.52
25Mississippi1,508.51
26Montana1,493.91
27New Jersey1,368.36
28Pennsylvania1,311.64
29South Dakota1,304.68
30Oklahoma1,303.95
31Arkansas1,143.07
32Missouri965.47
33Idaho925.83
34Kentucky921.46
35Tennessee909.36
36Nevada790.65
37Wyoming719.87
38Connecticut701.06
39Indiana593.44
40Delaware540.18
41Nebraska523.64
42Kansas519.64
43Rhode Island511.07
44Colorado451.78
45Iowa415.68
46Vermont399.71
47New Hampshire396.51
48Arizona396.22
49New Mexico292.15
50West Virginia191.83
51Washington, D. C.7.29

 

Источник: https://www.ipl.org/div/stateknow/popchart.html

3 ways that the U.S. population will change over the next decade

The U.S. has just entered the new decade of the 2020s.

What does our country look like today, and what will it look like 10 years from now, on Jan. 1, 2030? Which demographic groups in the U.S. will grow the most, and which groups will not grow as much, or maybe even decline in the next 10 years?

I am a demographer and I have examined population data from the U.S. Census Bureau and from the Population Division of the United Nations.

Projections show that whites will decline; the number of old people will increase; and racial minorities, mainly Hispanics, will grow the most, making them the main engine of demographic change in the U.S. for the next 10 years and beyond.

1. There will be more of us

The U.S. population today, at the start of 2020, numbers just over 331 million people.

The U.S. is the third largest country in the world, outnumbered only by the two demographic billionaires, China and India, at just over 1.4 billion and just under 1.4 billion, respectively.

Ten years from now, the U.S. population will have almost 350 million people. China and India will still be bigger, but India with 1.5 billion people will now be larger than China, with 1.46 billion.

2. The population will get older.

The U.S. is getting older and it’s going to keep getting older.

Today, there are over 74.1 million people under age 18 in the U.S. country. There are 56.4 million people age 65 and older.

Ten years from now, there will almost be as many old folks as there are young ones. The numbers of young people will have grown just a little to 76.3 million, but the numbers of old people will have increased a lot – to 74.1 million. A lot of these new elderly will be baby boomers.

For example, take the really old folks – people over the age of 100. How many centenarians are in the U.S. population today and how many are there likely to be 10 years from now?

According to demographers at the U.S. Census Bureau, the number of centenarians in the U.S. grew from over 53,000 in 2010 to over 90,000 in 2020. By 2030, there will most likely be over 130,000 centenarians in the U.S.

But this increase of centenarians by 2030 is only a small indication of their growth in later decades. In the year of 2046, the first group of surviving baby boomers will reach 100 years, and that’s when U.S. centenarians will really start to grow. By 2060 there will be over 603,000. That’s a lot of really old people.

I sometimes ask my undergraduate students how many of them have ever actually seen a person 100 years old or older. In my classes of 140 or more students, no more than maybe six raise their hands. Lots more college students will be raising their hands when they are asked that question in 2060.

3. Racial proportions will shift.

In 2020, non-Hispanic white people, hereafter called whites, are still the majority race in the U.S., representing 59.7% of the U.S. population.

In my research with the demographer Rogelio Saenz, we have shown that the white share of the U.S. population has been dropping since 1950 and it will continue to go down.

Today, after whites, the Hispanic population is the next biggest group at 18.7% of the U.S., followed by blacks and Asians.

What will the country look like racially in 2030? Whites will have dropped to 55.8% of the population, and Hispanics will have grown to 21.1%. The percentage of black and Asian Americans will also grow significantly.

So between now and 2030, whites as a proportion of the population will get smaller, and the minority race groups will all keep getting bigger.

Eventually, whites will become a minority, dropping below 50% of the U.S. population in around the year of 2045.

However, on the first day of 2020, whites under age 18 were already in the minority. Among all the young people now in the U.S., there are more minority young people than there are white young people.

Among old people age 65 and over, whites are still in the majority. Indeed white old people, compared to minority old people, will continue to be in the majority until some years after 2060.

Hispanics and the other racial minorities will be the country’s main demographic engine of population change in future years; this is the most significant demographic change Americans will see.

I’ve shown above how much older the U.S. population has become and will become in the years ahead. Were it not for the racial minorities countering this aging of the U.S. population, the U.S. by 2030 and later would have become even older than it is today and will be in 2030.

The Conversation

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Источник: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/nation/3-ways-that-the-u-s-population-will-change-over-the-next-decade

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