is popcorn cooked in olive oil good for you

Use olive oil as a healthier alternative to butter plus it gives the popcorn that delicious olive oil flavor. Yields. Makes about 10 cups. Ingredients. ⅓ cup. 4 tablespoons of popcorn 4 tablespoons of olive oil 2 tablespoons of olive oil 2-4 tablespoons of wasbi powder just depends on how hot you like it! Cook. My parents are telling me they can't be used for high temperature but sautéing isn't high temperature cooking right? And the smoke point of olive oil.

Is popcorn cooked in olive oil good for you -

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We haven’t been able to go to the movies for the past 6 months, so popcorn may have dropped off your radar. This week, we want remind you about the benefits of popcorn as a fun, healthy snack and talk about how to make your own at home. Note: this is NOT the extra-large tub of movie theater popcorn with extra “butter” (pumped out of a machine….ick!) and salt.

As an unprocessed whole grain, popcorn high in indigestible fiber. One 3-cup serving contains 3 grams of fiber, which is pretty good for a snack. Fiber helps with digestion and feeds your microbiome – the “good bacteria” in your gut will produce beneficial compounds if you give them lots of fiber. Those little hulls that catch in your teeth? They’ve got beta-carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin for your eyes, as well as polyphenols. If you make your own at home, popcorn is very low in fat and calories. Avoid packaged popcorn, which is not only expensive, but contains added oil and salt (and you don’t control the amount).

You might have heard that people with a digestive condition called diverticular disease can’t eat popcorn. This is a condition in which the walls of the gut have small pockets, or outpouchings. For years, it was thought that eating popcorn was bad because the indigestible fiber would catch in those pouches, causing inflammation (diverticulitis). However, that thinking has since changed and we now know that high-fiber foods such as popcorn do not trigger diverticulitis attacks. Of course, if your doctor has advised you not to eat popcorn, please follow that guidance.

Then, there’s the corn and GMO (genetically modified organisms) question. GM means that the organism (the plant) has had its genetic material changed in a way that does not occur naturally, such as to insert a gene that makes the plan more resistant to plant diseases or more able to survive when herbicides are applied. Upwards of 80% of field corn and sweet corn grown in the US has been genetically modified. People feel strongly about the potential health effects of GM foods on both sides.

The good news, if you are concerned about GMO? Popcorn is a distinct type of corn from field and sweet corn and has not been genetically modified. Any kind of popcorn you buy that was grown in the US – organic or not – is non-GMO. Most of the popcorn eaten throughout the world is grown in the US. However, you may still want to buy organic popcorn to avoid exposure to pesticides. Remember that by USDA standards, organic food cannot be genetically modified.

How to Pop Popcorn at Home (Hint: it’s so easy you don’t need a real “recipe”)

You’ve got options: here are a couple.

1) Go old school and use a pot on the stove. You need a heavy-bottomed pot (with a lid!) to heat evenly and avoid burning your popcorn. Pour enough oil to cover the bottom of the pot and warm it over medium-high heat. What type of oil? You have options here too. Popcorn starts popping at 180oC (356oF). Too hot, and you’ll burn your popcorn; but heat too slowly and the steam will escape from the tip of the kernels and they won’t actually pop.
Remember that oils have something called a “smoke point” – the temperature at which, when heated, they produce smoke. For most common oils, this is higher than 350oF, so you’re fine with any neutral oil such as canola, sunflower, avocado, grapeseed, or – our favorite for health reasons – olive oil. Olive oil has been shown to be stable at high temperatures. Stove-top popcorn is easy and quick, but requires attention. Stay close to your pot and adjust the heat as needed. If you’re concerned about GMOs, buy organic oil.
Add a couple of “test” kernels, cover the pot, and wait until they pop. Then add enough kernels to cover the bottom of the pot in an even layer. Cover the pot and remove from the heat for about 30 seconds. Return to heat and shake the pot gently as corn pops. Leave the lid open a crack to allow steam to escape; otherwise your popcorn will steam in the pot and won’t be as crisp.
Once popping slows to about 2 seconds between pops, remove from heat, open the lid away from your face, and pour into serving bowl. Sprinkle on any toppings right after popping, as the steam is still being released and the small amount of moisture will help the stick.

2) If you want a fun new kitchen gadget and don’t want to fire up the stove, another option is a collapsible silicone popcorn popper that you use in the microwave. You can put a little oil in the bottom (or not), add the kernels (capacity varies), and adjust the time based on your microwave’s power. It may take you a couple of tries to get the time just right. Don’t leave it in too long, or it will burn! There is no evidence that microwaving food is unsafe (as long as you use containers intended for microwaving, and are careful to avoid burns from steam). But, if you are not comfortable with it, go for option 1.

Topping suggestions (optional) – Just watch the salt.
• Brewer’s yeast
• Dried herbs
• Sprinkle of grated cheese (suggest a hard cheese like Parmesan)
• Salt (if not on a low-sodium diet)
What toppings do you like on popcorn? Share your faves on our Facebook group.

So, this Saturday night: cue up a movie on Netflix, fire up the stove with the biggest pan you can find (or the microwave), and enjoy a guilt-free, microbiome-friendly movie experience.

https://www.pcf.org/blog/popcorn-friend-or-foe/

Источник: https://www.pcf.org/blog/popcorn-friend-or-foe/

Fats and oils

We all need some fats in our diet. It’s getting the right balance of the different types of fats that will help keep your cholesterol and triglycerides levels and your heart healthy.

Why we need to eat some fats

  • for energy
  • to absorb some vitamins from food, these are the fat soluble vitamins, A, D E and K
  • for a healthy immune system
  • for our brains to function.

Types of fats

There are two main types of fat – saturated and unsaturated – and we need some of each. Eating a healthy balance of fats can help to lower your cholesterol levels. 

Saturated fats 

Too much saturated fat will raise your cholesterol. Cut down on foods high in saturated fat and replace them with foods higher in unsaturated fat. 

Saturated fats are usually solid at room temperature. Most foods foods high in saturated fats come from animals, as well as coconut products. For example:

  • dairy foods such as cream, cheese and full fat milk and yoghurt
  • butter and other solid fats such as ghee, lard and hard margarine
  • fatty and processed meats such as sausages and bacon
  • coconut and palm oil.

Read all about saturated fats 

Unsaturated fats

Unsaturated fats are more heart-healthy. There are different types of unsaturated fat known as monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, and they do different jobs in the body. It’s good to eat a range of foods so that you get both.

Unsaturated fats are found in plant foods and oily fish, and they are usually liquid at room temperature. They're found in:

  • oils from vegetables, nuts and seeds, such as sunflower, safflower, rapeseed, olive, peanut, walnut and corn oil
  • spreads based on these oils
  • nuts and seeds
  • avocado
  • oily fish such as herring, pilchards, mackerel, salmon and trout.

One type of unsaturated fat which are particularly good for you are omega 3 fats. These are the type found in oily fish. They're also found in flaxseed, linseed and hemp and foods that have been fortified with omega 3s. There are other types of unsaturated fats called omega 6 and omega 9s. Eating a variety of the foods above will help you to get enough of these. 

Trans fats

Like saturated fats, trans fats are bad for our health. They raise LDL cholesterol and lower HDL (good) cholesterol.

Trans fats are made when unsaturated fats such as vegetable oils are heated to high temperatures during food processing. Most food companies have now stopped adding trans fats to the food they make so most of us don’t eat a lot of trans fats.

Trans fats are sometimes present in pastries, cakes, biscuits, crackers, fried foods, takeaways and hard margarines. Look out for the words 'partially hydrogenated fat' on the label as they contain trans fats and avoid these as much as possible.

Some trans fats are present in dairy foods and red meats, but only in small amounts and these are thought to be safe to eat.

How much fat should I eat?

Fats are very high in energy so they can lead to weight gain, so you need to keep an eye on how much you eat in total.

About a third of your energy should come from fat. That’s about 70g for a woman and 90g for a man per day.

Keep the amount of saturated fat you eat down by swapping foods high in saturated fats for foods which are higher in unsaturated fats or low in fat altogether. Don’t simply eat more unsaturated fats as you could eat too much fat in total.

Check the labels on foods to see how much fat and saturated fat they contain. Some labels are colour-coded which helps you to make a quick decision. 

Simple swaps

Use these simple swaps to replace some high saturated fats foods with healthier options. 

Eat lessSwap for
Butter, ghee, lard, suet, goose fat, hard margarines, coconut oil and palm oil.Oils made from vegetables and seeds such as olive, rapeseed, sunflower and soya oil, and fat spreads made from these.
Fatty meat and processed meat products such as sausages, bacon, salami and canned meat.Lean meat, chicken or turkey with the skin removed.
White fish, and oily fish at least once a week. Have meat-free days, and instead try dishes based on beans, pulses, Quorn, tofu, nuts or soya meat alternatives.
Full fat dairy foods including milk, yogurt, cream and cheese.Lower fat milks such as semi-skimmed, 1% fat or skimmed milk, and calcium-fortified alternatives to milk. Low fat yogurts. Low fat cheese such as half fat cheddar and cottage cheese.
Cakes, and biscuits which are sweet, filled or coated.Plain buns such as currant or hot cross buns, scones, semi-sweet biscuits.
Crisps.Hummus and vegetable sticks.
Coconut – fresh, dried and desiccated.Dried fruit and nuts.
Cream or pastry-based desserts.Fresh, baked or poached fruit, milk puddings and custard made with low fat milk, low fat yogurts, and fruit crumbles made with unsaturated spread.
Pastry, sausage rolls, and savoury pies.Potato topped pies.
Cream-based curries e.g. kormas. Cheese and cream-based pasta dishes. Extra cheese or meat-topped pizzas, sandwiches with cheese fillings.
Cream-based soups and sauces.
Tomato and vegetable-based curries and pasta dishes. Thin crust pizzas with vegetable toppings, sandwich fillings such as hummus, lean chicken, egg salad and falafel. Vegetable and tomato based soups and sauces.
Roasting or frying with butter, lard, other animal fats or coconut oil.Use small amounts of vegetable oil or try other cooking methods such as making casseroles, boiling, grilling, steaming, roasting bags.
Milk chocolate, toffee, fudge, crisps and fried salty snacks.Dark chocolate, chewing gum, nuts, seeds, popcorn. Lower fat crisps or baked savoury snacks.
Creamy salad dressings such as ranch and Ceasar dressing, and mayonnaise.Salad dressings made with olive oil, rapeseed oil, a seed or nut oil, or low fat mayonnaise.

See more ideas for cutting down on saturated fats

Choosing oils for cooking at high temperatures 

When you are frying, roasting, grilling or barbecuing, the cooking temperature will be very high, so you need to choose oils that are stable at high temperatures and have a high 'smoke point'.

The smoke point is the temperature at which the oil starts to smoke, which is different for all oils. When an oil starts to smoke, the fat breaks down and harmful substances are produced. 

  • Choose rapeseed, sunflower and corn oils for cooking at high temperatures. Most oil sold as vegetable oil is rapeseed oil. Check the label to make sure. 
  • Avoid coconut oil, goose fat, lard, dripping and butter. 

Whichever cooking method you choose, use small amounts of oil as they are still high in calories. 

Repeat frying with a deep fat fryer can also lead to harmful substances and trans fats forming over time, so it's best to avoid deep frying. If you do, use the oil once and then throw it away.  

The composition of fats, oils and spreads

See the proportions of different types of fats that make up oils and spreads. 

 

Get ideas for healthy snacks that are low in saturated fats

 

Источник: https://www.heartuk.org.uk/

Healthy Butter Substitutes for Popcorn

A 5-cup serving of air-popped popcorn has just 155 calories with 1 gram of fat and nearly 6 grams of dietary fiber. Add just 1 tablespoon of butter and you’re increasing your snack’s calories by 102 and the fat by 12 grams. Most bagged and theater popcorn is loaded with butter or oil and contains excess calories and fat. Skip the butter and air-pop your popcorn on the stove top, in a paper bag in the microwave or in a specialty popper. Your popcorn won’t be flavorless -- you have plenty of fun flavoring options to substitute for butter.

Spices and Herbs

Sprinkling some dry spices on your popcorn instantly gives it a flavor boost, and there’s a wide variety of combinations to use. Cayenne pepper and paprika make a simple pairing that will awaken your taste buds with pleasant spice. Herbs such as ground sage or thyme make the popcorn taste earthy. Premixed blends such as lemon pepper, Italian herb blends and steak seasonings give popcorn a kick, too. Experiment by tossing a handful of popcorn with some seasonings to see if you like it. For sweeter popcorn, add ground cinnamon and nutmeg.

Citrus

Freshly squeezed citrus juice gives popcorn an eye-opening boost. Lemon, lime and orange work well, and so does grapefruit if you’re feeling adventurous. Citrus zest intensifies the flavor, but use it sparingly since it can make the popcorn bitter. To keep from making your popcorn soggy, drizzle the juice on in small increments while tossing the popcorn for even distribution. Alternately, toss citrus slices with the popcorn for an interesting presentation and a more subtle flavor.

Olive Oil

Quality olive oil has a rich taste and provides high amounts of heart-healthy fats. In 1 teaspoon of olive oil, you consume 40 calories and 3.2 grams of monounsaturated fat. Monounsaturated fat helps improve blood cholesterol levels. Toss olive oil with cooked popcorn or pop the popcorn in a small amount of olive oil for even flavor distribution. Olive oil pairs well with spices and herbs, helping them to stick to the popcorn.

Trail Mix

Adding trail mix ingredients to popcorn introduces a variety of flavors and can make your snack healthier. Peanuts, slivered almonds, carob pieces, soy nuts, dehydrated vegetables or dried, unsweetened fruit are good options. Keep in mind that trail mix ingredients do increase the calorie content, so use them sparingly. An ounce of trail mix with chocolate chips, unsalted nuts and seeds has 137 calories and 9 grams of heart-healthy fats. Grab just one or two pieces of the trail mix ingredients with every handful of popcorn for added flavor.

References

Writer Bio

Serena Styles is a Colorado-based writer who specializes in health, fitness and food. Speaking three languages and working on a fourth, Styles is pursuing a Bachelor's in Linguistics and preparing to travel the world. When Styles isn't writing, she can be found hiking, cooking or working as a certified nutritionist.

Источник: https://healthyeating.sfgate.com/healthy-butter-substitutes-popcorn-3881.html

Best Oil for Popcorn (10 Types of Popcorn Oil Reviewed)

No flavor reminds you better of the cinema experience than popcorn. The buttery, crunchy-soft, salty snack is synonymous with relaxation and a good time.

But sometimes going to the cinema is not a viable option, so, apart from finding a good movie to stream, you also have to find out the best way to cook popcorn and make it taste just like movie popcorn. And a great-quality oil is key for popcorn.

And, although nowadays there are lots of popcorn-preparing devices available (microwave or air-popped), as far as taste and texture are concerned, the best method is the traditional one, the stovetop.

Types of Oil for Popcorn

As a general rule, movie theatre popcorn doesn’t contain any butter at all. It is cooked in cooking oil and flavored with butter (that doesn’t mean that real butter is used).

Cooking the kernels in butter would weigh down the popcorn, making it soggy and greasy. Oil is better for cooking popcorn because it won’t make it mushy and keeps it from drying out during the cooking process.

Of course, depending on taste and preferences, any of the oil/fat versions mentioned below can be mixed for a stronger flavor or a crispier popcorn.

Usually for mixes, a flavorless oil with a high smoke point such, such as grapeseed oil, is combined with a fat with a low smoke point, such as butter, olive oil, bacon grease, or duck fat. The mixture will ensure that the popcorn is crunchy and that every kernel pops.

1. Coconut Oil

With a slow smoke point at 350F, coconut oil heats up just enough to make popcorn, but not so much as to become unhealthy. Coconut oil is one of the healthiest oils you can find, good for your heart and for helping you lose abdominal fat.

Viva Naturals Organic Extra Virgin Coconut Oil

Cold-pressed from organic coconuts, Viva Naturals Organic Extra Virgin Coconut Oil is full of flavor and packed with valuable nutrients. It can be used for many purposes, from cooking, baking, and spreading on toast to moisturizing hair and skin.

It has a great buttered popcorn smell, and cooks popcorn consistently, giving it a sweet undertone. Cooking popcorn in this coconut oil will result in crispy and well popped kernels.

It works well with salted, spiced, flavored, sweet/salty, and kettle corn popcorn. A little of this and crystal salt and you will be in heaven.

2. Olive Oil

The most common vegetable oil, with a smoke point at 350-400F, olive oil contains oleic acid and other monosaturated fats and antioxidants that are health-friendly.

It has a neutral flavor that works very well with popcorn, as it allows the flavors in the topping to become dominant, unlike other types of oil that lend their flavor to the kernels as they cook.

Bertolli Olive Oil, Extra Virgin Rich

An oil that adds omega-3 fatty acids to food, Bertolli Olive Oil is a cold press oil, meaning that it maintains most of the nutrients and the full-bodied taste of the olives.

It can be used for meat and fish marinades, soups and stews, sauces, dressings, and for cooking.

It has a neutral taste, which doesn’t alter the flavor of food, even when it is used for cooking or baking. For popcorn, the neutral flavor is preferable, as it won’t alter the taste of the kernels. One reviewer calls the Bertolli Olive Oil “the gold standard”.

3. Avocado Oil

Another oil with a high smoke point, between 375 and 400F, avocado oil comes with a lot of health benefits. It has healthy fats and it can remove harmful toxins.

The flavor is another thing that makes it perfect for cooking popcorn, as avocado oil has a very strong buttery flavor, which it lends to popcorn. However, the price is significantly higher than the price for other types of oils.

Chosen Foods 100% Pure Avocado Oil

The Chosen Foods Avocado Oil is 100% pure avocado oil made from naturally refined avocados and can be used for cooking, baking, dressings, and marinades. Because of its high smoke point, avocado oil is very versatile, as it locks in the flavor when cooked at high temperatures.

This is just what happens when cooking popcorn, as the high temperature will result in a nutty flavor, which is perfectly suited to the natural popcorn flavor.

You can also use it for making tacos, and chips grilled cheese, and that it has an excellent, not overwhelming flavor that “really adds to cooking”.

4. Sunflower Oil

Using sunflower oil to make popcorn is one of the simplest methods. The oil has a high smoke point, 440F. It is also perfect for preserving, as it doesn’t change its taste as fast as other types of oil.

While it doesn’t come with the same health benefits as other types of oil, it is perfect for cooking popcorn.

Baja Precious – High Oleic Sunflower Oil

A high-oleic organic sunflower oil, Baja Precious is all-natural sunflower oil. It is extracted by pressing the seeds of the sunflower, resulting in an oil that is high in monosaturated fat and low in saturated and polyunsaturated fats.

That’s why it is healthy for the heart, but also an effective butter substitute. It can be used for various culinary needs, and it has a high smoke point.

5. Canola Oil

The cheapest version available, canola oil is ideal for the health conscious. It has plenty of essential fatty acids and it is excellent for helping the body absorb necessary nutrients.

It also has a high smoke point of 435F, which makes it good for cooking popcorn. However, it has a distinctive flavor, which will transfer to the popcorn, and it is usually highly processed, ridding it of many nutrients.

Spectrum Organic Canola Oil

An oil with a neutral flavor, ideal for baking cakes, cookies, and pies, the Spectrum organic canola oil is perfect for cooking at medium or high heat, as it has a high smoke point.

The neutral flavor makes it a great product for those who dislike flavored oils, and it also has the advantage, that it leaves no aftertaste, unlike some other canola oils.

6. Grapeseed Oil

With a very high smoke point at 420F, grapeseed oil is recommended for making gourmet popcorn, which has its own, distinct flavor. Grapeseed oil has an almost neutral flavor, with a very subtle hint of a nutty taste.

Because of this very subtle taste, the oil can be combined with other types of fat or can be used for popcorn meant to be seasoned with special flavors.

Also, grapeseed oil is rich in Vitamin E and Omega-6 Fatty Acids and contains natural anti-oxidants.

Zatural Virgin Grapeseed Oil

Rich in Vitamin E, Omega 3, and 6, and able to withstand high-heat cooking, Zatural Virgin Grapeseed Oil is a wonderful alternative to other cooking oils, and it can also be used as a skin moisturizer.

It is a cold-pressed oil, it isn’t chemically extracted, with a very delicate fragrance that reminds you of grapes, naturally. Keep it in the fridge after opening, as it will keep fresh much longer.

The oil is suitable for cooking at very high temperatures, as it doesn’t smoke.

7. Peanut Oil

For those who are not allergic to nuts and enjoy the taste of peanuts, peanut oil is an excellent option for making popcorn packed with flavor.

It is not the healthiest option, because it has some saturated fats, which can be harmful. but it does contains a good quantity of vitamin E, a powerful antioxidant that helps repair damaged cells.

Native Harvest Peanut Oil

A high heat refined Native Harvest Peanut oil provides allergen-free monounsaturated fats, as well as antioxidants and vitamin E, and helps control cholesterol levels.

It has a nutty flavor that goes very well with popcorn and a high smoke point. Although it is mostly used for Asian and African food recipes, you can use it for frying all sorts of food, such as egg rolls.

8. Ghee

The clarified butter originating in ancient India has a strong butter flavor and lots of vitamins, besides Omega fatty acids. It is not the healthiest fat in which to cook popcorn, and it also has a low smoke point, making it suitable for mixing with other oils.

However, some people consider it well suited for cooking popcorn.

When making the ghee, you can push it a little further to darken the ghee and get a wonderful nutty flavor that goes well with popcorn.

Reddit

4th & Heart Original Grass-Fed Ghee

This is lactose-free Ghee cooked the old-fashioned way from milk from New Zealand. 4th & Heart Ghee is one of the best options if you’re not in the mood to make your own.

It can replace any butter, olive oil, or coconut oil, it is diet-friendly and doesn’t require refrigeration.

Many people recommend using it for making popcorn and say that it gives popcorn the same taste as that of movie popcorn but with only natural ingredients.

It smells like popcorn butter and it is perfect for cooking and flavoring.

9. Bacon Grease/ Lard

Bacon grease is used by old-school taste enthusiasts for making popcorn who swear by the strong bacon-like flavor. Some people consider that “there is nothing more decadent” than the taste of popcorn cooked in bacon grease.

They have used bacon fat with great results, making it a tradition in their family. For those who like popcorn with a strong flavor, the oil/fat “has surprisingly little impact on the flavor” and that the toppings are more important.

Fatworks USDA Premium Pasture Raised Pork Lard

A highly stable type of fat, lard has been used for years in traditional cooking. It is suitable for preserving cooked meat, which is what it was used for before refrigerators existed. It can be used for frying or in pie crusts, making the fried food crispier and the pie crust flakier. It also adds a mild savory flavor to foods, so it is ideal for popcorn.


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How to make stovetop popcorn

The ingredient list is pretty short, as all you need are popcorn kernels, oil, salt, and whatever you want as a topping, and a pot with a lid of course. It takes less than 10 minutes to make and is a certain crowd-pleaser. The pot should be a heavy-bottomed one, that disperses heat, so there are no hot spots to burn the popcorn.

The temperature should be medium heat, not too high, so that the oil doesn’t burn and affect the taste of the popcorn. To test the temperature of the oil, start with two popcorn kernels. When they pop, the oil is hot enough and you can put the rest in the pot. Once they are all in, put on the lid and remove the pot from the heat and let it sit for one minute.

After a minute, return it to the stove and continue to cook the kernels on medium heat. It’s better to tip the lid slightly when the kernels are popping as they release steam that can make the popcorn lose its crispness. Also, occasionally shake the pot to ensure they cook evenly. Once all the kernels have popped, season the popcorn with salt or a topping of your choice.

As for quantities, you will need 1/2 cup of oil to 1/3 cup of popcorn kernels. However, the topic that causes the most debate about stovetop popcorn recipes is the oil to popcorn ratio.

There are several traditional recommendations. The Fannie Farmer Cookbook says three tablespoons of oil to 1/2 cup popcorn kernels.

Irma Rombauer’s Joy of Cooking calls for less oil (one or two tablespoons). You can also give up the oil entirely and cook popcorn as Native Americans did, in a pot clay full of hot sand or, as Laura Ingalls Wilder did in These Happy Golden Years, using a cast-iron skillet lined with salt. However, one modern chef discovered that the best way to go is the total opposite of ditching oil.

Chef Jessica Koslow, owner and chef at Sqirl in Los Angeles, has developed a popcorn recipe in which she has doubled or tripled the amount of oil.

She then adds only dry seasoning to the extra-crisp popcorn to keep the crunch. In her own words, the extensive amount of oil gives the kernels an extra-crunchy exterior and “potato chip sturdiness.” Specifically, she recommends using 1/2 cup oil to 1/3 cup corn.

Types of seasoning/topping for popcorn

One thing everyone can agree on, though, is that for perfect popcorn, the kernels have to maintain a crunchy texture. Soggy popcorn is no good, no matter how well-seasoned it is. This is why only dry seasoning is recommended. If you’re looking for a buttery flavor, it is better to mix ghee or butter with another type of oil for cooking, not pour it over the top of cooked popcorn as this will moisten the kernels.

Also, grated cheeses, lemon zest, fresh herbs will all have the same effect. For gourmet popcorn, Chef Jessica Koslow uses “a mix of sweet, salty, sour, and umami”. For sweet caramel corn, she uses coconut sugar and turmeric. For a vegan “cheesy” topping, she recommends a mix of nutritional yeast, dried rosemary, and black pepper. Another mix is sweet and hot smoked paprika, and a little cumin.


Chef’s Pencil is reader-supported. If you buy something through our links, we may earn an affiliate commissionthough this not impact the product selection, which is done independently by our editors and contributors.

Corina Gruber

Corina is a content writer and blogger with a passion for food and traveling. With over 16 years of experience as a copywriter, content writer, and localization specialist, she has a knack for writing about entertainment and a passion for tech. A foodie and travel enthusiast, she likes to explore everything food-related int her travels and discover traditions and authentic products.

Источник: https://www.chefspencil.com/best-oil-for-popcorn/

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If you answered yes to that question, then you're my kind of people. You could probably down an entire large bag of popcorn during one 30-minute episode of Friends. You could probably even finish it in half the time if it’s slathered in cheddar cheesy goodness.

But, of course, that begs the question:

Is popcorn healthy?

Plain and simple, popcorn is a whole grain, just popped. “So while some people might look at it as a junk food, it’s not,” says Abby Langer, R.D., owner of Abby Langer Nutrition in Toronto, Canada. And obviously, whole grains are pretty damn healthy.

"It also has a lot of volume, so it can make and keep you full," says Langer. "And it’s satisfying, thanks to its crunch.”

But, Langer says, sometimes it’s just a vehicle for other flavors—and that’s where the good-for-you crunch can go bad. “The problem is that people just tend to overeat it," she says, noting that a serving is typically one cup. "And when you overeat Smartfood or kettlecorn, you’re probably taking in more calories than expected.”

Popcorn nutrition: not too shabby

Ah, the stats that tell all. First things first, a plain ol' bag of popcorn won’t pop your calorie quota—or any other nutritional quota for that matter.

.

At 31 calories, 1 gram of fiber, and 1 gram of protein per cup of plain, per the USDA, air-popped popcorn is a solid choice, nutritionally speaking.

“It not only has a lot of fiber, but when it’s popped with very little fat, it’s quite low-calorie, as well," says Langer.

So even if you down three cups (so easy and pretty typical of me, tbh!), it’s less than 100 calories—without going overboard on carbs, sodium, or fat.

Of course, these numbers quickly change once you add in butter, cheese, caramel, or any other popular popcorn topping.

One cup of popcorn can have anywhere from 31 to 172 calories—depending on which type you get.

Three cups of buttered popcorn, for example, will net you 192 calories (twice that of an equivalent serving of plain popcorn) and 15 grams of fat (five times as much as the plain stuff).

“If you’re not going to limit yourself to a serving," Langer says (and who does when it comes to popcorn, honestly), "then you really have to pay attention to the label and think about what you’re going to realistically consume."

What about microwave popcorn?

It’s probably best to skip those microwave bags, Langer says. Some brands have lots of trans fats or high amounts of saturated fat (beware that butter!).

She also adds that there is a slight risk of getting "popcorn lung"—a type of lung disease associated with diacetyl (a chemical used in artificial butter flavoring on popcorn). TBH, that's really only a risk if you're constantly inhaling the fumes from your bag of freshly-popped popcorn, though. (So...don't do that).

Microwave Popcorn Popper

BUY IT

If you want to play it safe, Langer suggests just throwing some kernels in a brown paper bag and popping them yourself in the microwave. You could also use an air popper, like this one from Amazon that's BPA-free, dishwasher-safe, and only $15.

Another option if you're willing to get your hands dirty: Cook popcorn on the stovetop. Using a little coconut or olive oil, heat the oil in a deep pan, and add three kernels. When all three pop, add the rest and shake periodically. Then, add just a hint of parmesan cheese, salt and vinegar, a little hot sauce, or some of your favorite dried herbs and spices. The oil will add some extra calories and fat compared to just a plain, air-popped cup, but this method still makes for healthy (and delicious) popcorn.

The bottom line: Popcorn is a pretty damn healthy snack, as long as you're keeping it plain or adding just a hint of flavor. But don’t go all-in on that full bag of movie theater popcorn.

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Источник: https://www.womenshealthmag.com/food/a20976724/is-popcorn-healthy/

This is a common debate among the health conscious foodies and food experts. Sunflower oil and olive oil have both been praised for their nutritional values and health benefits. But if they are compared with each other, which one is better?

Sunflower Oil Vs Olive Oil

Let’s compare both the sunflower oil vs olive oil to knowwhich one is better for our health:

Fat:

Both the oils are plant based and contain roughly 120 calories per tablespoon. Both are rich in polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats. These kinds of fatty acids are known to bring down the bad cholesterol in your blood while promoting good cholesterol.

  • Linoleic Acid In Sunflower Oil:Sunflower oil contains almost 65% linoleic acid while olive oil contains just 10% of it. It also contains omega 3 fatty acids and omega 6 fatty acids, which enhance neurological functions and reduce inflammation.
  • Oleic Acid In Olive Oil:Oleic acid is a monounsaturated fatty acid, which is known to suppress oncogene in the body. So, the next time you add olive oil to your Caesar salad, remember, you are fighting cancer as well! The oleic acid has been shown to protect cells from toxins released by carcinogens as well. It also reduces the amount of carcinogens formed in meats when they are cooked.

[ Read: Benefits Of Sunflower Oil For Health ]

Vitamin E:

Vitamin E should be taken in healthy doses every day because of its various benefits. It reduces formation of free radicals, which can lead to the development of certain types of cancer or chronic diseases. Vitamin E also prevents vascular complications like arteriosclerosis, chest pain, leg pain due to arterial blockage etc. It also alleviates diabetes and its symptoms. Vitamin E is used for asthma, skin disorders, cataracts etc.

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  • Sunflower oil:It is a rich source of vitamin E. It has been found that vitamin E found in sunflower oil can also prevent rheumatoid arthritis and colon cancer. People from countries that use olive oil and sunflower oil as their main cooking oils are found to have lower asthma rates.
  • Olive oil: It also contains a good proportion of Vitamin E. The vitamin E found in other oils like canola, corn or soyabean are found in the gamma-tocopherol form, which has a negative impact on lung function. But olive oil and sunflower oil both contain vitamin E in the alpha-tocopherol form which has no such adverse effect.

Vitamin K:

Vitamin K is another important nutrient that provides various health benefits. It serves as an important factor in the blood clotting mechanism and stops excessive bleeding. It also strengthens the bones and can prevent osteoporosis in older women.

  • Sunflower Oil:
    It has barely 1 microgram of vitamin K per tablespoon.
  • Olive Oil:
  • It contains more than 8 micrograms of Vitamin K per tablespoon.

[ Read: Vitamin K Deficiency diseases & treatment ]

Minerals:

Plant oils contain fewer mineral oils than those obtained from animal sources. Here is a comparison between the mineral content in sunflower oil and olive oil

  • Sunflower Oil:
     Being a vegetable oil, it does not offer minerals at all.
  • Olive Oil: Olive oil is a fruit oil and has several minerals, although in trace amounts. It contains:
  • Iron which is an important component of hemoglobin, the oxygen carrier in your blood.
  • Potassium, which maintains muscle tone and heart health.
  • Sodium, which has functions similar to potassium
  • Calcium, which is good for bone and teeth.

[ Read: Benefits Of Extra Virgin Olive Oil For Health ]

Verdict: Olive Oil Is Better!

From the above comparison, it is clear that olive is popcorn cooked in olive oil good for you is healthier than sunflower oil in terms of Vitamin K content, fatty acids and minerals. Olive oil does not interfere with the omega 6 fatty acid and omega 3 fatty acid balance, whereas sunflower oil may increase the ratio of these fatty acids. The polyunsaturated fats in sunflower oil can make it go rancid more easily than olive oil. Olive oil also has a fruity taste unlike sunflower oil, which is bland.

So, the next time you go shopping for cooking oil, make sure you make the right choice!

What oil do you use for cooking? Have you tried olive oil? Share your views with us in the comments section below.

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Источник: https://www.stylecraze.com/articles/sunflower-oil-vs-olive-oil-better/

Jump to Recipe Print Recipe

This Homemade Stovetop Popcorn Recipe is only 43 calories per cup, and easy to make!

In this article, you’ll learn how to make popcorn on the stove low-calorie, and healthy. This healthy popcorn recipe only calls for three ingredients, making popcorn on the stove has never been so easy…

Homemade Stovetop Popcorn Recipe

Below, you will learn how to make popcorn on stove. We’ve made this popcorn stove top recipe as easy as possible, with a shopping list, printable recipe card, nutrition label, and more. Now you can make stove popcorn easily, with minimal cleanup.

The best popcorn recipes, are often compared to air popped popcorn. But I like making stovetop popcorn recipes because they pop in the oil, making distribution easier and more even.

This homemade stovetop popcorn recipe is only 43 calories per cup!

Homemade Stovetop Popcorn Recipe

This recipe for stovetop popcorn will supply you with everything you need to make homemade popcorn on the stove.

From a printable recipe card for pop corn, to a shopping list that you can screenshot on your phone. This popped corn recipes article will supply you with everything you need for popping popcorn. is popcorn cooked in olive oil good for you width="1000" height="1000" src="https://loseweightbyeating.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/71xE7KlB1DL._SL1000_.jpg" alt="homemade stovetop popcorn recipe">

Bellow, you’ll learn how to cook popcorn journey to the west tamil dubbed movie the stove, and find the best popping corn kernels.

What You’ll Find in this Article:

  • Stovetop Popcorn Ingredients (shopping list!)
  • How to Make Popcorn on Stove Top
  • Homemade Stovetop Popcorn Recipe (recipe card!)
  • Nutrition and Calories in Stovetop Popcorn

Making popcorn on the stove has never been so easy… You’ll want to make this homemade stovetop popcorn recipe every night, and it’s so easy, you can!

In the next section, you’ll find a shopping list for homemade stovetop popcorn with oil.

Up next, you’ll find the shopping list for homemade stovetop popcorn recipe…

Stovetop Popcorn Ingredients

We’ve made these recipes for popcorn low in calories, without sacrificing flavor. We do that with the help of healthy coconut oil. However, you can just as easily make this stovetop popcorn recipe with olive oil.

This healthy popcorn recipe only calls for three ingredients! You may already have all of the ingredients to make homemade popcorn on the stove in your pantry already!

Homemade Stovetop Popcorn Recipe

I recommend taking a screenshot of the shopping list below. This way you have it on your phone the next time you go shopping.

Shopping List for Homemade Popcorn:

Special Tip: You can find all of the measurements for this homemade stovetop popcorn recipe in the recipe card below. There, you can choose how much healthy popcorn you want to make, and it will do all of the measurement math for you!

In the next section, you will learn how to pop popcorn on the stove. And further down, you will find a printable recipe card for this pop corn recipe.

Up next, you’ll learn how to make popcorn on the stove top.

How to Make Popcorn on Stove Top

Now that you’ve got all of the ingredients for your homemade popcorn recipe, let’s move on and pop the popcorn…

In this section, you will learn how to make popcorn on the stove top, with the help of this handy “how to guide”.

homemade stovetop popcorn recipe

Here, you will learn how to make stovetop popcorn in a flash… You can also find directions on pop corn popping in the recipe card below.

How to Make Popcorn on the Stove:

  1. In a large, heavy-bottomed saucepan or dutch oven over medium heat, combine the coconut oil and 2 popcorn kernels. Cover the pot and wait for the kernels to pop, this may take a few minutes…
  2. Once the 2 kernels pop, turn off the popular community bank manhattan, remove the pot from the burner and pour in the remaining popcorn kernels.
  3. Cover the pot again, and give the pot a little shake to evenly layer the kernels. Let the pot rest for 1 minute to lightly cool the oil. Then turn the heat back up to medium heat and put the pot back onto the burner.
  4. Cook the popcorn, gently shaking it back and forth to cook the kernels evenly. Once the kernels start popping, vent the lid slightly to release steam.
  5. Continue cooking until the popping sound slows to about one pop per every few seconds.
  6. Remove the lid and pour the popcorn into your serving bowl. Sprinkle with salt and serve hot.

Special Tip: In the next section, you will find a shareable recipe card. There, you will find the how to guide, measurements and ingredients, even nutrition for this stove popcorn recipe.

This low calorie, healthy popcorn on the stove recipe will quickly become one of your favorite snacks. Be sure to see more low-calorie healthy snack recipes in the “what to read next” section below.

Up next, you will find a shareable recipe card that you can pin to your Pinterest boards, and email to yourself and friends.

Homemade Stovetop Popcorn Recipe

This easy homemade stovetop popcorn recipe is only 43 calories!

Making popped corn recipes has never been easier… If you clicked on the jump to recipe button, you may have skipped past the how-to guide, and the shopping list. Should you desire to review either of those sections, simply scroll up.

In the next section, you will find a nutrition label for this homemade popcorn recipe. And below that, more low-calorie recipes for snacking and indulging.

Homemade Stovetop Popcorn Recipe

Homemade Stovetop Popcorn Recipe

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This homemade stovetop popcorn recipe is easy and yummy!We use coconut oil as it won't burn like butter, but you can use olive oil in its place if you desire. Learn ho sto make popcorn on stove top with this easy to follow, low calorie recipe.

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  • In a large, heavy-bottomed saucepan or dutch oven over medium heat, combine the coconut oil and 2 popcorn kernels. Cover the pot and wait for the kernels to pop, this may take a few minutes…

  • Once the 2 kernels pop, turn off the heat, remove the pot from the burner and pour in the remaining popcorn kernels.

  • Cover the pot again, and give the pot a little shake to evenly layer the kernels. Let the pot rest for 1 minute to lightly cool the oil. Then turn the heat back up to medium heat and put the pot back onto the burner.

  • Cook the popcorn, gently shaking it back and forth to cook the kernels evenly. Once the kernels start popping, vent the lid slightly to release steam.

  • Continue cooking until the popping sound slows to about one pop per every few seconds.

  • Remove the lid and pour the popcorn into your serving bowl. Sprinkle with salt and serve hot.

homemade stovetop popcorn recipe

Serving: 1cupCalories: 43kcalCarbohydrates: 1.3gProtein: 0.1gFat: 4.3gSaturated Fat: 3.5gCholesterol: 0mgSodium: is popcorn cooked in olive oil good for you 0mgFiber: 0.2gSugar: 0gCalcium: 0mgIron: 0mg

Let us know how it was!

Up next… Nutrition and calories in stovetop popcorn recipes.

Nutrition and Calories in Stovetop Popcorn

Not all stove popcorn is made the same, our low calorie recipe for popcorn on stove is just 43 calories per cup!

Be sure to check the next section for more low-calorie recipes like this healthy popcorn recipe made on the stove…

homemade stovetop popcorn recipe

What to Read Next:

Lose Weight By Eating Cookbooks

Homemade Stovetop Popcorn Recipe

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Источник: https://loseweightbyeating.com/homemade-stovetop-popcorn-recipe/

A classic favorite, the health benefits of popcorn may surprise you. It’s higher in antioxidants than many fruits and vegetables, it’s a good source of fiber and it’s is popcorn cooked in olive oil good for you whole grain. What more can you want from America’s favorite snack?

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On the flipside, popcorn is often coated with butter, salt, sugar and hidden chemicals. Even when you avoid the obvious dietary pitfalls and empty calories, there are questions that arise about the best, healthiest ways to cook and prepare it.

We asked registered dietitian Laura Jeffers, MEd, RD, LD nine tips to help you make the most of this crunchy treat:

1. Make popcorn on the stovetop

Air popped popcorn uses no oil, meaning it is popcorn cooked in olive oil good for you the fewest calories.

“Popping it in oil, however, is a great way to consume a healthy portion of fat to control hunger,” Jeffers says.

Not only can you manage serving size, but you can also make it in under 10 minutes in most cases. All you need is a pot, lid and oil and you’ll be on your way to making healthy popcorn.

2. Use walnut, avocado or extra virgin olive oils

Walnut, avocado or extra virgin olive oils are best when making popcorn on the stovetop. Canola oil is the next best option. Flaxseed and wheat germ oil shouldn’t be heated, so they don’t really work for popping popcorn. Use palm and coconut oils sparingly because of their high saturated fat content and avoid corn, sunflower and soybean oils altogether.

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3. Manage portion sizes

A serving size depends on the type of popcorn you are eating, but for reference, one cup of plain popcorn is about 30 calories. Be cautious because once you start adding toppings, the calorie count goes up pretty quickly.

4. Avoid microwave popcorn

In general, microwave popcorn is the least healthy option. It often contains a lot of salt, the flavorings are artificial and people tend to eat too much because of the large portion size of most bags.

5. Avoid butter — or use it sparingly

Buttered popcorn is a fan favorite but unfortunately comes with hidden chemicals and calories.

If you feel like you must have it, use 2 to 3 teaspoons and gradually cut it out altogether. When you purchase buttered or extra buttered popcorn at a movie theater, a chemical is added to the food. If you add extra butter, you are getting at least one and a half times the normal butter serving. But, if you are eating movie theater popcorn and adding butter, the damage is probably already done.

“If it is a very infrequent treat and you order a small size, I don’t think it makes that much of a difference,” Jeffers says.

6. Limit kettle corn

Kettle corn is usually mixed with refined sugar, salt and oil and is a slightly less nutritious option because it increases calories and salt intake. Most people should only get 2,300 mg of sodium each day, which is about one teaspoon. When kettle corn is prepackaged, it’s even harder to control the sodium and calories. It’s best to opt for low-sodium versions when possible, Jeffers says.

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7. Beware of added sweeteners and chemicals

Avoid purchasing popcorn that is anything more than your basic popped kernel because with each thing added, the food becomes less healthy. Although we crave sweets at times, beware of sweet popcorn because it comes from artificial sweeteners.

“View prepackaged varieties like caramel or dark chocolate as a treat, not a healthy snack,” Jeffers says.

Be aware that things like truffle oil and cheese powders aren’t usually made from truffles or cheese, but from chemical and artificial flavorings. Make sure to read labels whenever you’re at the grocery store to really understand what ingredients are in the box.

8. Add healthier, lighter toppings

Spice up your popcorn in a healthy way by adding hot sauce or melt a couple of ounces of cheese on your popcorn. You also can try a sprinkle of balsamic vinegar or eat your popcorn with pickles or jalapeño peppers. Make sure to add spices and seasonings and not powders, flavorings or a lot of salt.

9. Add protein

One way to keep popcorn servings under control and make you feel fuller longer is to pair it with a protein. Try eating it with a tablespoon of peanut butter, 2 ounces of cheese (as long as you didn’t top the popcorn with cheese already) or another protein source you like. You’ll be on central trust bank near me way to eating a nutritious snack in no time!

Источник: https://health.clevelandclinic.org/9-best-tips-help-make-healthier-popcorn/

Best Oil for Popcorn (10 Types of Popcorn Oil Reviewed)

No flavor reminds you better of the cinema experience than popcorn. The buttery, crunchy-soft, salty snack is synonymous with relaxation and a good time.

But sometimes going to the cinema is not a viable option, so, apart from finding a good movie to stream, you also have to find out the best way to cook popcorn and make it taste just like movie popcorn. And a great-quality oil is key for popcorn.

And, although nowadays there are lots of popcorn-preparing devices available (microwave or air-popped), as far as taste and texture are concerned, the best method is the traditional one, the stovetop.

Types of Oil for Popcorn

As a general rule, movie theatre popcorn doesn’t contain any butter at all. It is cooked in cooking oil and flavored with butter (that doesn’t mean that real butter is used).

Cooking the kernels in butter would weigh down the popcorn, making it soggy and greasy. Oil is better for cooking popcorn because it won’t make it mushy and keeps it from drying is popcorn cooked in olive oil good for you during the cooking process.

Of course, depending on taste and preferences, any of the oil/fat versions mentioned below can be mixed for a stronger flavor or a crispier popcorn.

Usually for mixes, a flavorless oil with a high smoke point such, such as grapeseed oil, is combined with a fat with a low smoke point, such as butter, olive oil, bacon grease, or duck fat. The mixture will ensure that the popcorn is crunchy and that every kernel pops.

1. Coconut Oil

With a slow smoke point at 350F, coconut oil heats up just enough to make popcorn, but not so much as to become unhealthy. Coconut oil is one of the healthiest oils you can find, good for your heart and for helping you lose abdominal fat.

Viva Naturals Organic Extra Virgin Coconut Oil

Cold-pressed from organic coconuts, Viva Naturals Organic Extra Virgin Coconut Oil is full of flavor and packed with valuable nutrients. It can be used for many purposes, from cooking, baking, and spreading on toast to moisturizing hair and skin.

It has a great buttered popcorn smell, and cooks popcorn consistently, giving it a sweet undertone. Cooking popcorn in this coconut oil will result in crispy and well popped kernels.

It works well with salted, spiced, flavored, sweet/salty, and kettle corn popcorn. A little of this and crystal salt and you will be in heaven.

2. Olive Oil

The most common vegetable oil, with a smoke point at 350-400F, olive oil contains oleic acid and other monosaturated fats and antioxidants that are health-friendly.

It has a neutral flavor that works very well with popcorn, as it allows the flavors in the topping to become dominant, unlike other types of oil that lend their flavor to the kernels as they cook.

Bertolli Olive Oil, Extra Virgin Rich

An oil that adds omega-3 fatty acids to food, Bertolli Olive Oil is a cold press oil, meaning that it maintains most of the nutrients and the full-bodied taste of the olives.

It can be used for meat and fish marinades, soups and stews, sauces, dressings, and for cooking.

It has a neutral taste, which doesn’t alter the flavor of food, even when it is used for cooking or baking. For popcorn, the neutral flavor is preferable, as it won’t alter the taste of the kernels. One reviewer calls the Bertolli Olive Oil “the gold standard”.

3. Avocado Oil

Another oil with a high smoke point, between 375 and 400F, avocado oil comes with a lot of health benefits. It has healthy fats and it can remove harmful toxins.

The flavor is another thing that makes it perfect for cooking popcorn, as avocado oil has a very strong buttery flavor, which it is popcorn cooked in olive oil good for you to popcorn. However, the price is significantly higher than the price for other types of oils.

Chosen Foods 100% Pure Avocado Oil

The Chosen Foods Avocado Oil is 100% pure avocado oil made from naturally refined avocados and can be used for cooking, baking, dressings, and marinades. Because of its high smoke point, avocado oil is very versatile, as it locks in the flavor when cooked at high temperatures.

This is just what happens when cooking popcorn, as the high temperature will result in a nutty flavor, which is perfectly suited to the natural popcorn flavor.

You can also use it for making tacos, and chips grilled cheese, and that it has an excellent, not overwhelming flavor that “really adds to cooking”.

4. Sunflower Oil

Using sunflower oil to make popcorn is one of pay my sdge bill online simplest methods. The oil has a high smoke point, 440F. It is also perfect for preserving, as it doesn’t change its taste as fast as other types of oil.

While it doesn’t come with the same health benefits as other types of oil, it is perfect for cooking popcorn.

Baja Precious – High Oleic Sunflower Oil

A high-oleic organic sunflower oil, Baja Precious is all-natural sunflower oil. It is extracted by pressing the seeds of the sunflower, resulting in an oil that is high in monosaturated fat and low in saturated and polyunsaturated fats. is popcorn cooked in olive oil good for you why it is healthy for the heart, but also an effective butter substitute. It can be used for various culinary needs, and it has a high smoke point.

5. Canola Oil

The cheapest version available, canola oil is ideal for the health conscious. It has plenty of essential fatty acids and it is excellent for helping the body absorb necessary nutrients.

It also has a high smoke point of 435F, which makes it good for cooking popcorn. However, it has a distinctive flavor, which will transfer to the popcorn, and it is usually highly processed, ridding it of many nutrients.

Spectrum Organic Canola Oil

An oil with a neutral flavor, ideal for baking cakes, cookies, and pies, the Spectrum organic canola oil is perfect for cooking at medium or high heat, as it has a high smoke point.

The neutral flavor makes it a great product for those who dislike flavored oils, and it also has the advantage, that it leaves no aftertaste, unlike some other canola oils.

6. Grapeseed Oil

With a very high smoke point at 420F, grapeseed oil is recommended for making gourmet popcorn, which has its own, distinct flavor. Grapeseed oil has an almost neutral flavor, with a very subtle hint of a nutty taste.

Because of this very subtle taste, the oil can be combined with other types of fat or can be used for popcorn meant to be seasoned with special flavors.

Also, grapeseed oil is rich in Vitamin E and Omega-6 Fatty Acids and contains natural anti-oxidants.

Zatural Virgin Grapeseed Oil

Rich in Vitamin E, Omega 3, and 6, and able to withstand high-heat cooking, Zatural Virgin Grapeseed Oil is a wonderful alternative to other cooking oils, and it can also be used as a skin moisturizer.

It is a cold-pressed oil, it isn’t chemically extracted, with a very delicate fragrance that reminds you of grapes, naturally. Keep it in the fridge after opening, as it will keep fresh much longer.

The oil is suitable for cooking at very high temperatures, as it doesn’t smoke.

7. Peanut Oil

For those who are not allergic to nuts and enjoy the taste of peanuts, peanut oil is an excellent option for making popcorn packed with flavor.

It is not the healthiest option, because it has some saturated fats, which can be harmful. but it does contains a good quantity of vitamin E, a powerful antioxidant that helps repair damaged cells.

Native Harvest Peanut Oil

A high heat refined Native Harvest Peanut oil provides allergen-free monounsaturated fats, as well as antioxidants and vitamin E, and helps control cholesterol levels.

It has a nutty flavor that goes very well with popcorn and a high smoke point. Although it is mostly used for Asian and African food recipes, you can use it for frying all sorts of food, such as egg rolls.

8. Ghee

The clarified butter originating in ancient India has a strong butter flavor and lots of vitamins, besides Omega fatty acids. It is not the healthiest fat in which to cook popcorn, and it also has a low smoke point, making it suitable for mixing with other oils.

However, some people consider it well suited for cooking popcorn.

When making the ghee, you can push it a little further to darken the ghee and get a wonderful nutty flavor that goes well with popcorn.

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4th & Heart Original Grass-Fed Ghee

This is lactose-free Ghee cooked the old-fashioned way from milk from New Zealand. 4th & Heart Ghee is one of the best options if you’re not in the mood to make your own.

It can replace any butter, olive oil, or coconut oil, it is diet-friendly and doesn’t require refrigeration.

Many people recommend using it for making popcorn and say that it gives popcorn the same taste as that of movie popcorn but with only natural ingredients.

It smells like popcorn butter and it is perfect for cooking and flavoring.

9. Bacon Grease/ Lard

Bacon grease is used by old-school taste enthusiasts for making popcorn who swear by the strong bacon-like flavor. Some people consider that “there is nothing more decadent” than the taste of popcorn cooked in bacon grease.

They have used bacon fat with great results, making it a tradition in their family. For those who like popcorn with a strong flavor, the oil/fat “has surprisingly little impact on the flavor” and that the toppings are more important.

Fatworks USDA Premium Pasture Raised Pork Lard

A highly stable type of fat, lard has been used for years in traditional cooking. It is suitable for preserving cooked meat, which is what it was used for before refrigerators existed. It can be used for frying or in pie crusts, making the fried food crispier and the pie crust flakier. It also adds a mild savory flavor to foods, so it is ideal for popcorn.


Chef’s Pencil is reader-supported. If you buy something through our links, we may earn an affiliate commissionthough this not impact the product selection, which is done is popcorn cooked in olive oil good for you by our editors and contributors.

How to make stovetop popcorn

The ingredient list is pretty short, as all you need are popcorn kernels, oil, salt, and whatever you want as a topping, and a pot with a lid of course. It takes less than 10 minutes to make and is a certain crowd-pleaser. The pot should be a heavy-bottomed one, that disperses heat, so there are no hot spots to burn the popcorn.

The temperature should be medium heat, not too high, so that the oil doesn’t burn and affect the taste of the popcorn. To test the temperature of the oil, start with two popcorn kernels. When they pop, the oil is hot enough and you can put the rest in the pot. Once they are all in, put on the lid and remove the pot from the heat and let it sit for one minute.

After a minute, return it to the stove and continue to cook the kernels on medium heat. It’s better to tip the lid slightly when the kernels are popping as they release steam that can make the popcorn lose its crispness. Also, occasionally shake the pot to ensure they cook evenly. Once all the kernels have popped, season the popcorn with salt or a topping of your choice.

As for quantities, you will need 1/2 cup of oil to 1/3 cup of popcorn kernels. However, the topic that causes the most debate about stovetop popcorn recipes is the oil to popcorn ratio.

There are several traditional recommendations. The Fannie Farmer Cookbook says three tablespoons of oil to 1/2 cup popcorn kernels.

Irma Rombauer’s Joy of Cooking calls for less oil (one or two tablespoons). You can also give up the oil entirely and cook popcorn as Native Americans did, in a pot clay full of hot sand or, as Laura Ingalls Wilder did in These Happy Golden Years, using a cast-iron skillet lined with salt. However, one modern chef discovered that the best way to go is the total opposite of ditching oil.

Chef Jessica Koslow, owner and chef at Sqirl in Los Angeles, has developed a popcorn recipe in which she has doubled or tripled the amount of oil.

She then adds only dry seasoning to the extra-crisp popcorn to keep the crunch. In her own words, the extensive amount of oil gives the kernels an extra-crunchy exterior and “potato chip sturdiness.” Specifically, she recommends using 1/2 cup oil to 1/3 cup corn.

Types of seasoning/topping for popcorn

One thing everyone can agree on, though, is that for perfect popcorn, the kernels have to maintain a crunchy texture. Soggy popcorn is no good, no matter how well-seasoned it is. This is why only dry seasoning is recommended. If you’re looking for a buttery flavor, it is better to mix ghee or butter with another type of oil for cooking, not pour it over the top of cooked popcorn as this will moisten the kernels.

Also, grated cheeses, lemon zest, fresh herbs will all have the same effect. For gourmet popcorn, Chef Jessica Koslow uses “a mix of sweet, salty, sour, and umami”. For sweet caramel corn, she uses coconut sugar and turmeric. For a vegan “cheesy” topping, she recommends a mix of nutritional yeast, dried rosemary, and black pepper. Another mix is sweet and hot smoked paprika, and a little cumin.


Chef’s Pencil is reader-supported. If you buy something through our links, we may earn an affiliate commissionthough this not impact the product selection, which is done independently by our editors and contributors.

Corina Gruber

Corina is a content writer and blogger with a passion for food and traveling. With over 16 years of experience as a copywriter, content writer, and localization specialist, she has a knack for writing about entertainment and a passion for tech. A foodie and travel enthusiast, she likes to explore everything food-related int her travels and discover traditions and authentic products.

Источник: https://www.chefspencil.com/best-oil-for-popcorn/

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We haven’t been able to go to the movies for the past 6 months, so popcorn may have dropped off your radar. This week, we want remind you about the benefits of popcorn as a fun, healthy snack and talk about how to make your own at home. Note: this is NOT the extra-large tub of movie theater popcorn with extra “butter” (pumped out of a machine&hellip.ick!) and salt.

As an unprocessed whole grain, popcorn high in indigestible fiber. One 3-cup serving contains 3 grams of fiber, which is pretty good for a snack. Fiber helps with digestion and feeds your microbiome – the “good bacteria” in your gut will produce beneficial compounds if you give them lots of fiber. Those little hulls that catch in your teeth? They’ve got beta-carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin for your eyes, as well as polyphenols. If you make your own at home, popcorn is very low in fat and calories. Avoid packaged popcorn, which is not only expensive, but contains added oil and salt (and you don’t control the amount).

You might have heard that people with a digestive condition called diverticular disease can’t eat popcorn. This is a condition in which the walls of the gut have small pockets, or outpouchings. For years, it was thought that eating popcorn was bad because the indigestible fiber would catch in those pouches, causing inflammation (diverticulitis). However, that thinking has since changed and we now know that high-fiber foods such as popcorn do not trigger diverticulitis attacks. Of course, if your doctor has advised you not to eat popcorn, please follow that guidance.

Then, there’s the corn and GMO (genetically modified organisms) question. GM means that the organism (the plant) has had its genetic material changed in a way that does not occur naturally, such as to insert a gene that makes the plan more resistant to plant diseases or more able to survive when herbicides are applied. Upwards of 80% of field corn and sweet corn grown in the US has been genetically modified. People feel strongly about the potential health effects of GM foods on both sides.

The good news, if you are concerned about GMO? Popcorn is a distinct type of corn from field and sweet corn and has not been genetically modified. Any kind of popcorn you buy that was grown in the US – organic or not – is non-GMO. Most of the popcorn eaten throughout the world is grown in the US. However, you may still want to buy organic popcorn to avoid exposure to pesticides. Remember that by USDA standards, organic food cannot be genetically modified.

How to Pop Popcorn at Home (Hint: it’s so easy you don’t need a real “recipe”)

You’ve got options: here are a couple.

1) Go old school and use a pot on the stove. You need a heavy-bottomed pot (with a lid!) to heat evenly and avoid burning your popcorn. Pour enough oil to cover the bottom of the pot and warm it over medium-high heat. What type of oil? You have options here too. Popcorn starts popping at 180oC (356oF). Too hot, and you’ll burn your popcorn; but heat too slowly and the steam will escape from the tip of the kernels and they won’t actually pop.
Remember that oils have something called a “smoke point” – the temperature at which, when heated, they produce smoke. For most common oils, this is higher than 350oF, so you’re fine with any neutral oil such as canola, sunflower, avocado, grapeseed, or – our favorite for health reasons – olive oil. Olive oil has been shown to be stable at high temperatures. Stove-top popcorn is easy and quick, but requires attention. Stay close to your pot and adjust the heat as needed. If you’re concerned about GMOs, buy organic oil.
Add a couple of “test” kernels, cover the pot, and wait until they pop. Then add enough kernels to cover the bottom of the pot in an even layer. Cover the pot and remove from the heat for about 30 seconds. Return to heat and shake the pot gently as corn pops. Leave the lid open a crack to allow steam to escape; otherwise your popcorn will steam in the pot and won’t be as crisp.
Once popping slows to about 2 seconds between pops, remove from heat, open the lid away from your face, and pour into serving bowl. Sprinkle on any toppings right after popping, as the steam is still being released and the small amount of moisture will help the stick.

2) If you want a fun new kitchen gadget and don’t want to fire up the stove, another option is a collapsible silicone popcorn popper that you use in the microwave. You can put a little oil in the bottom (or not), add the kernels (capacity varies), and adjust the time based on your microwave’s power. It may take you a couple of tries to get the time just right. Don’t leave it in too long, or it will burn! There is no evidence that microwaving food is unsafe (as long as you use containers intended for microwaving, and are careful to avoid burns from steam). But, if you are not comfortable with it, go for option 1.

Topping suggestions (optional) – Just watch the salt.
• Brewer’s yeast
• Dried herbs
• Sprinkle of grated cheese (suggest a hard cheese like Parmesan)
• Salt (if not on a low-sodium diet)
What toppings do you like on popcorn? Share your faves on our Facebook group.

So, this Saturday night: cue up a movie on Netflix, fire up the stove with the biggest pan you can find us bank business checking account the microwave), and enjoy a guilt-free, microbiome-friendly movie experience.

https://www.pcf.org/blog/popcorn-friend-or-foe/

Источник: https://www.pcf.org/blog/popcorn-friend-or-foe/

Healthy Microwave Popcorn

Is popcorn good for you? It makes a great healthy snack! Here’s how to make healthy microwave popcorn with just popcorn kernels and a paper lunch sack! A whole grain snack for older kids and adults and you can flavor it any way you want to!

Healthy Microwave Popcorn in a paper lunch sack

*Originally published 3/2013. Updated 4/2020*

Hi Friends!

I wanted to share this healthy microwave popcorn with you guys because it’s such a great snack option for older kids and adults. It’s important to note that popcorn is a choking hazard for younger kids, but my five-year-old and I have been enjoying it together lately. Let’s chat a little bit about popcorn:

Is Popcorn Healthy?

Yes! It can be. Did you know popcorn is a whole grain? It’s a great source of fiber and also contains several B vitamins and other nutrients like iron, magnesium and phosphorus.

microwave popcorn in a brown paper lunch sack

Is popcorn a healthy snack?

For many years now, popcorn has been one of my favorite after-dinner snacks. I typically just eat it plain, but you can easily add whatever flavors you want after it’s popped. If you’re looking for a way to use up some of your popcorn, I’d definitely suggest my Sweet & Spicy Popcorn Snack Mix. Or for some flavored options, try this Spicy Ranch Popcorn or make up your own seasoning combo – try some nutritional yeast or cinnamon with a sprinkle of sugar. 

Is microwave popcorn bad for you?

While there’s nothing wrong with enjoying a bag of store-bought popcorn every once and a while, I want to show you guys just how easy it is to make your own. You may be familiar with making it at home in an air popper or on the stovetop, but did you know that all you need in order to skip the pre-packaged microwave bags is a jar of popcorn kernels and a brown paper lunch sack.

You guys, this is so easy! Here’s what you do:

Print

Healthy Microwave Popcorn

Healthy Microwave Popcorn in a paper lunch sack

Make healthy microwave popcorn with just popcorn kernels and a paper lunch sack. Makes a great whole-grain snack for older kids and adults and you can flavor it any way you want to!

Scale

Ingredients

1/4 cup popcorn kernals

optional toppings: melted butter or oil, salt or other seasonings

1. Measure out about 1/4 c popcorn kernals
2. Pour them into a paper lunch bag
3. Fold the top over several times and place in the microwave. Use the popcorn button and listen closely. When you hear the pops slow down to a couple seconds between pops, take it out.
4. Enjoy your popcorn! Season it if you wish.

Did you make this recipe?

Tag @theleangreenbean on Instagram

Have you tried making your own popcorn? What are you waiting for?

Healthy Microwave Popcorn

Make healthy microwave popcorn with just popcorn kernels and a paper lunch sack. Makes a great whole-grain snack for older kids and adults and you can flavor it any way you want to!

Let’s chat: Do you like popcorn? Plain or seasoned? What’s your favorite popcorn flavor combo?

Enjoy!
–Lindsay–

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Filed Under: SnackTagged With: Popcorn

Источник: https://www.theleangreenbean.com/healthy-microwave-popcorn/

Perfect Popcorn

Make sure the inside of the pot is completely dry before heating the oil in it, or else the oil will sputter.

  • 3tablespoonscoconut oil or extra virgin olive oil

  • 1/3cup high quality popcornkernels

  • 1tablespoonbutter or more to taste, optional

  • Salt to taste

  1. Heat the oil:

    Heat the oil in a 3-quart thick-bottomed saucepan on medium high heat. If you are using coconut oil, allow all of the solid oil to melt.

  2. Put 3 or 4 popcorn kernels into the oil:

    Wait for the popcorn kernels to pop.

  3. Add the rest of the popcorn:

    When the kernels pop, add the rest of the 1/3 cup of popcorn kernels in an even layer

  4. Cover the pot, remove from heat and count 30 seconds:

    (Count out loud! It's fun to do with kids.)

    This method first heats the oil to the right temperature, then waiting 30 seconds brings all of the other kernels to a near-popping temperature so that when they are put back on the heat, they all pop at about the same time.

  5. Return the pan to the heat:

    The popcorn should begin popping soon, and all at once. Once the popping starts in earnest, gently shake the pan by moving it back and forth over the burner.

    Tip: As the popcorn pops, try to keep the lid slightly ajar to let the steam from the popcorn release (the popcorn will be drier and crisper).

  6. Once the popping slows to several seconds between pops, remove the pan from the heat:

    remove the lid, and dump the popcorn immediately into a wide bowl.

    With this technique, nearly all of the kernels pop, and nothing burns.

  7. Melt butter in the empty hot pan:

    If you are adding butter, you can easily melt it by placing the butter in the now empty, but hot pan.

    Tip: if you let the butter get just a little bit brown, it will add an even more intense, buttery flavor to the butter and to your popcorn.

    Just drizzle the melted butter over the popcorn and toss to distribute.

  8. Sprinkle the popcorn with salt to taste:

    Fun toppings for the popcorn - Spanish smoked paprika, nutritional yeast, cayenne powder, chili pepper, curry powder, cumin, grated Parmesan cheese.

Popcorn Toppings

Want something more than butter or salt on your popcorn? Try sprinkling with some grated Parmesan cheese! Smoked paprika, nutritional yeast, cayenne powder, taco seasoning, or curry powder also make for fun and interesting toppings.

Have a favorite popcorn topping? Please let us know about it is popcorn cooked in olive oil good for you the comments.

Nutrition Facts
99Calories
11g Fat
1g Carbs
0g Protein
Show Full Nutrition LabelHide Full Nutrition Label
×
Nutrition Facts
Servings: 4
Amount per serving
Calories99
% Daily Value*
11g14%
Saturated Fat 8g42%
0mg0%
291mg13%
1g0%
Dietary Fiber 0g0%
Total Sugars 0g
0g

Nutrition information is calculated using an ingredient database and should be considered an estimate. In cases where multiple ingredient alternatives are given, the first listed is calculated for nutrition. Garnishes and optional ingredients are not included.

Источник: https://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/perfect_popcorn/
is popcorn cooked in olive oil good for you

5 Replies to “Is popcorn cooked in olive oil good for you”

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